Thought for the Week - Previous Weeks

Collections from Shri Gurudeo's writings and the teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj

Week 801-  |  Week 701-800

 Week 601-700 |  Week 501-600 |  Week 401-500 |  Week 301-400 |  Week 201-300 |  Week 101-200 |  Week 1-100


Week 968

It is only the Sages who know the value of spiritual experience. Others give themselves over to visible things. It is a law of nature that some carry merely logs of wood, while others wear rich jewels……The Sage is in possession of the inner spiritual treasure; others, who want to satisfy their appetite, follow after philosophical opinions. (Dasabodha VI. 9. 1-20).

(Page 410, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 967

A spiritual seeker, however, has only to depend on himself for the attainment of God. For "according as his inner emotion is, similarly does God manifest Himself to him. (Dasabodha III.10.13-19)

जैसा भाव जयापासीं । तैसा दैव तयासी ।

जाणे भाव अंतरसाक्षी । प्राणीमात्रांचा ॥ १३॥

(Page 410, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 966

He alone is entitled to the name of Sadhaka, whose heart is fixed on God.

(Page 394, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 965

I am a firm believer in the manifold activities of a nation, supplementing, instead of contradicting one another. I hold that when a nation rises, it rises from all points of view. The history of England at the time of Elizabeth, or the history of Maharashtra at the time of Shivaji, amply bears out the fact that when a nation rises, it attempts all enterprises. We must have scientists as well as philosophers; men who go in for action, and men who sit down to contemplate; people who devote themselves to social regeneration as well as those who care for personal development.

Page 182 , A vindication of Indian philosophy, Philosophical and other essays. R. D.Ranade

Week 964

It is only under the soothing influence of Divine Grace and Spiritual pursuits that man can learn to forget the ills and misfortunes that this life is heir to ...

(Excerpt from letter dated 31-3-1945 written by Shri Gurudev from Allahabad Page 84, Letter number 36, श्रीगुरुदेव रा. द. रानडे यांची जावक पत्रे , पहिली आवृत्ती : २०१९)

Week 963

...  whatever befalls us, we must discharge dutifully all the while supposing that whatever we do is contributing to the fulfillment of His purpose ...

(Excerpt from letter dated 31-3-1945 written by Shri Gurudev from Allahabad Page 84, Letter number 36, श्रीगुरुदेव रा. द. रानडे यांची जावक पत्रे , पहिली आवृत्ती : २०१९)

Week 962

The ultimate Power which guides the destinies of the world may be characterised in any way one pleases but when once we grant that Power, there should be no difficulty between points of view.

(Excerpt from letter dated July 1956 written by Shri Gurudev from Jamkhandi to Wrangler Raghunath Purushottam Paranjape, Page 166, Letter number 93, श्रीगुरुदेव रा. द. रानडे यांची जावक पत्रे , पहिली आवृत्ती : २०१९)

Week 961

... the only two poles round which a spiritual man's life should revolve are (1) meditation on the one hand and (2) morality on the other.

(Excerpt from letter dated 27-12-1933 written by Shri Gurudev from Allahabad, to Shri Ganapatrao Tulpule; Page 51, श्रीगुरुदेव रा. द. रानडे यांची जावक पत्रे , पहिली आवृत्ती : २०१९)

Readers are encouraged to read the entire original letter to fully recognise the real import of this excerpt

Week 960

Nobody can indeed save another from the clutches of Death, and all people have sometime or other to undergo the trial...... Some have just begun to tread the path of Death, others have gone half-way , others yet are about to reach the destination ...... only those have remained , who have realized the Self, and become united with Him.

असो ऐसे सकळही गेले | परंतु येकचि राहिले |

जे स्वरुपाकार  जाले  |  आत्मज्ञानी  ||५९||

(दासबोध दशक 3, समास 9, ओवी 59)

(Chapter III, Page 390, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 959

‘… that which the alchemists vainly seek after, may be found even in iron, provided the Parisa comes to hand; similarly, where there is the grace of the Guru, what cannot be obtained, asks Jnanesvara ? He is rich with the infinite grace of the Guru’

(Chapter III, Page 49, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 958

While a mere climber can attain to heights only through a long process of tortuous ascents, it is devotion alone which can carry us aloft at once like an aeroplane, the rate of speed being determined by the quality of the heart.

(Part I, Chapter V, Page 230, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 957

Great men might live and die silently; and it is the duty of their admiring disciples to let the world know of its greatest men. It is the very men who spurn greatness, that have the germs of real greatness in them; and knowing them by this mark, a wondering admirer might attend upon them, observe them in season and out of season, collect the necessary materials, and cause the whole world one day to ring with peals of applause.

(Page 79, Essay IV, The Art of Biography, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade)

Week 956

If thou but forgettest thyself in thy Guru, why needest thou be anxious at all that thou wilt not reach this end?

(Chapter XIX, Page 378, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

असो गुरुचे ठाईं अनन्यता | तरी तुज कायेसी रे चिंता |

वेगळेपणे अभक्ता | उरोंची नको ||५२||

(दासबोध दशक ५, समास ६ शुद्ध ज्ञान निरुपण)

Week 955

If I have tasted of the sweetness of your grace, O God, why should all these moral and physical evils pursue me? What right has this immoral and physical principle of evil to pursue a man who is following the path of God?  And yet this is what has happened in my case. Save me, O God - Purandaradasa

(Chapter IV Page 28, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 954

As Ramadasa puts it, मी मौनी म्हणताच भंगले मौन जैसे, ‘even the statement that “I am maintaining silence” breaks the silence !’. If you observe silence, says the poet (Nirupadhisidhhha), renouncing the egoistic sense of observing it, then O tongue, you would verily become Brahman.

(Chapter IV Page 54, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 953

... we ought to rate the scriptures only for what they are worth, whether they be Hindu, Mohammedan or Christian scriptures. They are all alike. They are like a small well (उदपान) in an all-enveloping sea of Atman.

(Page 193, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 952

... it is the responsibility of a realised soul to point the way to erring humanity and hence action becomes indispensable even for the realiser.

(Page 183, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 951

The life of a man ought to be best seen in his works and in his actions; and no separate monument in the form of an autobiography is needed to enshrine him in the hearts of the public.

(Page 78-79, Essay IV, The Art of Biography, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade)

Week 950

Jnana might be taken to mean either knowledge on the one hand or illumination on the other; and very often illumination is a better word than knowledge.

(Page 171, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 949

Students of Carlyle know very well his doctrine of ephemeralism. "A little while ago and you were not, a little while after and you are not." You are concerned only with the spacious present, the here and the now, the passing moment which may regarded either as real or unreal. In this doctrine of ephemeralism then we have a reconciliation of the two opposite doctrines of the Reality and the Unreality of the world.

(Page 167, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 948

Avatara is one who realises God within himself and spreads the message of God upon earth.

(Page 155, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 947

An Avatara is not needed, he (Aurobindo) says, for the Preservation of Right; that could be accomplished by other people like kings, prophets and sages. The function of an Avatara is much higher.

(Page 154, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 946

…man is nothing else than a transitory phase of His activity which man’s Ahamkara resists (Otto’s statement from his Das Bhagavadgita as translated in English)

(Page 143, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 945

... this attitude of apathy, indifference and disgust for all things which do not belong to God is a sure requisite of man's search after God.

(Page 236, The Bhagavad-Gita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 944

Every embodied being, he (Mahatma Gandhi) tells us, is an incarnation, though to be regarded as a perfect incarnation, some extraordinary service to mankind is necessary.

(Page 128, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 943

The urge for social development comes through the presence of the spiritual principle in man. It is this spiritual principle in man which enables him to find the spiritual principle in society.

(Page 116, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 942

He (Badarayana) says that liberation is attained only on the basis of moral and spiritual development and is not dependent upon times, days and seasons.

(Page 32, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 941

… our exhalations and inhalations are themselves due to the Order of God, and when God desires that we should have final exhalation, we do finally exhale and there is no further inhalation. Death is thus itself due to the Will and Order of God.

(Page 55, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 940

Life is evanescent; but while it lasts try to merge yourself in God...

Page 271 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 939

Honour the sages and receive from them strength, both moral and spiritual, which they can bestow without any lessening in their own spiritual equipment.... the spiritual wealth is never diminished by giving it away howsoever liberally to others.

Page 271 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 938

Ramadasa...states that God is our very life and we should not be indifferent to Him.

Page 269 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 937

The spiritual school established by the Saint of Nimbargi was praised by his great disciple, the Saint of Umadi, saying that such a spiritual school where the lessons in the realisation of God are taught so very easily and yet effectively, cannot be found from Kasi(Benares) to Ramesvara.

Page 266 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 936

A famous Saint of the South used to say that 'Kakadarati or Bhupali means that we have to drive away the Kaka, the canker of sleep from our own eyes, and rouse ourselves to the consciousness of God'.

Page 262 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 935

 ...the sixty minutes of one hour or the sixty seconds of one minute, not even one of which we should allow our mind to wander from God. Not a single Svasa or breath should go in vain, not a single second, not a single minute without God's remembrance.

Page 225 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 934

(The Bhagavad-Gita) regards a real Jnani as a Bhakta of the highest type.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 112, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 933

(On the occasion of Dasbodh Jayanti - Feb 15, 2019)

A great man’s life consists not of the miracles connected with him, but verily of his thoughts and utterances. It is from that point of view that the Dasabodha is remarkably valuable as giving us the spiritual autobiography of Ramadasa.

(Chapter XVIII, Page 373, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 932

Though the whole world is filled with divine light, he (Kudaluresa) tells us, one's own darkness, illusion, and despair and sin spread like a thick cover over that light so that one is unable to see it.

Page 59-60 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 931

His (Saint) business is to carry ... his disciples, along with him not being himself contaminated by the nauseating smell, the putrid stink of his disciples. If a man has attained Reality what can the evils and vices of his followers do to him? Really speaking they can do nothing to him. So he drags them along the path until he reaches his destination.

Page 111 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 930

'the wish-fulfilling cow, namely, the name of Hari has come to your doors of its own accord.' The name of God here is described as the wish-fulfilling cow.... You have not sought for this Kamadhenu the name of God, Oh man, says poet Mahipatisuta and yet she has now come to you of her own accord. She is always ready to protect those who remember her; but you are not cognisant of this fact.

Page 194-195 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 929

...the fact that "Extinguishment is the rule of life" should lead us to think deeper and search out a principle which can never either be ephemeral or extinguished.

Page 11, Introduction to Karnataka Mysticism R D Ranade, Extension Lecture Series : 1 Karnataka University, Dharwar

Week 928

So provided each one of us takes into his head to live well to live dutifully to live with a devotion to God, our sayings, our actions and generally our worth will be an index to the greatness of our teachers. It is from this point of view that I am looking at the message of Shri Nimbargi Maharaja.

Page 7, Introduction to Karnataka Mysticism R D Ranade, Extension Lecture Series : 1 Karnataka University, Dharwar 

Week 927

If you just live in the company of the saints or of your spiritual teacher you acquire automatically the virtue of silence.

Page 54 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 926

You have been born into many sheaths (bodies) till now and have lost and misused them. At least utilise the present sheath for the service of God.

Page 32 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 925

...he (Raidas) speaks of God as the purificatory cause: "Thou art, O God, ammonium chloride, and I am impure gold. It is only by Thy mixture with me that I can become purified."

(Part I, Chapter III, Page 150, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 924

You ought to associate yourself with the good in order that you might be able to meditate on God intensely inside your heart. That is the highest thing a man is capable of and that cannot be accomplished without the company of the good.

Page 45 Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 923

The night will soon depart bringing in the advent of a lovely dawn. The sun will soon rise and will induce the lotus to smile with joy (open its petals) . This was the rosy dream that was being woven by the bee shut up in the closed petals of a lotus, when , alas ! the lotus was suddenly plucked away by an elephant.

Page 22, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 922

... our sole endeavour should be to regard ourselves as the servants of God, as mere bondsmen of God... It is this kind of service to God which we should render and Revanasiddha tells us that this is the ultimate step towards the realisation of God.

Page 19, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 921

On the occasion of Vaikuntha Chaturdashi

... God is sure to be found and fully realised in the company of His devotees who sing His praises.

Page 275, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 920

The noble silent men, scattered here and there,...silently thinking; silently working; whom no Morning Newspaper makes mention of! They are the salt of the Earth - Carlyle

(Page 19, Signs Of The Times and Characteristics By Thomas Carlyle, Edited by R D Ranade)

Week 919

The consciousness of one's own impotence, as contrasted with the omnipotence of the overwhelming Reality, convinces the spiritual aspirant that it is because of the Grace, that he is elected to the beatific glory.

Page 301, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 918

I only consider how I shall present my soul undefiled before the Judge on that day - Socrates

(Gurudev's lecture points. Page 33, Professor R. D. RANADE As a Teacher and Author, B R Kulkarni)

Week 917

Everything rests with God and when this idea gains ground you will surely get rid of all your anxieties.

Page 40, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 916

...man is neither a free agent nor a bare automation in the hands of God but that he is an actor under the supervision of God and God assigns to him fruit according to the quality of his actions. God has given autonomy to man. He does not interfere with man's freedom.

Page 128, Vedanta - The Culmination Of Indian Thought

Week 915

'brother, soften your stony heart'...He (Saint of Nimbargi) tells us ... that the hearts of all of us are like stones and advises us to make mellow our stony hearts. Unless you make them mellow , there is no entrance for you into the spiritual life.

Page 247, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 914

The great Greek philosopher Empedocles tells us that there are two principles in this world - Love and Strife and that they are operating not merely in man but also in the entire universe. The universe is compared to a sphere. When Love enters the sphere, it drives away Strife; and when Strife enters, it drives away Love. The co-existence of the two here is impossible.

Page 72, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 913

God is already present in an assembly of saints who are enjoying a state of divine bliss - Purandaradasa

'Wherever two or three are gathered in my name' says the Bible, 'I am there'.

Page 166-167, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 912

I myself am afraid of doing bad things because my teacher would know them and I am fond of doing good things because they would also be known by him - Mahipatisuta

Page 74, Pathway to God in Kannada literature, R D Ranade

Week 911

Just as there is a caravanserai on a road where we put up at night and then walk off in the morning so is this life a caravanserai. We should not have any attachment for anything in this world but should be prepared to walk off as soon as we are called upon to do so.

Page 37, Pathway to God in Kannada Literature, R D Ranade

Week 910

There are many persons who pride themselves upon their intellectual knowledge. But they cannot hope to know God. God is not within the purview of mere knowledge. Also people pride themselves upon being great in this world; but they are nothing before the greatness of God. God has far more knowledge than all the knowers have and is far greater than those who claim to be great.

Page 167, Pathway to God in Kannada Literature, R D Ranade

Week 909

In the Moral sphere, we must make it a point not to let our left hand know what our right hand doeth : as soon as we whisper to our heart "how worthy is this action," it has at the same moment become worthless - Carlyle

Page 19, Carlyle - A Critical Review , R D Ranade

Week 908

Worship or prayer, therefore, is not to be performed with the lips but with the heart. And that can be performed equally by the dumb and the stammerer and the ignorant. Prayer must cleanse one's heart.

Page 73, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 907

I must therefore warn all against accepting imperfect ones as GURUS. It is better to grope in the dark and wade through a million errors to Truth then to entrust oneself to one who knows not that he knows not.

Page 72, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 906

God himself, says the Bhagavad Gita, seeks for His seat the heart of him who serves his fellowmen.

Page 71, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 905

Please the Gods by your actions and the Gods will please you...says the Bhagavad Gita....One may not be too critical of the Bhagavad Gita but one must supplement the eudemonistic doctrine taught in the above passage by the selfless realisation of the Self taught  by the Upanishads...

Page 31, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 904

...look to our own saving and leave the saving of the world to its Maker - Carlyle

Page 186, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 903

Death keeps away from us when we are thinking about God. Lust, anger, arrogance and avarice must all come to an end. Also, all desires, all actions, all illusions, all sins and all diseases must come to an end. When such a state is reached, says Kabir, true immortality is attained and death ceases to have any sway. These in short are the moral and psychological effects of spiritual meditation.

Page 177 Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 902

Now in the case of myself and in the case of people like myself, says Tulsidas, the tongue has only brought shame to the temple of the mouth. That mouth in which God should have taken his seat, my tongue has defiled and brought shame upon it. In that it has an accomplice, namely the ears. It is engaged in Parāpavāda, paranindā and Kāmakathā has a peculiar taste for fruitless discussion vādavivādasvāda. The ears are helping it by a contemplation of sexual and erotic matters which serve as the moonlight for the blossoming of ‘dispute’. So what is the way out? Tulsidas says, So that thou might take away the sins of the ears, engage thyself in the utterance of God’s name.

Page 149 Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 901

…requires solitude in the initial stages, in order that the virtues necessary for an active life may be gathered in the secrets of retirement. Such a solitude is the fountain-head of energy and strength, virtue and joy. Activity to be productive, must be fed by retired thought....Solitude is not meant for inaction : on the contrary, it is the nurse of supreme action.

A Vindication of Indian Philosophy, Sri R D Ranade, Page 151, “Silver Jubilee Souvenir Vol II – Academy of Comparative Philosophy & Religion)

Week 900

But all men who have sinned - and let he, who is sinless, contradict this - and those who have come to have an earnest desire for righteousness, wish from the bottom of their hearts to come nearer God. So too can a sense of eternity, the pangs of sorrow, the bitings of conscience, the vanity of human wishes or a keen social enthusiasm bring man nearer God. It is in such a state of mind that he begins to love God as his only guide and helper, and it is in such a state that the whole moral world opens up before him.

A Vindication of Indian Philosophy, Sri R D Ranade, Page 154, “Silver Jubilee Souvenir Vol II – Academy of Comparative Philosophy & Religion)

Week 899

In fact, the different views on God would not lead us very far in determining the nature of God. We must ultimately have spiritual experience. But it is not given to every man to be born with the mystic's spoon in his mouth, hence even an intellectual apprehension of God might make a man arrive at the determination of an idea of God which would suit him best.

Page 114 Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 898

It is only when we find a change and development in the character and conduct of a man that we are entitled to say that he has lived a spiritual life. It is the transformed character and conduct of a man, therefore, says Gandhiji, that constitutes the real index to his spiritual development. 

Page 78 Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 897

...grace from God cannot descend upon us unless three things are fulfilled. The devotee must feel Prema (Love) for God; he must have a Asakti for Him; and ultimately he must succumb almost to the vice of devotion - Vyasana. Such devotees do not care for liberation.  They care only for the Spiritual life and its consummation here below in this physical world not waiting for another world or existence.

(Page 56, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade)

Week 896

Heed ultimately not to what men say. Heed the inner Monitor, the still small voice.

(Page 46, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade)

Week 895

what a meditator ought to do in the process of meditation…may be compared to the setting in motion of a Charkhā…there should be concentrated attention in the plying of the Charkhā…Do not look here and there, says Sharifsaheb…Dārikārasa ninna māriya nodalu, māri etti nodabedammā. Other passers-by might come and cast glance at you, but do not return their look. That is not your job. Your job is merely to spin. Do that. So, one-pointed devotion and concentrated attention is what is wanted by this spiritual spinner.

(Chapter 4 Page 153-154, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade) 

Week 894

Sri Ranade (and the great tradition which he represented) said with the Greek master Socrates, that real knowledge is virtue, that knowledge is real assimilated knowledge, only when it becomes a part of one’s character and flows out in conduct or action. Knowledge is knowledge strictly so called, only when it expresses itself in virtue.

(Page 34, Sri R D Ranade, His works and Message, Dr P Narasimhayya M.A., Ph.D., “Silver Jubilee Souvenir vol II – Academy of Comparative Philosophy & Religion)

Week 893

…how is it that all of us perceive the same Sun, moon and Stars? And the answer that Sir James Jeans gives is, that this is so because there is one continuous stream of life which runs through the whole of Nature, and which permeates us all.

(Extract from the Presidential address by R D Ranade at the XIIIth session of the Indian Philosophical Congress)

Week 892

The gardener spares no pains in sprinkling water over plants and trees; but it is only when the spring sets in that they bear fruit...... Similarly, all the sciences that we may have practised, become successful only when the Guru sends down his grace.

(Chapter III, Page 113, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 891

The first step in the advancement of spiritual life consists in rising from the life of sense to a belief in God and in those who are beloved to God.

(Chapter III, Page 112, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 890

There is a distinction between the Khaira and the Chandana trees only so long as they are not put into fire; but as soon as they are put inside it, they become one with it, and the distinction between them vanishes. Similarly, the Kshatriyas, the Vaisyas, the Sudras, and Women are so-called only so long as they have not reached Me. But having reached Me, they cease to be distinguished; as salt becomes one with the ocean, even so they become one with Me

(Chapter III, Page 111, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 889

As when seeds are put in fire, they are deprived of the possibility of germination, similarly , both good and bad actions, when they are offered to Me, cease to germinate. As soon as actions have been offered to Me, all considerations of birth and death go away...... Wait not for the morrow. Make use at once of this device for actionlessness.

(Chapter III, Page 102-103, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)Week 888

...hypocrisy, pride, arrogance, anger, harshness, and ignorance... These six vices constitute the whole demoniac heritage... Those who oppose the will of God by their demoniac qualities, are born in the most heinous kinds of existences, which are only the dung-hill of misery, or the sewage-pit of the world of existence.

(Chapter III, Page 91-92, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 887

The plumage of a peacock is covered all over with eyes, but there is no vision in the eyes; similarly, the knowledge of the various sciences is as nothing when the knowledge of the Self is excluded...

(Chapter III, Page 86, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 886

…perfect souls, however are very rare. In this wide world, only by rare chance may it be possible for one to meet such a man. Equally rare is he who is gifted with the vision to recognise such a man, if chance but puts him in his way.

(Chapter XII, Page 255, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 885

Not only is the way of Bhakti easier than the path of knowledge, but it is by itself sufficient. As the Sun requires no help to dispel darkness, Bhakti requires no external help to destroy Avidya. Intellectual knowledge is unnecessary.

(Chapter XII, Page 251, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 884

ईश्वराचा साक्षात्कार हा दीर्घकाल साधन करण्यावर अवलंबून नाहीं. पंचवीस कोटी जप केल्यानें तो होईल असें नाहीं. साक्षात्काराला अंत:करणाचें मार्दव व देवा बद्दल कळवळा असावा लागतो. तो असल्यावर देव दूर नाहीं. (गुरुदेव)

(Reference : दे. भ. गंगाधरराव देशपांडे यांचे आत्मनिवेदनपर भाषण व डॉ. रानडे यांचा समारोप – सांगली येथे माळबंगल्यावर झालेले व्याख्यान. ता. १८-१२-१९५१)

Really God-realisation does not depend merely upon prolonged Sadhana. We cannot be sure of having the vision of God after performing Nama-japa for 25 crores of times. God-realisation requires a tenderness of heart and an intense hunger for it. When these are present, God is near.

(English version reference - Glimpses of Sri Gurudev, Editor B R Kulkarni, Publisher: Academy Of Comparative Philosophy and Religion, Belgaum)

Week 883

We should speak only when one is spoken to; otherwise we should recite the Vedas, or utter the name of God.

Chapter III, Page 96, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade

Week 882

The body, which is naturally subject to laziness, must, in the performance of duty, be subjected to the repetitions of good acts.

(Chapter III, Page 95, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 881

We must not say that the flame of a lamp is small, as it produces great light; similarly , when true intellect is ever so little, we must say it nevertheless shows great power...Thus the goal of true Intellect is God, just as the goal of the Ganges is the ocean. We may therefore define true Intellect as that which concerns itself with God above anything else whatsoever.

(Chapter III, Page 93, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 880

The Tulasi plant is reared in a house, but no desire is entertained for its fruit, or flower, or shade. In a similar manner, that kind of sacrifice is alone real in which there is no reference to any fruit whatsoever.

(Chapter III, Page 95, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 879

God-love is the charioteer who leads the chariot of life to spiritual victory.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 83, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 878

Even now, Oh tongue, begin to utter the Name of God, for thou dost not know whether thou wilt be able to move at all at the time of death.

(Part II, Chapter I, Page 311, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 877

…bondage consists in the thought of I and mine, and that this bondage may be broken only for those in whom all craving is extinct.

Page 112 Essay IX Buddha and the Gospel of Buddhism*, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade

*By Ananda Coomarswamy, D.Sc., Harrap and Co.,London. (p.221)

Week 876

…in matters of spiritual progress, one may please God; but unless one has understood from the Guru what should be asked of God, one is likely to go wrong and lose the golden opportunity.

Chapter XII Page 253, Mysticism in Maharashtra R D Ranade

Week 875

What is the value of the Vedāntin who is not noble in his behaviour, who is not self-sacrificing, who does not see equality among all men, who is not free from passions and prejudices, and whose consecration of life is not for the realisation of the kingdom of God among men?

Page 101, Essay VII, Studies in Vedanta, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade

Week 874

The life of a man ought to be best seen in his works and in his actions…

Page 78, Essay IV, The Art Of Biography, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade

Week 873

It is the soul and not the body which is worth loving, and he must be a poor admirer who loves the graces of the body, and not the beauty of the soul.

Page 30, Essay III, Greek and Sanskrit : A Comparative Study, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade

Week 872

Indian Philosophy need not be judged by the utility it may confer on man; the Sun may not be judged by the quantity of gas he saves us. Indian Philosophy may not bake any bread; but like its compeer philosophies, it will give man God, Freedom, Immortality. Even if we choose to look at it from the pragmatic point of view, it may be confidently asserted that it will give satisfaction no less than any other philosophy of the globe.

Page 12, Essay I, On the Study of Indian Philosophy, Essays and Reflections, R. D. Ranade

Week 871

Just as a carpenter takes a material and an instrument and creates his article by their help, similarly God the incomparable carpenter very dexterously offers himself as both the material and efficient cause and thus creates the world.

Chapter 1 Page 55, Spiritual Awakening in Gandhi and other Indian Saints, R D Ranade

Week 870

…all…saints are characterised by a contrition of the heart, by the helplessness of human endeavour to reach unaided the majesty of God, by a sense of sinfulness inherent to human nature, by the necessity of finding out a Guru who may relieve them from the sufferings of the world, and finally, by the phenomena of conversion almost in every individual case.

Chapter IX Page 209, Mysticism in Maharashtra R D Ranade

Week 869

To say the body is ours, or the children or the wife or the wealth is ours, is not to know that all these are in the hands of Death. We bind ourselves to these things like a parrot which sits upon an iron bar, falsely fastening itself to it.

Chapter V Page 167, Mysticism in Maharashtra R D Ranade

Week 868

It is only अव्यभिचारिणी भक्ति which ultimately takes us beyond the three gunas.

मां च यो‌‍ऽव्यभिचारेण भक्तियोगेन सेवते |
स गुणान् समतीत्यैतान् ब्रह्मभूयाय कल्पते || XIV. 26.

It is only Bhakti-yoga which enables us to go beyond the three gunas and thus to attain the highest ideal.

Chapter XVII, Page 194, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade.

Week 867

Any man who can carry on his Karmas in a spirit of Anasakti might be regarded as having reached  नैष्कर्म्य…It means rising superior to the modus operandi of Karmas and their effects through the principle of non-attachment.

Chapter XVII, Page 191, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade.

Week 866

... a man who performs selfless actions cannot be said to be performing any actions at all.

Chapter XVI, Page 183, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 865

…selfless action or Niskāma Karma would alone enable us to move out of thraldom to actions.

Chapter XVI, Page 183, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 864

He (Carlyle) teaches us sublime optimism. Let us remember, he (Carlyle) says, that “here on earth we are as soldiers, fighting in a foreign land; that understand not the plan of the campaign, and have no need to understand it; seeing well what is at our hand to be done. Let us do it like Soldiers; with submission, with courage, with a heroic joy.” Never before has a spiritual optimism been more effectively preached.

(Source book: R D Ranade, Essays and Reflections, Page 176 , Carlyle)

Week 863

“There is but one virtue” as Fichte would say, “to forget oneself as a person; one vice, to remember oneself”

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade, Bibliographical note, Page 493)

Week 862

He (Carlyle) advises us not to deal too much in vaticination: our duty is not to see what lies at a distance, but to do the work which lies nearest us. "Man is sent hither not to question but to work: 'the end of man' it was long ago written, 'is an Action, not a Thought". Carlyle teaches us not to idle away our life in mere sentimentalism.

R D Ranade, Essays and Reflections: Carlyle , page 174

Week 861

उभाभ्यामेव पक्षाभ्यां यथा खे पक्षिणां गतिः |
तथैव ज्ञानकार्मभ्यां प्राप्यते ब्रह्म शाश्वतम ||

says the sage Harita. Just as a bird cannot fly without two wings, so Jnana and Karma are both necessary for the flight of the individual to the Absolute.

Chapter XVI, Page 182, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 860

…our mind must become pure before we could have any experience of the sublime.

Chapter XXI, Page 261, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 859

Even supposing that a man is fortunate to commence his journey on the spiritual path, a vast amount of time is necessary to enable him to go ahead, not to speak of reaching the end. तत्स्वयं योगसंसिद्धः कालेनात्मनि विन्दति | (IV. 38.). It is not a two years’, three years’ or a five years’ plan that would be enough to enable him to reach the God-hood. In fact, time has nothing to do with it. What is wanted is the inner quality of the heart which may enable him to conquer time.  In order, however that that quality might be attained, अभ्यास may be necessary but it is not all. If you have reached a particular stage of भाव, then neither much time nor much practice would be needed. Normally, however, people are not endowed with that kind of भाव. Therefore, they have to depend on practice and time (अभ्यास and काल). Suppose a man has spent about fifty years of his life in the spiritual pursuit; of course, it may be granted that he may be on a comparatively higher level than what he occupied a few years ago; but he can never be said, only on that account, to have reached the Absolute End.

Chapter XVIII, Page 212-213, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 858

The most important point…which the Bhagavadgitā makes is not the determination of the nature of God, but the way for the practical attainment of Him…In fact, to come to grips with the attainment of God from the practical point of view is a far greater achievement than to determine the nature of God from the philosophical point of view, which would merely plunge us into a bog of intellectual warfare.

Chapter XVIII, Page 205, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 857

…it is extremely difficult to meet a man who has reached the highest spiritual end…If you are fortunate enough to meet an आत्मज्ञ , then that would be another matter. It is only he who has realised his identity with God, who is capable of imparting the secret of spiritual life. Such persons are rare.

Chapter XVIII, Page 211, The Bhagavadgitā as a Philosophy of God-realisation (Being a clue through the labyrinth of modern Interpretations) R D Ranade

Week 856

How difficult it is to live with a man, who either does not know manners, or who, you suppose, does not give as much respect to yourself or to your feelings, as you would like he should give. The root of the mischief perhaps lies in yourself. You cannot command respect unless you deserve it!

Extract from Reflections, R D Ranade,  22nd February 1912

Week 855

Tukārāma … descants upon the uselessness of desire. “Man need only care for a seer of rice. Why need he waste words for other things?......His space is measured, which is just three and a half cubits. Why should he aspire after more land? To forget God, he says, is to put ourselves into all sorts of trouble”.

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 353, Chapter XVI)

४८७. तुला एक शेर अन्नाची चाढ आहे, विनाकारण तृष्णा कां वाढवतोस ?

एक शेरा अन्ना चाड | येर वाउगी बडबड ||
कां रे तृष्णा वाढविसी | बांधवूनि मोहपाशीं ||
औट हात तुझी जागा | येर सिणसी वाउगा ||
तुका म्हणे श्रम | एक विसरतां राम ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १६३

Week 854

“There is a very great difference, “ says Tukā, “between seeming and real affection. What seems is not reality. A shepherd used to attend the sermon of a priest, and he was so much moved by hearing the sermon, that he shed tears in seeming sorrow. People supposed that he was weeping for devotion. But what moved him to tears was really a different thing altogether. The priest once asked the shepherd why he was weeping, and the shepherd pointed to the two horns and feet, saying ‘I am put in my mind of my dead ram when I hear your voice. Thus it is that your sermon moves me to tears’. Seeming affection, says Tukā is not real affection”

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 353, Chapter XVI)

४८६. पुराणिकाची दाढी पाहून एका बाईस आपल्या बोकडाची आठवण झाली

देखोनी पुराणिकाची दाढी | रडे फुंदे नाक ओढी ||
प्रेम खरें दिसे जनां | भिन्न अंतरी भावना ||
आवरिता नावरे | खुर आठवी नेवरे ||
बोलों नये मुखावाटां | म्हणे होता व्यांचा तोटा ||
दोन्हीं सिंगे चारी पाय | खुणा  दावी म्हणे होय ||
मना आणितां  बोकड | मेला त्याची चरफड ||
होता भाव पोटीं  | मुखा आलासे सेवटीं  ||
तुका म्हणे कुडें  | कळों  येतें तें रोकडें ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १६३

Week 853

"Let all the emotions be now transformed for the sake of God. Thou followest evanescent things. Why dost thou not follow God ? As thou lovest another person, why dost thou not love God ? Thou hast affection for thy son. Why dost thou not have that same affection towards God ? Thou lovest thy wife, who ultimately robs thee of everything that thou hast got. Why dost thou not have that same tender affection for God ? Thou worshippest thy parents in the consciousness of their obligation. Why dost thou not regard the obligation of God ? Thou art afraid of other men. Why art thou not afraid of God ? Dost thou suppose that thou hast come to life in vain ?

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 347, Chapter XVI)

४४९. विषयांकडे जसें तुझें प्रेम आहे तसे देवाकडे कां नाहीं ?

देवाचें भजन कां रे न करिसी तैसें|अखंड हव्यासीं पिडितोसि ||
देवासी शरण कां रे न करिसी तैसें| बक मीना जैसा मनुष्यालागीं ||
देवाचा विश्वास कां रे नाहीं तैसा | पुत्रस्नेहें जैसा गुंतलासी ||
कां रे नाहीं तैसी देवाची ते गोडी | नागवूनी सोडी पत्नी जैसी ||
कां रे नाहीं तैसे देवाचे उपकार | माया मिथ्या भार पितृजन ||
कां रे भय वाहसी लोकांचा तूं धाक | विसरोनियां एक नारायण ||
तुका म्हणे कां रे घातलेंसें वायां | सर्व आयुष्य जायां भक्तीविण ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १४९

Week 852

People do not experience tears in the contemplation of God, says Tuka. "Unless tears come out of our eyes in the contemplation of God, we cannot be said to have true devotion. Tears indeed are an index of love towards God"
(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 347, Chapter XVI)

४५१. जोंपर्येंत नेत्रांतून जळ वहात नाहीं तोंपर्येंत सगळी बडबड व्यर्थ आहे
नये नेत्रीं जळ | नाही अंतरी कळवळ ||
तों हे चावटीचे बोल | जन रंजवणें फोल ||
न फळें उत्तर | नाहीं स्वामी जों सादर ||
तुका म्हणे भेटी | जंव नाहीं धृष्टा धृष्टी ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १५०

Week 851

"Your hands and feet must work for the sake of God. You have speech to utter His praise, and ears to hear His greatness. You have eyes to see His form. Blind men, and deaf men, and dumb men, and lame men, have hitherto gone without having an opportunity of serving God. He, who keeps himself in his house by setting it on fire, will soon cease to exist. Now at least, says Tukā, be awake, and do what is conducive to the highest happiness"

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 347, Chapter XVI)

४४७. तुमचीं सगळीं इंद्रियें शाबूत असून तुम्ही देवाचें ध्यान कां करीत नाहीं ?
सदैव तुम्हां अवघें आहे | हात पाय चालाया ||
मुखीं वाणी कानीं किर्ती |डोळे मूर्ती देखाया ||
अंधबहिर ठकलीं किती | मुकीं होतीं पांगुळ ||
घरा आगी लावूनी जागा | न पळे तो गा वाचेना ||
तुका म्हणे जागा हिता | कांही आतां अपुल्या ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १४९

Week 850

The blossom may be infinite, but the fruits are few. Fewer still are the fruits that ripen, and fewest come unspoilt from the fruit-store. Rare indeed is the man who has the satisfaction of having reached the end......Rare is the man who attains to victory in the midst of blazing swords. I shall call him my companion says Tukā, who has been able to reach the end.

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 346, Chapter XVI)

४४१. प्राप्तीच्या पैलतीरी | विपाइला निघे

महुरा ऐसीं फळें नाहीं | आलीं कांहीं गळतीं ||
पक्कदशे येतीं थोडीं | नास आधी वेंचे तों ||
विरुळा पावे विरुळा पावे | अवघड गोवे सेवटाचे ||
उंच निंच परिवार देवीं | धन्या ठेवी चाकरी ||
झळके तेथें पावे आणि | ऐसे क्षणीं बहु थोडे ||
पावेल तो पैलथडी | म्हणों गडी आपुला ||
तुका म्हणे उभारयानें| खरें कोण मानितसे ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १४७

Week 849

And it is wonderful, says Tukā, that when such a real spiritual experience is within the reach of all, they should carry on their physical life as alone real. "They forget the memory of death......They forget that the body is merely a prey to death. They shut their eyes and grow deliberately blind"

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 344, Chapter XVI)

४३० व्यवहार सत्य म्हणून चालण्यास तुम्हांस आधार काय ?

पडिली हे रूढि जगा परिचार | चालविती वेव्हार सत्य म्हूण||
मरणाची कां रे नाहीं आठवण | संचिताचें धन लाभ हेवा ||
देहाचें भय तें काळाचें भातुकें | ग्रासूनि  तें एकें ठेविलेंसे ||
तुका म्हणे काहीं उघडा रे डोळे | जाणोनी आंधळे होऊं नका ||
Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १४४

Week 848

...it is due to the universal immanence of God that He acts as a thread through all the pearls of existence. He is verily the vinculum substantiale of all, and holds all things together. "By our relation to God, the whole world has become ours, as all pearls are threaded on the same string......The happiness and misery of others is reflected in us as the happiness and misery of ourselves is reflected in them"

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 343, Chapter XVI)

४२७ . ईश्वर म्हणजे विश्वव्यापक सूत्रच आहे.

देवाच्या संबंधे विश्वची सोयरें | सूत्र ओढें दोरें एका एक ||

आहाच तें नव्हे विटायासारीखें | जीव जीवनीं देखें सामावलें ||

आणिकांचें सुखदुःख उमटे अंतरीं | एथील इतरीं तेणें न्यायें ||

तुका म्हणे ठसावलें शुद्धाजाती | शोभाचि पुढती विशेषता ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १43

जगव्यापक जनार्दन हा या जगाच्या अंतर्यांमामध्यें एक सूत्रच आहे असें उपनिषत्कारांप्रमाणें तुकारामांचे मत होतें

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान २२ (प्रस्तावना)

Week 847

The Saints by their perfect morality and devotion raise themselves to the position of the Godhead. Tukārāma tells us that "Gods are Saints, and Saints are Gods. Images are merely the occasional cause of worship......The impersonal God cannot satisfy our wants. But the Devotee satisfies all.

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 341, Chapter XVI)

४१३. संत म्हणजेच देव होत

देव ते संत, देव ते संत | निमित्य त्या प्रतिमा ||

मी तों सांगतसें भावें |असो ठावें सकळां ||

निराकारी ओस दिशा | येथें इच्छा पुरतसे ||

तुका म्हणे रोकडें केणें | सेवितां येणें पोट धाय ||

 Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १३

अशा श्रेष्ठ संतांमध्ये व देवांमध्यें कोणताही भेद नाही; प्रतिमा या केवळ निमित्तमात्र होत, निराकारांत सर्व दिशा ओस भासतात , पण येथें सर्व इच्छा पुरतात

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान २१ (प्रस्तावना)

Week 846

The Saints have indeed kept their shops open, and give to whomsoever goes to them with any desire. The Saints indeed are generous, and their treasure cannot be emptied. Those who beg will have heart's content, and yet a large remainder will be left for others. When a bag is filled with God, says Tukā, it can be never be emptied.

(Source book: Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade Page 340, Chapter XVI)

४०७. देवाने भरलेले पोतें रिकामें कसें होईल ?

घातला दुकान | देती आलियांसी दान ||

संत उदार उदार | भरलें अनंत भांडार  ||

मागत्याची पुरे | घणी आणिकांसी उरे ||

तुका म्हणे पोतें | देवें भरिलें नव्हे रिते ||

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान १३६

आपल्या उदारपणानें ते अमूल्यधनचें आल्यागेल्यांस दान करितात

Source book: तुकाराम वचनामृत पान २१ (प्रस्तावना)

Week 845

The spiritual power of the Saints is indeed very great. "The sun and the lamp and the diamond show things that are visible. But the Saints show things which are invisible..........Parents are the cause of birth. But Saints are the cause of the cessation of birth ......It is for these reasons, says Tukā, that we should go to the Saints unasked, and cling to their feet".

(Page 339-340, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 844

Places of pilgrimage are useful to those who have devotion. In the company of the Saints, on the other hand, even rustics become good, says Tukā.

(Page 339, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 843

The Saints incarnate in this world only in order to uplift the unholy, and to increase happiness and devotion to God. Just as a sandal tree can make other trees fragrant, similarly, a Saint makes other people holy in this world.

(Page 337, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 842

Tulsidas compares Jnana to a lamp which burns, and Bhakti to a jewel which illumines.

(General Introduction,  Page 18, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 841 (To mark the occasion of Buddha Purnima on 10th May 2017)

The "virtues" which have been mentioned by ... Asoka are ... : good, absence of defilement, mercy, liberality, truth, purity, gentleness; and the "duties" which Asoka  regards as incumbent upon everybody are non-slaughter, non-injury, obedience to mother, attendance to elders, and reverence to teachers - a list very closely approximate to the list of the virtues in the Taittiriya Upanishad. These virtues and these duties constitute Asoka's message to the world for all climes and ages. But one very specific virtue to which Asoka refers ... is the virtue, self-examination or introspection. "It is difficult", says Asoka, "for a person to conduct self-examination, and see through the evil he has committed. But unless one does it, one cannot purge the evils inherent to the body, speech and mind". Hence he insisted upon self-examination as the supreme virtue, and as the sine qua non of spiritual progress.

(Page 158-159, Philosophical and Other Essays, The Ideal of Kingship)

Week 840

It is the duty of His devotee to remember Him at every step, and then God will follow him with all happiness.

(Page 335, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 839

He who follows God, shall never be left by Him in the lurch...God does really come to their rescue. What is, however, wanted is patience. God shall never leave His Saints un-cared for.

(Page 334, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 838

"If we carry on our spiritual practice regularly, what can it not achieve ?" asks Tukā. "The wet root of a plant breaks even huge rocks . Practice can achieve anything whatsoever. Nothing can stand in the way of a determined effort...". "...Through practice, says Tukā, even the impossible becomes possible".

(Page 313-314, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 837

Tukārāma charges people to cease from doing wrong henceforth. "For whatever has happened hitherto through ignorance, I forgive you all. But do not commit any sins henceforth...Your sins will be washed away if you do not commit them again. Utter the name of Vitthala, and you will be free from your sins. Sins shall have no existence before the power of God's name. Millions of sinful acts will be burnt in the fire of God's name. Do not look backwards..."

(Page 312, Chapter XV Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 836

God does not possess salvation ready-made, so that He may hand it over to His devotee. Salvation consists in conquering the senses and mind, and making them empty of the pursuit of objects"

(Page 279, Chapter XV Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 835

Do not follow the lore of the learned books. Take a vow that you would seek the grace of God by emptying your heart of its innate desires......God will come to your rescue by the power of the Name, and take you across the ocean of life.

(Page 279, Chapter XV Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 834

If the mind is pure, then verily even enemies become friends; ... these things will happen when one knows that there is the same immanent Being in the hearts of all.

(Page 275, Chapter XV Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade

Week 833

If Divine Knowledge is communicated by the Guru, why worship God?

It might be objected that if the Guru is able to give everything that the disciple wants, there is no necessity of praying to God at all. Let it be remembered once for all, that without God's grace a true Spiritual Teacher can never be found. In a sense, it might be said that the Guru and God are one. And secondly, God confers His grace only upon those that have been favoured by Saints. This has been clearly expressed by Vasudeva to Nārada : "O Nārada, thou art the favourite of God. He saves those only that are favoured by you."

...to be continued next week

(The Bhagavata of Ekānatha XXII.97-100; X.138)

(Page 253, Chapter XII Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 832

...on a careful consideration of the intimate nature of moral action, it may become evident that the law issuing from anybody except one's own Self can never be regarded as a sufficient guarantee for the moral tone of actions.

(Chapter VI Page 291, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 831

Ekanātha tells us principally to observe one rule in life : we should never follow what our mind dictates to us. What the mind regards as happiness comes ultimately to be experienced as unhappiness. We should thus always keep our mind imprisoned at God's feet.

(Page 222, Chapter XI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 830

Like other saints, he (Senā) also believes in the great efficacy of the Name. One does not require to inhale smoke, or to sit in the midst of the five fires. One has merely to make his mind calm, and with a concentrated attention sing the praises of God. There is no other remedy except this, says Senā. God will surely come, and relieve His devotee. He makes no consideration of caste or quality. He runs at once to the cause of those who love Him. (The Teachings of Senā).

(Page 207, Chapter VIII Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 829

By means of the unstruck sound, think always upon God, and meditate upon Him in your heart. That will endow you with true love of God, and show you His pathway, as it did Narahari. (The Teachings of Narahari).

(Page 203-204, Chapter VIII Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 828

There is one way, says Nāmadeva, to reach God, namely, that we should go and take resort with the saints; for when we have worshipped the saints, we shall certainly see God. (Abhangas of Nāmadeva  and other Saints)

(Page 198, Chapter VIII Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 827

The ... characteristic of a Saint is his absolute equality. "A Saint devotes himself entirely to the happiness of others. He worships God in helping his fellow-beings. When one troubles others, we may say, he hates God......This alone is Saint-hood, says Tukā; for , by this, man makes himself equal to the Self". (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 338, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 826

We have heard of many people who have harboured the name of God in their minds. They have crossed the ocean of life, and have gone to the other shore. Let us go by the very same way as much as may lie within our power. The ferry which has carried them has been reserved for us, and there shall now be no delay. We need not pay even a farthing for it. We need only have devotion.

(Page 328, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 825

The Saints have planted aloft the banner of God...If you go by the path indicated by the banner of God, you will surely be able to find God. (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 328, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 824

It is only when a man is anxious to see God, says Tukā, that God is anxious to meet him. (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 328, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 823

Whatever unholy deeds are committed by men and women, when they remember God with repentance, they become free from sins. (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 327, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 822

“One need not worship stones, or brass, or any kind of images. What is required is pure devotion. That is the way to liberation. What is the use of these rosaries, and these garlands? Why need we care for a learned voice? Why need we care for a beautiful song? If we have no devotion, God will not care for us, says Tukā”. (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 325, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 821

"He alone attends a Kirtana who wishes to uplift himself. Nobody asks an ant to go where sugar is to be found. A beggar seeks out a donor of his own accord. He who is hungry goes and finds out food. He who suffers from a disease, goes of his own accord to the house of a doctor. He who wishes to uplift himself, says Tukā, never fails to attend a Kirtana". (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 322, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 820

"Enclose the Name of God in your mouth. Think constantly of what is valuable and what is not valuable. By meditation on God, all difficulties will vanish. We shall thus be able to cross the uncrossable ocean of life......The whole lineage will become pure, says Tukā, by the utterance of God's Name". (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 321, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 819

He who utters the name of God while eating, gets the merit of a fast even though he may have taken his meals. (Tukarama's Mystical Teaching)

(Page 320, Chapter XVI Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 818

God can be attained by meditation on His name only. I implore the young and the old, says Nāmadeva, to cling fast to the Name of God. In all your religious ceremonies, you should think only of God, and nothing else. (The Abhangas of Nāmadeva)

(Page 195, Chapter VIII Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 817

One should verily shut one's ears, when other people are being censured or dispraised for nothing. One should shut up one's mouth, and in a mystical manner meditate on God. (The Abhangas of Nivrittinatha)

(Page 167, Chapter V Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 816

God shows Himself to a devotee, only if this latter possesses good emotions and desires. (The Abhangas of Nivrittinatha)

(Page 167, Chapter V Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 815

...doubt not, O Arjuna. At the very moment that the devotee remembers Me, I am before him. I cannot bear the burden of his love towards Me. I am his debtor and he is My creditor; and for discharging My debt, I serve him personally at the time of his death. For fear that bodily suffering may kill his consciousness, I protect him under the wings of Self-illumination. I spread about him the cool shade of My remembrance, and I bring him towards Me, because his heart has been forever set on Me. (Jnanesvari VIII. 120-133)

(Page 133, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 814

Jnanevara tells us... His devotees need never entertain any anxiety for their material and spiritual welfare. "They are doing duties that are proper for them according to their caste. They obey the law, and discard every thing that is not sanctioned by morality. They deliver their actions to Me, and thus burn their results......The goal of all their bodily, mental, and verbal activity, is I Myself......They are meditating on My form......With one-pointed devotion, they have sold their mind and body to Me. Tell Me, O Arjuna, what shall I not do for them ? ......Is it possible that My devotees be ever troubled by any anxiety for their worldly life ?..." (Jnanesvari XII.76-85)

(Page 131, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 813

...if a man's mind and knowledge become filled by My love, he becomes the best of mortals: he is the greatest among those who know. Thus, neither family, nor caste, nor colour, are of any avail in Me. What is wanted is the directing of the mind towards Me. (Jnanesvari IX.441-461)

(Page 111, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 812

As when a lamp is lighted by a lamp, one cannot distinguish which was the earlier, and which later; similarly, when he has begun to love Me, he has become one with Me, and there is no distinction between us. (Jnanesvari IX.418-428)

(Page 110, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 811

Even though a man may be quite sinful at first, still by believing in Me, he becomes the best of men, as one, who is dying in an ocean, might just escape death in the waters...... (Jnanesvari IX.418-428)

(Page 110, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 810

Jnaneswara offers the highest kind of consolation to those who have lived wretched and sinful lives. He gives hope even to the fallen. He tells us that even these, if they but conceive love towards God, have in them the power of reaching God. The sinner, we are told, can and does become a saint. (Jnanesvari IX.418-428)


(Page 110, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 809

If we follow the track of those who have gone before us, we cannot see any returning footprints. The histories and mythologies of this world are merely collections of death-stories. It is wonderful that people should live at ease in such a world !........Alas, born in this mortal world, O Arjuna, get thyself hastily from it; go by the path of Bhakti, so that thou mayest reach My divine home. (Jnanesvari IX. 490-516)

Week 808

...a man, who follows the advice of the worthy Guru, is able to reach the Atman without undergoing the travail of walking on the other avenues.

(Page 108, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 807

We may safely perform all our family duties, as well as obey all positive and negative social injunctions. We may be permitted to do all these things. But we must remember that whatever action we are doing mentally, orally, or physically must not be egoistically attributed to ourselves. To do or not to do depends not upon us, but upon God who moves the whole world........Throw thy intellect firmly in Me. (Jnanesvari XII. 114-124)

(Page 103, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 806

...the Ideal Sage, even though he may have reached actionlessness, has still to do duty for the sake of others. As a seeing man walks before a row of the blind, similarly, the sage exhibits the nature of duty to others by practising it himself. How else could the ignorant know the true path, if it were not to be shown to them by such a man? (Jnanesvari III. 155-158)

(Page 98-99, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 805

...virtue consists in bringing happiness to another without speaking evil words to him. Just as a philosopher's stone makes an iron ball a ball of gold without reducing its weight; as water goes down in the first instance to the roots of a tree, but incidentally it also helps the grass to grow; similarly, when a man is speaking with one, he should benefit all. (Jnanesvari XVII. 216-223)

(Page 96, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 804

True sacrifice is that in which there is no attachment to the fruit of it... (Jnanesvari XVII. 170-184)

(Page 94-95, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 803

virtue of equanimity...(such a man) is pleased with what good befalls him. He is not displeased with loss, as the Ocean does not dry up because there is no rain. (Jnanesvari XII. 197-213)

(Page 94, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 802

The ether inside a pitcher that is broken meets the ether in the sky; similarly, when bodily egoism is destroyed, the Individual Soul is Brahman. (Jnanesvari VI. 81-84)

(Page 94, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 801

...dispassion is the necessary condition of the pursuit of God. "Before a man can hope to find God, we must first see whether dispassion has been created in him. Even if a man be of small age, still if he has blossomed in the spring of dispassion, he will not take much time to bear the fruit of God-realization. (Jnanesvari VI. 47-50)

(Page 93, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)


Week 800

...a man should live in utter detachment, for fear that separation with objects of sense will bring calamity and grief. (Jnanesvari XIII. 536-590)

(Page 81, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 799

...as regards the evils of old age, he should contemplate them even while youth is still on him...One should talk good words before one becomes dumb. One should do acts of charity before the hands become crippled. In general, one should think about spiritual knowledge, before such a condition befalls and the mind becomes idiotic. (Jnanesvari XIII. 536-590)

(Page 80-81, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 798

Un-Egoism...As trees fructify in due season and yet are not conscious of their fructification, similarly, he does actions unconsciously. (Jnanesvari XIII. 525-534)

(Page 79, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 797

Un-Egoism...Such a man is quite punctilious in doing his daily duties according to his caste or order, but does not cherish in his heart the thought that he is doing those actions. (Jnanesvari XIII. 525-534)

(Page 79, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

(dictionary meaning of punctilious : attentive to formality or etiquette, precise in behaviour)

Week 796

...an elephant carest a bit when he is attacked with flowers; similarly, a steadfast man does not care when he is blamed with evil words. (Jnanesvari XIII. 485-498)

(Page 78, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 795

... he (devotee) must regard himself fortunate that he is not maimed of body so as to be prevented from engaging in Bhajana; fortunate is he that he is not blind; fortunate is he that he is not lame; fortunate is he that he is not dumb; fortunate is he that he is not idle, for he would have been otherwise uselessly fed; fortunate is he that he is entertaining real love for his master; it is for these reasons, says Jnanesvara, that he has been nourishing his body in order that he might do spiritual service to his Teacher (Jnanesvari XIII. 442-459)

(Page 77, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 794

The Guru must be his (devotee) place of pilgrimage; the Guru his deity, the Guru his mother and father;........the only thing that ought to fill the mouth of such a devotee, is the Mantra which his Guru has taught him; he should hold no book in his hands which does not contain the words of his master; the water which has touched his Guru's feet he should regard as superior in spiritual efficacy to the waters of any place of pilgrimage in the world; when he gets a morsel of food which his Guru has thrown before him, he should regard even spiritual ecstasy as insignificant as compared with it; in order that he should enjoy the happiness of atonement, he should accept on his head the dust that is raised when his Guru walks;......when a man becomes full of these qualities, he becomes the sole abode of spiritual realization. Knowledge lives by him; in fact, he is the God of whom Knowledge is the devotee;......and Jnanesvara goes on to give his personal experience that he has been longing for the service of the Guru as implied in the above statement...... (Jnanesvari XIII. 442-459).

(Page 76-77, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 793

...he (devotee) should feel himself of a high lineage on account of his Guru, and must find his nobility in the good actions of his brother-pupils; his sole absorbing topic should be the constant service of his Guru; the line which his Guru lays down for carrying on his spiritual work, he should regard as binding upon him... (Jnanesvari XIII. 442-459).

(Page 76, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 792

...so long as the body lasts, the disciple must be full of the spirit of service, and when the body is departing, he should consider that his ashes must be mixed with the earth where stand the feet of his Guru. (Jnanesvari XIII. 431-436).

(Page 76, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 791

The devotee must be so full of service to his Guru that, in mere wonder, the Guru may say to him, 'Ask any blessings of me'; and when the Guru becomes thus pleased, the devotee should ask, 'Let me translate myself into thy attendants, my Lord; I should shape myself into all the instruments of thy worship (Jnanesvari XIII. 404-408).

(Page 76, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 790

When shall I be relieved of my sufferance, he (devotee) asks, when may I be able to see my Guru ? He verily regards a moment spent without the Guru as greater than a world-cycle. When any person brings some news from the Guru, or when the Guru himself sends some word to him, he feels as if a dead man should come to life again; as a poor man should see a great treasure, or a blind man should be restored to his sight, or as a poor beggar may be made to sit on the throne of Indra, similarly when he hears of his Guru, he is filled with great happiness  (Jnanesvari XIII. 369-383)

Week 789

God is the mover of the world. The forces of nature are merely his bond servants.

(Page 54, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 788

As a river should move towards the ocean with all the wealth of its water, or as revelation should finally rest in the Name of God, similarly the devotee is he who resigns all his things to the care of the Guru, and makes himself the temple of devotion... (Jnanesvari XIII. 369-383)

(Page 75, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 787

Straightforward man ... his mind does not change from man to man, nor his conduct; he holds in bonds of friendship the whole world from time immemorial, and he does not know how to distinguish between himself and others; like a full-blossomed lotus, there is no cranny in his heart; his mind is as straight as a downward streak of honey. A straightforward man is the habitat of all these marks. (Jnanesvari XIII. 356-367)

(Page 75, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 786

The ideal sage ... raises his hand only to show protection; he stretches his hand only to succour the fallen; he moves his hand only to touch the afflicted; and he does this all so lovingly that even the southern wind might be regarded as harsh when contrasted with his mildness. (Jnanesvari XIII. 278-290)

(Page 74, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 785

An unpretentious man ...... never brings out his charity and merit into the broad-daylight. (Jnanesvari XIII. 203-217)

(Page 73, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 784

An humble man is he who regards all existences from the ant to the highest god as identical with his own Self; to him there is nothing great or small; there is no distinction between animate and inanimate; and he regards all things as his own Self
(Jnanesvari IX. 221-227).

(Page 72, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 783

Only he can hope to know God, who turns his back from the requirements of sense......

(Page 66, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 782

...one must leave away all the pride of body, and wealth, and virtue and then seek God (Jnanesvari IX. 367-381)

(Page 66, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 781

There is ... no difference between Natura Naturans and Nature Naturata. Are there not different limbs on the same body, asks Jnanesvara ? Are there not high and low branches on a tree, sprouting from the same seed ? I am related to the objects, as waves related to the sea. The fire and the flame are both of them really the fire. If the world were to hide in Me, what shall we say illumines the world? Can the lustre of a jewel hide the jewel ? Thus it would be vain to deny the world to find Me; for it is in the world that I am to be found. (Jnanesvari XIV. 118-128)

(Page 65, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 780

The wise man is he who sees no difference, but instead sees identity everywhere. If one notices only the difference of names, the difference of actions, and the difference of apparel, he will be born over and over again. From the same creeper are born fruits, longish, crooked, and circular, each with its own use. Thus beings may differ, and yet the same reality inhabit them all......Even when these beings vanish, the Atman does not vanish; as when the ornaments disappear, gold does not disappear........It is only the man who realizes this, who may be said to have his eye of knowledge opened. (Jnanesvari VIII. 1059-1080)

(Page 65, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 779

Jnanesvara describes how it is possible for a spiritual aspirant to cross the flood of unreality (Maya) ...It is only those who are full of devotion to me, for whom the Guru acts as a steersman, and who take recourse to the raft of Self-realization, for such we may say the flood of Maya ceases to exist even before they have tried to cross it. (Jnanesvari III. 68-98)

(Page 61-62, Chapter III, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 778

Ekanatha asks us very often "if Sanskrit was made by God, was Prakrit born of thieves and knaves ? Let these errings of vanity alone. Whether it is Sanskrit or Prakrit, wherever the story of God is told, it is essentially holy and must be respected......God is no partisan of tongues. To Him, Prakrit and Sanskrit are alike.

(Page 258, Chapter XIII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 777

Ekanatha gives Bhakti, Knowledge, Renunciation and Meditation as the four means of God-realisation. Bhakti he defines as intense love, and Knowledge as the firm belief in the identity of the finite self and the infinite self. Renunciation is defined as a feeling of strong disgust which contemptuously treats a damsel like Urvashi or a heap of jewels, as if they were like a blade of grass (The Bhagavata of Ekanatha XIX. 347-352,355). In addition to these, he lays stress in various places on the path of 'meditation'. Let concentration be actuated by love, hate or fear. If a man concentrates his body, mind, and speech upon one object, he is sure, in course of time, to be so transformed as to be one with the object.

...the wonderful power of 'meditation'...will not the meditation of God, who is Self-effulgent, by a man, who is sentient and lives on the intellectual plane, transform him into God ? (The Bhagavata of Ekanatha IX. 236-244).

(Page 248, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 776

In the seventh Adhyaya of the Bhagavadgita occurs the famous four-fold classification of the Bhaktas, the distressed, the seeker for knowledge, the lover of gain, and the knower of truth. Ekanatha tries to explain the classification further. ...(1)... He says the distressed, in the discussion of spiritual knowledge, does not mean one afflicted with the pains of a disease. Here the suffering or disease is the intense excitement of the mind for God-realisation. The divinely distressed is so keen, and grows so impatient, that being unable to suffer the pangs of separation from God, he runs to a mountain-precipice to throw himself down, or rushes forth to throw himself in a burning fire. This impatience for God-realisation is the true characteristic of the spiritually distressed. ...(2)...Finding him prepared to commit suicide, the other, the seeker for knowledge, asks him to note that this human life is given to him by God not for self-destruction, but for patient work towards His attainment. He must look at the way by which the devotees of bygone times have been able to obtain God's favour. He says to him "What is the use of throwing away this golden opportunity ? Suicide will not bring you nearer God." Such an advice somewhat cools down the impatience of the divinely distressed man and he tries to understand how his predecessors on the spiritual path persevered in their attempts. This is the second stage, or the desire to know. ...(3)...Love of gain in this case does not mean love of money, for money is a definite obstacle in the path of the aspirant. The true love of gain means the expectation to find God everywhere. He is a true lover of gain, who tries to see God even when he meets an infinite variety of objects. ...(4)...The knower, of course, means not one who is well versed in the worldly affairs or scriptures, but he who has realised Brahman (The Bhagavata of Ekanatha XIX. 272-280).

(Page 246-247, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 775

He is not a true devotee whose eye is set on worldly honours and worldly objects, and who simply externally engages himself in doing a service to God. A true Bhakta is lost in the thought of God, and day and night remembers Him alone.

(Page 246, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 774

Ekanatha defines Bhakti as the deep and sincere love for God. To be widely known in the world as a great devotee is an easy task. But to be a true and sincere devotee of God is a very difficult one.

(Page 246, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 773

So long as a mango tree has fruits on it, it is not simply desirable but even essential that it must have a watchman to guard it. But once the fruits are ripe and are removed to the owner's house, the watchman may be safely dispensed with. Similarly, so long as a man is under the influence of Avidya, it is binding upon him that he should obey the orders of the Vedas. But once a man has transcended body-consciousness, his soul being merged in Brahman, he may be said to have transcended also the limitations of Vedic orders. (E.B XIII.474-75)

(Page 244, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 772

...because it is possible to learn positively or negatively from almost everything in the world, in a sense, the whole world may be said to be full of Teachers. Only a man must have the will to learn. (E.B VII.341-344)

(Page 243, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 771

Mind is its own friend or foe, as the bamboo is the cause of both its growth and destruction. The striking and rubbing of one branch of a bamboo against another produces a spark of fire that burns a whole forest of bamboos. Mind may destroy itself similarly, if it so thinks. The best means for its control is thus to make it our friend through the grace of the Guru, who alone can control it. (E.B XXIII.684-691)

(Page 243, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 770

It is proverbial that the human mind is naturally full of many vices. But it has one saving feature. If it chooses to secure Divine Grace for man, it can certainly do so.

(Page 243, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 769

This unconquerable mind is, as it were, a maid-servant of the Guru, and it is at his beck and call. If, therefore, it is handed over to the control of the Guru, it shall give the aspirant the contentment and bliss which it alone can give.

(Page 243, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 768

When once a man truly repents for his follies, he is sure to feel disgusted for past life, and thus to renounce the old ways of life.

(Page 242, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 767

He who loves money and is conquered by woman is shunned by God, who lives in the temple of the body (E.B XXIII.305-307)

(Page 241, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 766

He is the seat of doubt, whose mind is maddened by attachment to wealth and woman. He becomes a stranger to worldly happiness; then what of divine life !!

(Page 241, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 765

The first thing, an aspirant must be free from, is attachment to wealth and woman. Let alone divine life; even the ordinary and worldly life would become unhappy, if a man has a strong attachment to these.

(Page 241, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 764

For the attainment of the non-perception of this duality of virtue and vice in others, man must cultivate another but closely allied virtue of enduring abuse from others. Why should a man ever think of retaliation or revenge, when a man who slanders is but his own reflex? Suppose a man's teeth were to press against his own tongue. With who shall he be angry ? In a fit of anger, will he root out the teeth, or cut off his tongue ? Surely, nothing like this will be done, because a man understands that both tongue and the teeth are after all a part of himself. He who suffers a fall by a sudden collision with another may easily have reason to be provoked against the latter. But suppose a man walks carefully, and his foot slips and he falls down. In this case with whom will he be angry ? A man in such a case simply looks down through shame, and resumes his course. A true Sadhu, similarly, suffers calmly the slanders of others, because he has realized his oneness with the universe. He will never allow himself to be over-ruled by the passion of anger or revenge (E.B XXIII.778-781)

(Page 240-241, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 763

According to Ekanatha, another very important virtue which an aspirant must cultivate is the virtue of bearing with the defect of others. In the description of virtues, but especially in the description of this and the next, the very life of Ekanatha seems to be reflected. To attend to the faults or defects in others is the worst of all faults in men. Virtue consists in not observing either the vice or virtue in others. If Brahman truly transcends the duality of vice and virtue, he who is prone to notice the faults or merits in others can be safely declared not to have attained to a true realisation of Brahman. Divine experience will forsake a man who attends to the vices or virtues in others. In a total solar eclipse , the stars become visible to the human eye even by day. Similarly, when this duality is visible, it can be safely inferred that the divinity is absent in men. The perception of duality can, therefore, be regarded as the sure sign of the prevalence of ignorance. (E.B XIX.574-579)

(Page 240, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 762

... if inside the mind is purified by the words of the Guru, that purity is sure to reveal itself through external activities.

(Page 239, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 761

As gold purified in a crucible shines bright, so the constant meditation on the teachings of the Guru makes the mind pure, and bright with spiritual lustre.

(Page 239, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 760

The sine qua non of spiritual life is purity, internal as well external. The mind becomes impure by contact with evil desires. So long as it is not purified, all talk of spiritual life is useless.

(Page 239, Chapter XII, History of Indian Philosophy In Eight Volumes, Vol 7, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 759


Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 26 of 26

...absence of pride consists in being bashful of one's greatness as the Ganges, when it descended on the head of Śaṅkara, contracted its volume of water.

(Page 91, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)


Week 758


Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 25 of 26

Love towards all is exhibited as by the water of a holy river, which destroys all sin and suffering as it moves on, nourishes the trees on its banks, and ultimately discharges itself into the ocean. As the Sun destroys the blindness of the world, opens temples of lustre, and moves on encircling the universe, similarly the man, who bears love towards all, unloosens those who are bound, helps those who are sunk, and relieves those who suffer and are miserable. Day and night, his primary aim is to achieve the happiness of the human kind, and only secondarily does he care for his own interest, not to speak of any efforts made for the attainment of his end, when that action is sure to bring evil to the world.

(Page 90, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 757

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 24 of 26

Purity is like that of a golden pitcher, thoroughly cleaned from the outside, and filled inside with the water of the Ganges. It consists in doing actions without reference to results on the outside, and in maintaining perfect discrimination from the inside.

(Page 90, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 756

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 23 of 26

Courage is exhibited in withstanding the flood-gates of sensual impulse, or in putting up with any disease that one's misfortune makes one suffer, or in meeting an evil fate. A courageous man stands more boldly than the sage Agastya, even though all these misfortunes may come upon him simultaneously as in a great flood. Just as a small motion of wind dissipates even a lengthy column of smoke in the sky, similarly, a courageous man bears all mental, physical, or accidental evils, and even on occasions of great mental disturbance preserves his absolute equanimity.

(Page 90, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 755

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 22 of 26

Sufferance is absence of pride in having become great by being obliged to suffer evils, as the body which carries the hair on itself does not know that it is so carrying them.

(Page 90, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 754

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 21 of 26

Spiritual lustre is that quality which does not allow a man to lessen his courage, when one is trying to reach God by the Yoga method of realization...It consists in naturally and determinately following the pathway to God, irrespective of any obstruction from jural or social commandment...

(Page 90, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 753

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 20 of 26

...the absence of fickleness is like that of the doll which ceases to throw out its hands and feet, when once its inner thread is taken away. It consists in reclaiming our senses by conquering the Prāṇa. As when the sun sets, all the rays are absorbed in it, similarly, when the mind is conquered, all the senses become one with it. Hence when the mind and breath have been conquered, all the senses become powerless. In this powerlessness of all the senses consists the constancy of mind.

(Page 90, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 752

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 19 of 26

Bashfulness...consists in the reflection that there is no use in coming to birth and dying from time to time...

(Page 89, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 751

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 18 of 26

Softness is like that of the bees when they are touching their hive, or of the sea-animals when they are swimming through waters, or of the birds when they are moving in the sky.

(Page 89, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 750

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 17 of 26

Uncovetousness is like that of the Sun, who, even though the lotus may follow him, yet does not touch the other's beauty; or like that of the spring, which even though it may be the cause of the entire beauty of the forest, yet does not partake of it; or like that of God Vishnu, who does not mind even though Lakshmi comes to him with all the Siddhis. The uncovetous man, in short, cares nothing for the enjoyment of the sensual objects of this world or of the next.

(Page 89, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 749

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 16 of 26

Compassion is like the broad moonlight which sends a cooling influence without considering the great and the small. Compassion is exhibited most by water, which destroys itself in order to maintain the life of grass. Even if one sacrifices oneself wholly by looking at the misery of others, one should consider that one has not yet played one's part completely. He should feel distressed at the misery of others, as when a thorn rushing into the foot makes the whole body ache, and as when the foot is rubbed with cool oil, the coolness goes to the eye, similarly when others become happy, one ought to grow happy. That man is compassion incarnate, whose life is meant merely for the relief of the sufferance of the afflicted, even as water is meant for the quenching of the thirst of those who are thirsty.

(Page 89, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 748

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 15 of 26

Goodness is, for example, exhibited by the physician who has no partiality for his or others’ people, and whose one desire is to conquer the onset of disease before it passes out of control...When others’ faults leap to the eye, one should cover them and then look at them.

(Page 88-89, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 747

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 14 of 26

Tranquillity has an analogue in the destruction of the knower, the knowledge, and the known, all equally, as when the infinite flood of water at the time of the Great End, having eclipsed the existence of the world, makes the spring, the stream, and the ocean, all equally disappear.

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 746

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 13 of 26

Sacrifice consists in leaving away all contact with the world, after having killed the egoism of the body by means of the intellect.

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 745

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 12 of 26 (continued)

Suka was never afflicted with passion even though he saw the beautiful form of Rambha. Even though ghee is poured upon ashes, it does not produce a flame of fire.

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 744

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 12 of 26

Non-anger is that quality of the heart, which, like a stone, upon which water is poured, does not yet sprout like a plant......A serpent’s slough may be trodden under foot, and yet it raises no fang. 

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 743

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 11 of 26

Jñāneśvara gives us a good analysis of the conception of truth. Truth is as piercing and as mild as the unblown Jasmine flower, or as the light of the Moon which is nevertheless cool. It might be again compared to a medicine, which destroys disease as soon as it is seen, and which is not to the slightest degree pungent to the taste. But such a medicine does not exist, and so truth is incomparable. It is like water which does not pain the eye even though it is put inside it; which, on the other hand, has the power of breaking the precipices of mountains. It ought to be as piercing as iron in dispelling doubts; and in point of being heard it eclipses sweetness itself.......By its sweetness it deceives nobody; and by its straightforwardness it pains nobody. On the other hand, the huntsman’s song is sweet to the ear, and yet it is death to the deer. Also, truth must not be like a siren’s song, which is sweet to hear, but which, when meditated upon, breaks the heart. Truth is the mother’s quality who becomes angry but does not mean ill.

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 742

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 10 of 26

Non-injury consists in making the body, speech, and mind exist only for the happiness of the world.

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 741

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 9 of 26

Straightforwardness consists, according to him, in being good to all beings, as milk is good to a child, or as the soul exists in all beings equally.

(Page 88, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 740

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 8 of 26

...by penance is meant emaciation of one’s limbs and body for the sake of Self-realization, just as incense is burnt in fire, or gold loses its weight in the process of purification, or the moon wanes in the dark half of the month.

(Page 87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 739

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 7 of 26

The Brahmin may study the Brahma Sutras, others may recite a hymn, or sing the name of God. A repetition of any of these things in order to attain to God may be called spiritual practice, which is the next virtue.

(Page 87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 738

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 6 of 26

The next virtue, namely, sacrifice, consists in dutifully offering to God whatever is best...Everyone can sacrifice in this way by only attending to his proper duties; only he must not be infected with the poison of the fruit of actions.

(Page 87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 737

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 5 of 26

Self-restraint consists in separating the senses from their objects, as water may be cleaned by means of the Nivali seed; it consists in not allowing the objects to influence the senses by giving these latter in the hands of self-control,……in filling all the ten senses with the fire of dispassion, and finally, in making the body succumb to severe duties as incessant as inspiration and expiration.

(Page 87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 736

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 4 of 26

Charity consists in sacrificing oneself in mind and wealth to an afflicted man, just as a tree offers itself wholly to a passenger in the street by its shade, or by its flowers, fruits, roots, or leaves.

(Page 87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 735

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 3 of 26

The third virtue, namely, fixity of knowledge, consists in making the mind full of the desire for the attainment of Ãtman.

(Page 87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 734

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)


Thought 2 of 26

The second virtue, namely, purity, consists in keeping the heart as pure as the waters of the Ganges before the onset of the rainy season and after the end of the hot season.......It consists in making the intellect united with God-head and in keeping the mind unmoved by the senses...

(Page 86-87, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)


Week 733

Virtues that constitute a divine heritage (according to Jñāneśvara)

Thought 1 of 26

Jñāneśvara tells us that the first virtue is fearlessness. It consists in not being afraid of sansāra, because the egoism in reference to action and non-action has already been killed. It also consists in throwing away all feeling of fear, in the firm belief of the unity of all things and the identification of another with oneself. If water tries to drench salt, the salt itself becomes water. Hence when one has experienced the unity of all things, fear vanishes immediately.

(Page 86, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 732

As regards the criterion of Bhakti, Nārada teaches that it is "Svayampramāna": the criterion of Bhakti is in itself. Complete peace and complete happiness are its characteristics. "Anubhava" which is the practical index of Bhakti should increase from moment to moment. It ought to be permanent. It ought to be subtle. While the psycho-physical characteristics of Bhakti are, that it should make the throat choked with love, should make the hair stand on end, and should compel divine tears from meditating eyes. When, therefore, complete happiness and peace are enjoyed, when "Anubhava" is attained, when all the psycho-physical effects are experienced, then alone is true Bhakti generated. They are the criteria of Bhakti.

(Page 14, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 731

He (Narada) tells us that it (Bhakti) is of eleven kinds. It consists of singing the qualities of God, a desire to see His form, worshipping the image of God, meditation on Him, the service of God, friendship with God, affection towards God, love to God as to a husband, surrender of one's own Self to God, atonement with God, and the agony of separation from God.

(Page 14, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 730

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 10 of 10

The devotee should be careless of the censure of others, and should have no anxiety whatsoever while he meditates.

(Page 14, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 729

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 9 of 10

He should not give himself up to argumentation; for there is no end to argumentation. It is manifold, and cannot be bridled.

(Page 14, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 728

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 8 of 10

He should deliberately set himself to transform his natural emotions, and make them divine. Passion and anger and egoism, he should transform and utilize for the service of God. In fact, a divine transformation of all the natural emotions must take place in him.

(Page 13-14, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)


Week 727

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 7 of 10

He should cultivate the virtues of non-injury, truth, purity, compassion, and belief in God.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 726

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 6 of 10

Hypocrisy and arrogance, he should shun as foul dirt.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 725

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 5 of 10

He should live in solitude, should not care for livelihood, should not hear of women, should not think about wealth, should not associate with thieves.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 724

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 4 of 10

He should spend his life in serving the good.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 723

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 3 of 10

He should pray for the grace of the Saints and the grace of God; and God will appear and bestow upon him spiritual experience in course of time, which, Narada thinks, can be attained only by God's grace.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 722

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 2 of 10

He should give himself up to the study of the Bhaktisastras, and should not waste words in vain.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 721

What, according to Narada, are the moral requirements of a man who wishes to be a Bhakta?

Thought 1 of 10

He should, in the first place, leave all enjoyments, leave all contact with objects of sense, incessantly meditate on God without wasting a single minute, and always hear of God's qualities.

(Page 13, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 720

Prahlada...supplies another example of a pure and disinterested love to God, so that he is able to say to God when he sees Him - "I am Thy disinterested Devotee. Thou art my disinterested Master. But if Thou wishest to give me any boon at all, bestow upon me this, that no desire should ever spring up within me".

(Page 8, Chapter I, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 719

...the surest criterion of Mysticism is the validity of the experience as enjoyed by the mystic himself. Before that, there is no appeal; for it, there is no criterion. If he appears to be true to himself, if his whole life is an embodiment of absolute right and truth, if he does not deviate an inch from the path of goodness and virtue, if his whole life is dedicated to the contemplation of God and the service of Humanity, if he regards his own mystical advancement as a step towards the realisation of either of these ends, then we do not think that a mystic's search after God and its validity need be much called into question. It is this personal aspect of a mystic's spiritual realisation which stamps it with a peculiar halo and worth.

(Preface, Page 29-30, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 718

St. Teresa...speaks of the peace, calm, and good fruits in the soul by contemplation on God, and particularly of three graces: "The first is a perception of the greatness of God, which becomes clearer to us as we witness more of it. Secondly, we gain self-knowledge and humility as we see how creatures so base as ourselves in comparison with the Creator of such wonders, have dared to offend Him in the past, or venture to gaze on Him now. The third grace is a contempt of all earthly things unless they are consecrated to the service of so great a God" (The Interior Castle, 6. 5. 12).

(Preface, Page 28, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 717

...a true life of Mysticism teaches a full-fledged morality in the individual, and a life of absolute good to the society.

(Preface, Page 27, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 716

Mystical phenomena are a necessary accompaniment of mystical life. But what constitutes the essence of mystic realisation is not these mystical phenomena themselves, but an unfaltering, unbending, unending love of God.

(Preface, Page 21, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 715

Whenever difficulties overcome us, whenever we are down with the worries of life, we should meditate on the Name of God. By the Name of God are all our difficulties dispelled, and all our calamities swept away.

(Preface, Page 16, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 714

Ramadasa tells us that “the Ideal Saint is he who has left no desires in him, and has no passion in him; his desires are centred in the Self. He has no reason for logic-chopping, nor does he bear hatred, or jealousy, towards others. When he has seen the Self, he has no reason for grief, or infatuation, or fear. God indeed is beyond these, and the Self becomes assimilated to God”.

(Preface, Page 11, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 713

Ruysbroeck tells us that "the most inward man must live his life in these two ways, namely, in work and in rest; in each, he must be whole and undivided, and is perpetually called by God to renew both his rest and his work". Indeed "he is a living and willing instrument of God, with which God works whatsoever He will, and howsoever He will. He is thus strong and courageous in suffering all that God allows to befall him, and is ready alike for contemplation and action" (Adornment, ii, 65).

(Preface, Page 5, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 712

Whatever we spiritually visualise is ourselves. According to the mystical law, whatever a mystic perceives at any time by any form of sense corresponds exactly to the stage of development of his own spiritual temper and capacity. The Sanskrit expression – tatvamasi – tells us exactly that what a mystic sees is, really, what he is, and that his spiritual status is to be measured by what he is able to see.

(Part I, Chapter V, Page 246, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 711

...the meaning of Bhakti is clear - attachment, devotion, one-pointed love towards the object of adoration or worship.

(Page 172, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 710

Mental impulse has its origin in mind, and then it comes over to speech, or sight, or the motor organs; when the mind’s mindness is departed, the senses lose their rigour, as without a wire-puller the dolls cease to throw out their hands and feet.

(Page 74, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 709

The size of a plantain tree looks small, and yet it is rich in fruits which are full of sweetness; a cloud looks as if it may be blown by a wind, but it sends down rain in plenty. By these marks must one know a man who takes pride in unpretentiousness (The Jnanesvari, XIII.203-217).

(Page 73, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 708

A humble man is he, says Jnanesvara…even though people may praise him for the qualities which he really possesses, such a man is disturbed, as much as a deer is disturbed when it is surrounded by a hunter; and oppressed, as when a man feels oppressed when he is trying to swim his way through a whirlpool.

(Page 72, Chapter III, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)
 
Week 707

"The Atman," says the Chhandogya Upanishad, "is sinless, without age, without death, without fear, without any hunger or thirst and has all his desires or ends fulfilled. This Atman should be sought after; this Atman should be known. He who realises the Atman in this way after having sought after him, for him all the worlds are gained, and all desires fulfilled."

(Chapter VII, Page 256, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 706

...we are told in the Taittiriya Upanishad that the direct result of the enjoyment of divine bliss is that the Mystic is divested once for all of all feeling of fear. The one kind of emotion kills the other, and the feeling of bliss kills once for all the emotion of fear. Whom and what may such a perfected Mystic fear, when he finds infinite joy in all directions and at all times?  “He becomes fearless,” says the Taittiriya Upanishad, “because he has obtained a lodgment in that invisible, incorporate, indefinable, fearless, supportless support of all”.

(Chapter VII, Page 255, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 705

...man's endeavours after a full-fledged realisation of God may always fall short of the ideal, unless Grace comes from above.

(Chapter VII, Page 252, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 704

…it is necessary that the Teacher to whom we go to seek wisdom must have realised his identity with the ultimate Self. For, unless the Teacher has realised such an identity, unless, in other words, he stands on the lofty pedestal of unitive experience, the knowledge which he can impart can never be expected to be fructified in any individual who receives it.

(Chapter VI, Page 242-243, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 703

The Kathopanishad believing in the natural descent of spiritual knowledge from a higher to a lower level tells us that "unless the spiritual teacher be really of a superior calibre, spiritual knowledge would be hard of attainment, and again, that unless the initiation comes from a Spiritual Teacher who has realised his identity with the Self, there can be no knowledge of the subtle path which transcends all power of logic and argumentation."

(Chapter VII, Page 242, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 702

"Unless a man feels disgusted with the worlds to which his actions may bring him, and unless he believes firmly that the world which is beyond the reach of actions can never be obtained by any actions howsoever good," unless, in other words, he regards the life of Self-realisation as uniquely superior to the life of action, "he has no right to enter into the spiritual world, to seek which he must forthwith go in a humble spirit, fuel in hand, to a Spiritual Teacher who has realised the Self".

(Chapter VII, Page 241-242, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 701

..in the Muktikopanishad we have a passage where we are told that the river of desire runs between the banks of good and bad, but that, by the effort of our will, we should compel it to move in the direction of the good....

(Chapter VI, Page 230, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)


Week 700

Charity should be practised with Faith, and not with Un-Faith, with Magnanimity, with Modesty, with Awe and with Sympathy.

(Chapter VI, Page 227, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 699

We are told that the chief virtues of man are austerity, charity, straightforwardness, harmlessness and truthfulness: these according to Ghora Angirasa constitute the chief virtues of man.

(Chapter VI, Page 226, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 698

Great happiness consists in seeing, hearing, and meditating upon the Atman. Little happiness consists in seeing, hearing and meditating upon other things besides the Atman. Great happiness is immortal; Little happiness is perishable.

(Chapter VI, Page 223, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 697

...the life of bare contemplation and the life of bare activity are alike fraught with evil; but...he alone may be said to attain the goal of life who knows how to harmonise the two different paths.

(Chapter VI, Page 219, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 696

"That which the ear does not hear, but that which enables us to perceive the ear, that which breath is not able to breathe, but that by which breath itself is breathed, know that to be the final reality."

(Chapter V, Page 193, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 695

"That which the eye is unable to see, but that which enables us to see the eye, know that to be the ultimate reality."

(Chapter V, Page 193, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 694

"That which the mind is unable to think, but which thinks the mind, know that to be the ultimate reality."

(Chapter V, Page 193, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 693

"That which speech is unable to give out, but that which itself gives out speech, know that to be the ultimate reality, not that which people worship in vain."

(Chapter V, Page 193, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 692

It is not necessary for one to go out. God is inside us. God is here, there, and everywhere.

(Part I, Chapter III, Page 101, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 691

"Leave away your arrogance, Oh foolish man," says Surdas, "spiritual life alone will save you from helpless submission to death. Let your mind rest steadfastly on the feet of God."

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 42, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 690

If you want to translate your grief into joy, says Surdas, you must necessarily take recourse to the contemplation of God.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 42, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 689

...all things are in mutuum commercium, because they are bound together by the same vinculum substantiale, namely the Self.

(Chapter I, Page 36, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 688

As all the spokes are contained between the axle and felly of a wheel, all things and all selves are connected in and through the Supreme Self. It is on account of the Supreme Self, that all things stand related together. All things appear on the background of this eternal curtain.

(Chapter I, Page 36, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 687

Atman is both great and small; greater than the great, and smaller than the small; infinite and infinitesimal.

(Chapter I, Page 35, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 686

...fate alone betakes a man in the next world for which he has paved the way by his works in this life.

(Chapter I, Page 35, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 685

Nobody can attain Brahman unless he is humble at heart.

(Chapter I, Page 25, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 684

...Atman...is the cause of all good and evil actions in this world, and...all human beings are merely instruments in His hands.

(Chapter I, Page 19, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 683

Unless...we make an active effort for the realisation of our ideal, it will continually fly from us like an ignis-fatuus.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 357 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 682

A spiritual teacher performs for his disciple the same functions which a potter performs for his pot. In the first place, he takes away all the depressions and protuberances of his jar, and rounds off all its angularities. In the second place, he enlarges the potential vacuum of the pot, and gives it the shape and size he wills.
In a similar manner, a spiritual teacher takes away all the defects and deficiencies of his disciple's mind, enlarges his receptivity, and makes of him a worthy disciple capable of performing the functions he wills.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 336 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 681

The very moment that the disciple comes under the grace of his spiritual teacher, he finds the door of
liberation open to him.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 336 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 680

The second function which a 'sikligar' performs is that he takes away all rust from the iron instruments; similarly, the spiritual teacher takes away all the dirt and rust of passions and desires from the mind of his disciple.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 335 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 679

The function of a 'sikligar' is to sharpen instruments of iron or steel; so does the Guru sharpen the mental instrument of his disciple.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 335 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 678

The tomb and the Samadhi of Kabir which exist at Maghar will stand as an eternal monument of the unity of spiritual realisation to be attained in Hinduism or Islam, and for that  matter in any other form of religion. The present writer is tempted to believe that the place should be called 'Agahar' instead of 'Maghar'. It is a place where our sins will be washed away, and which will, therefore, enable us to advance on the path of spiritual realisation.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 330-331 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 677

It was traditionally supposed that one who died at Maghar was born as an ass in his next birth. "By all means, then " said Kabir, "Let me die at Maghar, for I know that I have no future birth for me, far less that of an ass". A man who leads a sinful life, says Kabir, even if he dies at Banaras, cannot be saved. On the other hand, a virtuous man, though he died at Maghar, might escape the clutches of death.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 330 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 676

...it is the function of God eudaemonistically to combine the material and the spiritual welfare of his devotee.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 325 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 675

...the law of actions and consequences is paramount, and one who does good actions is sure to be rewarded some day - if not in this life, at least in a future existence...

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 287 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 674

Have you ever considered, O man, how you first came into your mother's womb, and then how you came out of it. In your third stage, you became an object of endearment for everybody and were consequently fondled. Later, in youth, you reached the zenith of your prosperity and power, and after having done all this, your ultimate fate is to be consigned as a mere mass of bones into a ravine, creek, or river. This should fill you with the consideration as to whether you have given a proper account of your life.

(Part II, Chapter I, Page 277 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 673

Mirabai thought herself fortunate that the spiritual instruction of her teacher was ever grafted on her. Her own tree, which was of an inferior variety, was, by the infusion, made capable of yielding a rich and delicious harvest. The inferior tree, in which the branch of a superior one is grafted, yields thereby richer and more plentiful fruit.

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 184-185 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 672

Jnaneshwar has told us that those persons alone deserve the title of Mahatma who worship God with ever-increasing devotion from day to day.

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 180 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 671

Kabir tells us that he would be never separated from his Lord, if once he was able to find Him. This is the promise which a devotee always makes to God in the beginning, but always breaks at the end. A great Kanarese saint has said...our devotion to God should never change the aspect it bore at the beginning of the search; on the other hand, it should deepen in intensity as it proceeds.

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 180 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 670

"My master, I have only dedicated to you what was already yours." If... spiritual process results in the ultimate dedication of our life and actions to God, what higher consummation could we ever hope to achieve ?

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 168 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 669

...we must take the cotton of our mind and take away all the dross and the dust out of it, all the evil propensities and all the evil passions - and then a sliver might be produced - Sharifsaheb

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 163 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 668

The sum and substance of Kabir's advice...engage...in...spiritual pursuit...without postponing...for a single moment...

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 162-163 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 667

...whatever emotions, or feelings, conceptions or aspirations, we might entertain about God, might as well be entertained about ... a spiritual teacher, who is His replica upon earth.

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 143-144 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 666

Kabir tells us that the great characteristic of a spiritual teacher is that he enables his disciple to abide in God.

(Part I, Chapter IV, Page 143 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 665

Whenever evil spreads in this world, whenever religion is threatened, whenever good people suffer and evil men prosper, then it behoves God to incarnate Himself in the form of an Avatara.

(Part I, Chapter III, Page 110 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 664

Meditation on the Name (mantrajaap) and Qualities (gunagaan) of God are related to God-love in terms of reciprocal causation. Unless we have mantrajaap and gunagaan, God-love cannot be created in us and unless the germ of God-love is in us we may not be tempted to, and certainly not succeed in carrying on our mantrajaap and gunagaan.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 97 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 663

Martineau has spoken of Reverence as the highest in the scheme of ethical virtues; with far greater force is this applicable to the reverence which we bear towards God or our spiritual teacher.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 97 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 662

The vision of God is not a matter of child-play; it requires long and patient toil (saburi).

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 94 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 661

Bhakti may be regarded as 'paramvyakulta' about God.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 86 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 660

...we have got three different kinds of Bhakti, enumerated both by Tulsidas and the Adhyatma Ramayana...the company of the saints, is the first virtue; the service of our spiritual teacher, constitutes the second; to regard one's spiritual teacher as higher than even the Godhead, the third.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 85 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 659

Every movement in the world of Nature and of man is to him (Nanak) a miracle worked by God.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 59 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 658

There is again, another very famous poem in Tulsidas, 'jaake priya na rama vaidehi', in which he points out how...(the) vision of God reacts on the saints, and binds them together with the vinculum of God-love.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 59 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 657

He (Nanak) says it was on account of the saints that he was able to have a continuous and unceasing vision of the one Sporting Lord...

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 58-59 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 656

All prosperity, all adversity, all good and bad happenings in the world take place on account of the will of God.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 58 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 655

In the history of thought, we have had many instances to support this reconciliation between the developing aspirant and the order of nature. All that is good to thee, O Nature, says the great Stoic philosopher, Marcus Aurelius, is good to me.

Week 654

...effect of the company of the saints is that it puts in the mind of the aspirant an attitude of reconciliation with the highest reality - call it Nature or call it God.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 57-58 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 653

A Brahmana (or Brahman-knower) must spend the major part of his time in the contemplation of God. It is his business always to be merged in God.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 56 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 652

A Brahmana (or Brahman-knower), according to Charandas, is one who has gained both moral and mystical perfection.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 56 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 651

Compassion is the chief insignia of ... Brahmanhood.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 56 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 650

Everyone knows that all our senses are extratropic, and it requires a great moral and spiritual power to turn them inward. Any one who is able to do this, says Charandas, should well be called a Brahamana.. Sex and anger have no place in the being of such a man.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 56 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 649

...the Bhagavadgita tells us...that we should deposit our actions in safe custody with God so that we might be recipients of His Grace.

(Page 179 , The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 648

...any one of the lower classes - the backward class, the depressed classes and Harijans - who might realise God might equally be entitled to the name of a Brahmana or Brahman-knower.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 55 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 647

It is only the virtue of 'Saburi' which will bring him (Fakir) to the attainment of his spiritual goal.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 54 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 646

A Fakir is he who, says Kabir, always remains merged in the happiness of God-contemplation. The happiness of God-contemplation he regards as higher than the happiness of Royalty or Sovereignty. His one resting place is in the city of Devotion.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 54 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 645

We should never try to please an ungodly man. There is no use in covering the body of an ass with a saffron or sandal paste...

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 50 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 644

...avoid the company of the wicked. We should have no concern with such ungodly men. They are like serpents whose venom-teeth would not give up secreting poison even if they are fed on milk.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 49 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 643

One of the most important ...virtues is the company of the good.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 48 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 642

Cultivation of the moral virtues also implies an avoidance of bad qualities...The first great vice is the company of the wicked; for it is the mother of all vices.

(Part I, Chapter II, Page 48 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 641

"You are indeed sitting in a wrecked boat with a hundred holes," says Jnaneshwar, "how can you hope to get comfort on the perilous journey? Life indeed is a fair, where the wares of misery are being spread out and allocated by fate. When you are seeing that conflagration is surrounding you in a forest, would it not be an act of prudence on your part to get out of it as early as possible ? "

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 46 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 640

Kabir tells us "Pilgrim as you are, you have not been able to reach even the outskirts of the City of Devotion, and you will have to return as you came. " Then he tells us..."You have taken an extremely heavy load on your head and are sitting on a wrecked boat. You are sure to get drowned in the river of life." Again he says "Your friend, God, is standing on the other side of the river. Why do you not make Him the pole-star of all your attention and effort ?"

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 43 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 639

It is only a contemplation on the Gracious Lord that will enable one to transcend the evils of life.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 34 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 638

"If you do not look out for, and avail yourself of, the everlasting Name of God ('satnaam'),"says Kabir, "you will have to repent deeply within yourself and descend by the downward ladder to the lowest rung of perdition."

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 34 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 637

Surdas...warns us to take thought that ...contemplation on death should make one think early enough about turning the body to its proper use...

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 28 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 636

...a man may commit sins, and throw the responsibility on God who is the maker of all things. Such an attitude to sin is absolutely irresponsible. It is only a facile way of escaping from one's own sins

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 19-20 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 635

Is it not our concern, as members of the Spiritual world, so to feel and pray within ourselves that Providence may bring about an adjustment between merit and reward ? If these are not righted, as we may see in the world, will it not be our spiritual endeavour so to will, that they are righted here and now ? At least the endeavour will inspire us with a strong spiritual impulse for bringing about this very necessary desired adjustment.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 18 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 634

...it is not by intellectual endeavour alone that we can hope to reach the Absolute.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 14 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 633

The greatness of the work of God...says Tulsidas, is ineffable.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 11 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 632

...Pythagoras...speaks of the three kinds of vocation being open to us. In this fair of life, he says, some people come to buy and sell. These are the economists. Others come to engage themselves in games. These are the politicians. Still others come to simply look on (theorein). These are the philosophers. What is the use of coming into this world if we are not able to visualise God ? Bacon has also lent his support to this doctrine of Pythagoras saying that in this mortal fair, our only profit should be God. Everything, in other words, except the pursuit of God is a vanity.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 10 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 631

We are all sleeping in this world, says Krishnanand, even though we seem to be awake. The poet wants us not to sleep to the extent of being unconscious; for who knows whether, pilgrims as we are, we may not be attacked by robbers, and thus lose all the capital which we may have brought ? The poet tells us that we have brought a great capital with us while coming into the world - by capital, he means the spiritual capital....The robbers of Krishnanand...might verily be our tumultuous and turbulent passions.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 8,10 Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 630

An oarsman, plying his boat in a torrential midstream, will be in a dangerous predicament, from which nothing can rescue him except the grace and power of God. Many times during the life of a man he finds all his efforts of no avail. It is in such a plight that he must call upon God to rescue him from the dangerous situations in which he might be placed. In this way alone could he escape from his blindness into the light of the Real.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 8, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 629

...howsoever powerful the effort a man might make, if nature and destiny conspire against him, he will find himself helpless before them, and nothing can rescue him except the grace of God..

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 7-8, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 628

...says Kabir, like Jnaneshwar also, "in this miserable world, which may well be compared to a forest in conflagration, the fool rushes hither and thither without finding a clue to get out of it." What is this clue ? That is the secret of the spiritual life. Unless one possesses the clue, one might not know what the way out might be.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 7, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 627

transcendence of intellect. Howsoever powerful the lamp a blind man may carry in his hand, he will never be able to search out what he desires. A greater instrument than that of intellect is required to search out a higher faculty which might give us the vision of the Real.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 7, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 626

A..characteristic, which is required for the search of the Real according to Kabir, is the virtue of absolute self-abnegation. Naked we come into this world, he says, and naked we pass away: The loin-cloth is merely a temporary vesture. It is only he, who can rid his mind of all sense of possession, that can rise to the sense of the Real.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 7, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 625

A skilled horseman riding an unruly horse might suffer a fall at any moment, says Kabir. ...Kabir ...points out that an uncontrolled mind riding an unruly body might cause a dangerous fall at any moment .

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 7, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 624

...unless he (spiritual seeker) resigns himself completely to the will of this Omnipotent Being, it may not be possible for him to pursue the spiritual path steadfastly, courageously and successfully.

(Part I, Chapter I, Page 4, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 623

The real meaning of Revelation seems to the present writer to be not any external message delivered to man from without, but a divine afflatus springing from within, the result of inspiration through god-intoxication.

(Chapter I , Page 6, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 622

"the ancient sages did not go in for a formal sacrifice knowing that an endless sacrifice was going on all the while within themselves"...that of a mental sacrifice - which is helpful to the process of the acquisition of spiritual knowledge.

(Chapter I , Page 5-6, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 621

Those who regard sacrifices as the highest good of human life, go again and again from old age to death...It is only those who practice penance...who tranquil their passions, lead the life of knowledge...it is only these that go to the immortal Atman...

(Chapter I , Page 5, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 620

when...the Atman has been realised, whom and what may anybody fear ? For whom and what may offerings be made ?

(Chapter I , Page 2, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 619

Asoka, in one of his Rock-Edicts, forbade the decrying of other people's faiths, - for in that way he said one was doing disservice to one's own faith, - and he taught the virtue of Concourse (Samavaya).

(Preface, Page xvii, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 618

...the Upanishads are capable of giving us a view of reality which would satisfy the scientific, the philosophic, as well as the religious aspirations of man; because they give us a view which may be seen to be supported by a direct, first-hand, intuitive, mystical experience, which no science can impeach, which all philosophy may point to as the ultimate goal of its endeavour, and which may be seen at once to be the immanent truth in the various forms of religion which only quarrel because they cannot converge.

(Chapter I, Page 1-2, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 617

In the twentieth century to-day...under the impact of Western civilisation and Western culture, supported by the infinite progress of modern science and an all-round study of the philosophies and religions of the world, we in India, who are the inheritors of a great spiritual past that has been left to us by our Upanashadic ancestors, stand face to face with a very difficult problem, namely, that of reconciling mysticism with intellectualism in such a way that any thought-construction that we might put forth on the basis of the eternal truths of Atmanic experience suggested to us by the Upanishads, might harmoniously synthesise the claims of Science and philosophy and Religion, so that our philosophical view of reality may not be disturbed but may only be supported by the advance of modern science, and both our scientific and philosophic views be made to rebound in such a way to the glory of God that "the highest link of Nature's chain may only be seen to be tied to the foot of Jupitor's Chair."

(Chapter I, Page 1, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 616

...it should be inconceivable how the world which is "pierced by Brahman through and through" should ever wear a pessimistic aspect

(Page xv, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 615

...in the first place...we cannot conceive of any bliss being negative, for it would be a contradiction in terms, and in the second place...this bliss is the same for all human beings...for where the same intellect and feeling and will have been ordained to mankind by God, He has also made provision for a like consummation in each case.

(Page xv, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 614

The "Cognoscendo ignorari" of Augustine, the "Neti Neti" of Yajnavalkya, the "Weder dies noch das" of Eckhart, would be far more sure indexes of spiritual humility, and consequent possession of reality, than the self-satisfied and half-halting dictates of an Agnosticism on the grounds of Pure Reason, which must destroy knowledge in order to make room for faith.

(Page xii, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 613

...a Sage, who has realised the Atman, must see the Atman in all human beings, must, in fact, regard all human beings as living in a Kingdom of Ends.

(Page xii, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 612

...the Sophists did not know that they did not know; Socrates knew that he did not know; Shuka did not know that he knew; and Kabir knew that he knew. This "knowledge" gave him the confidence that he had reached the highest state of beatification, and that he would never be born again.

(Page 401, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 611

'Hadd' belongs to the ordinary spiritual teacher, who reflexly mutters some 'mantra' in the ears of his disciple. The Guru of 'Behadd' transcends such a conception : 'kaan phoonka Guru haddka, behadd ka Guru Aur'...Kabir tells us that he is playing a game of spiritual cricket on the plains of the Limitless. All the players have only hit up to the boundary, he says, but he alone has been able to hit an over-boundary...'behadd ka maidaan'

(Page 403, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 610

beatification...In the Doha 'kabiraa hum Guru rasa piya', the slaking of spiritual thirst by ambrosial juice, says Kabir, automatically puts an end to all desires. 'jugaan jugaan ki trisha buzaati, karam bharam agha vyadhi tarai', says Kabir elsewhere also; but the putting to and end of all desires may mean only desirelessness, unless it becomes the vehicle for some higher conception. At many places in the Vedanta philosophy, liberation is explained as consisting in desirelessness. This is only a negative conception. Mere desirelessness, without a positive content, could not come up to the mark, as is required for the highest emancipation. Kabir tells us that this positive content is beatification. "I have drunk the cup of juice from my teacher", says Kabir, "I am absolutely satiated, and no desire now remains in me to be fulfilled". Satiety, or Beatification, therefore, seems to be the positive content behind desirelessness. Beatification as a result of the desirelessness produced by the ambrosial juice, would really be what an aspirant should seek to have.

(Page 399-400, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 609

When a salt-bag is thrown into the water of the ocean, says Kabir, all the salt in the bag is dissolved in the water, so that ultimately nothing remains inside the bag. Even so, when the human body, with all its emotions and passions, is thrown into the ocean of God, the emotions and passions are dissolved in God, and nothing but the body remains. Just, again, as no further salt can be produced inside the bag, similarly, no life-principle can reappear in the body. Reincarnation for man thus becomes impossible, just as reproduction of salt becomes impossible in the salt-bag.

(Page 398, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 608

It...becomes the duty of the Saint not to keep his spiritual accumulation only for himself, but to utilise it for the upliftment of humanity.

(Page 397, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 607

...our feelings and emotions must...be handed over to God. We must denude our minds of them, and make God reign in their place.

(Page 397, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 606

Kabir advises absolute impartiality to all and an even balance. Higher and lower classes, Congressmen and Socialists, democrats and communists, would have been all alike to him. He would have wished them all Good-Luck !

(Page 396, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 605

...mystical experience is not to be narrated to everybody. We should not open out our diamond before a vegetable-seller. Prudence thus becomes the chief mark for those who have walked on the path of God. ..A room may be full of diamonds, but the owner must not open it from time to time. It is only when a great jeweller comes, that the value of the jewels may come to light.

(Page 395-396, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 604

...those who say they know do not know; those who say they do not know may alone be credited with knowledge...the perfected Saint remains silent and merged in God; he remains absolutely mute and dumb, enjoying all the while the vision and the presence of God.

(Page 395, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 603

It is not merely by his own mystical achievement that a man may be useful to society, but by his consequent moral characteristics. In fact, he may have attained to the Godhead, but, for all practical purposes the world knows him by his moral marks.

(Page 393, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 602

...difference between the spider and the saint which we may conceive of is that while the spider ascends as well as descends by its thread, the saint can only go on continually ascending.

(Page 379, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 601

...unless we carry on an intimate meditation by kirtan, gayan and dhyana, we nay not be able to rise to the full heights of spiritual experience.

(Page 378, Chapter V, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)


Week 600

Kabir tells us humorously that when an aspirant is sitting up for meditation, his tongue is moving in his mouth, his hand is moving on the rosary, and his mind is moving in all the ten directions. This is only pseudo-meditation, says Kabir.

(Page 354, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 599

....meditate in silence. There is no use in calling upon the name of God aloud....He who hears the sound of an ant's feet, will He not know the quality of your heart ?

(Page 353, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 598

...the number of times we have uttered the Name of God has nothing to do with His realisation. What is wanted is only the quality and intensity of the heart.

(Page 353, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 597

It is not simply a mechanical uttering of the name of God that will lead one to illumination. There must be a Bhava accompanying the utterance of the name. So, insistence may be laid on the quality of the heart rather than on utterance by tongue.

(Page 349, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 596

The real Guru is he ... at whose instance his disciples have walked on the path of God, taking note of the landmarks and the sign-boards on the way until they have reached their final destination from which there is no return.

(Page 338-339, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 595

The Guru of the ordinary type is the Guru of the limited; his sole function is to breathe into the ears of his disciple his so-called Mantra. The function of the real spiritual teacher is not the breathing of this Mantra into the ears of his disciple, but the showing of the form of God to his vision. What is the use of imparting a Mantra to a disciple, if it does not result in the vision of the God-head ?

(Page 338, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 594

...in the midst of the calamities and misfortunes which might fall to the lot of his disciple, the spiritual teacher gives him internal and continuous support, and enables him to face boldly his trials and tribulations. Every misfortune, every calamity, has now a silver lining for him. The Sun of his Guru's grace shines through the edge of his misfortunes, though these for a while might darken the luminosity of his spiritual life.

(Page 337, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 593

...the disciple has, by a process of self-purification, to continue his effort to perfect himself on the path of realization.

(Page 336, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 592

The Guru separates Vyavahara from Paramartha, matter from spirit, just as the swan separates water from milk. This is the principal function which a Guru performs. Not every bird is capable of performing this miraculous function. In the same manner, not every so-called Guru can separate matter from spirit for the upliftment of his disciple.

(Page 335, Chapter IV, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 591

...to see the Saint is fully equivalent to seeing God...the formless not being satisfied with living in an isolated condition, came and took on the form of a Saint to confer the highest spiritual boons on humanity.

(Page 327-328, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 590

...many seekers want to have not simply either material welfare or spiritual welfare singly, but their combination. Greatness in the world may not be incompatible with greatness in the spiritual life.

(Page 325, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 589

Tulsidas tells us that God comes with greater force and love to the heart of a devotee who meditates merely on the Name of God without caring for the Form, a superb illustration of what may be called Nishkam Bhakti.

(Page 314, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 588

Let your hearts, wills, and minds be all pervaded by the presence of God. This is the supreme boon that the author of the Rigveda asks at the end of his great work.

(Page 306, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 587

...not knowing the presence of God inside, the whole of mankind wanders about to find Him in the outside world, and when their patience has been tried in finding God in the outside world, they return to themselves to find God at their very door, in fact, inside their own mind.

(Page 305, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 586

It is only when we pass through adversities that we are reminded of the presence of God, and then we know how we can surrender ourselves to him.

(Page 305, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 585

...the form of God remains latent and immanent in all human beings, as well as in all things of the world...the way in which red colour lies latent and hidden in the myrtle-leaves. Now, this colour cannot be brought out unless the leaves are pounded in a mortar, or with a stone. The implication is that the form of God will not appear to our vision, unless we pass through difficulties and perils. Perils or difficulties are the source of wisdom and realisation.

(Page 304, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 584

A Saint when born shines in his own native lustre even like a superb form of spiritual experience to which nothing else can be compared, and which stands supreme above all other forms.

(Page 303-04, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 583

A real Saint is a rare being. You can find him only on occasions.

(Page 303, Chapter III, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 582

You have to build and thatch the city of God-devotion, give shade and protection to all those who may come to stay in it, and live in it yourself along with your brother devotees.

(Page 294, Chapter II, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 581

...all human beings are the embodiments of God Himself.

(Page 294, Chapter II, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 580

When that ...Kali-purush (God of Death) will appear before you, you will have to consider whether your tender body will be able to bear the blow. "Beware, therefore, be times, begin to think about God even today."

(Page 275-76, Chapter I, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 579

The God of Death is always moving forward. He is pursuing humanity with his drum being constantly beaten. "Under these circumstances, " asks Rahim, "what solace can we have? Taking resort to the maxim that nothing abides in this world, and all things are always changing, our only approach to reality would be a contemplation on the nature of Flux or death."

(Page 272, Chapter I, Part II, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 578

"I am tired of teaching the world. People have remained listless and indifferent in spite of my repeated efforts to better them." - Ramdas

(Page 261, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 577

"Where shall I kindle my light, O God", asks Raidas: "That is filling thy servant with wonder":. Thou art present everywhere, where shall I then plant my lights before Thee? Secondly, is it not a parody to wave lights before Thee, O Resplendent God, when, through everyone of Thy hairs, dazzles the brilliance of a thousand Suns?

(Page 257, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 576

To mark the Punyatithi of Parampujya Nimbargi Maharaj on 5th April 2012, provided below is a song composed by him. (translated by Suresh Gajendragadkar, Sucharita Bhagwat)

Oh ! God free me from the dragging influence of the mind. When I proceed to do a noble deed, evil motives obstruct the path. I started for pilgrimage of Varanashi, but my mind was attracted by the tiny things on the outskirts and I forgot you. Mind does not get itself engrossed in Guru's feet but goes wandering in the forest. Kindly therefore, restrain my mind.

Week 575

Do not the iron filings catch up the power of the magnet ? Do not the planets derive their illumination from the Central Orb ? It is following some such line of argument that Kabir was able to say that on account of the presence and the power of God in him, he was able to save not merely himself, but also those who had been fortunate to come into spiritual communion with him.

(Page 264, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 574

Has not Carlyle told us to look to our own saving, and leave the saving of the world to its Maker ?

(Page 264, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 573

God in his graciousness gave me the mandate and the power to save some at least, and thus to bring light into the life of some. If you are not now saved, you have to blame yourself and not me.

(Page 262, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 572

I am astonished at people's indifference, in spite of my continued endeavours for their betterment - Kabir

(Page 261, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 571

The Saint is surrounded not merely by a number of devotees, but also by those who are indifferent to his activities. Our friend, the frog, cannot appreciate the pervading fragrance, even though he is in the midst of a hundred full-blown lotuses.

(Page 251, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 570

A famous saint of the South used to say that by kakada aarti, which is only another name of the Prabhati or Bhupali, we ought to understand that we have to drive away the kak or canker of sleep from our own eyes, and rouse ourselves to the consciousness of God instead of making any attempt to awaken God Himself.

(Page 248, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 569

What is the use of mere talking, what is the use of mere thinking ? We must live philosophy.

(Page 244, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 568

A man has to lead a pure and spiritual life, and this will result in improving the character and ideals of those who come into contact with him.

(Page 236, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 567

Without extreme toil and turmoil, no high achievements are possible.

(Page 234, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 566

...we have to note that this Divine Juice cannot be obtained, except at the price of desperate devotion to God. A great deal of torture and trouble must be experienced before one gets even a small quantity of this Divine Juice.

(Page 229, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 565

...both Kabir and Dadu tell us that as a result of this draught of Divine Juice, the seeker becomes fearless and immortal.

(Page 228, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 564

...it may be remembered that the Guru might give only the potentiality of the draught (of Divine Juice), instead of the draught itself. It depends upon the disciple to utilise the gift according to the best of his powers.

(Page 228, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 563

When Hate enters the sphere, he (Empedocles) says, Love is driven out, and when Love enters, Hate is driven away. Similarly, says Charandas, when sloth enters the mind, there is an end to all joy and when joy (spiritual joy produced by hearing the Anahata sound) enters, sloth and inaction are dispelled altogether.

(Page 218, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 562

...process of meditation...drive away all ideas that may saunter up in ...mind. Unless the mind is cleared of the weeds of ideas, the Name of God would not take root in it. The driving of ideas should properly be accomplished in the psycho-ethical manner...Thus, when the mind is caught up either in the name of God, or in the breath, or in the passage from 'muladhaar' to 'sahastraar', other ideas will cease, and the idea of God will be regnant in the mind of the aspirant, who will thus be enabled to reach the 'Unmani' state.

(Page 214, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 561

He (Charandas) says the true method of worship by which God can be propitiated is to bathe him with honour, to anoint him with love, to place flowers of sweet and humble words on his forehead, and to make him a continuous oblations of one's own self. Moral worship is what appeals to humanity, and they may join Charandas in regarding the virtuous and dedicated life as the only true mode of worshipping God.

(Page 210, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 560

...the immaculate Nama plays an important part in the experience of saints of all races and nationalities, whether Hindus, Muslims or Christians.

(Page 209, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 559

When we shut all the sense organs to outer perceptions, then probably by proper meditation on God, and by His Grace, internal senses open, and we are able to perceive, hear and speak things which it would be ordinarily impossible for human beings to do.

(Page 200, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 558

...we are told by Surdas about the worldly effects of God realisation. It does not behove God to keep His devotee in poverty and consequent humiliation. He thus enables His devotee in abject poverty to move on with a 'Royal Umbrella' unfurled over his head : What cannot the Grace of God do ?

(Page 200, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 557

...it may not be given to man to reach the very highest limit of all at once, and yet a man can always keep going nearer and nearer to the peak.

(Page 197, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 556

Mirabai tells us that spiritual life cannot be nurtured without the company of the spiritual teacher, and the saints. The spiritual teacher and the saints perform the functions respectively of the mother and the nurse, or to vary the metaphor, of the sower and the gardener. It is only in the company of the good that our virtuous life flowers, and when we come across those who have reached the highest state of realisation, it fructifies.

(Page 196, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 555

...our human life here below is a very short-dated one, and that, therefore, we must turn it to the best account possible...Every moment that is given to us in this life we must turn to the best spiritual account.

(Page 194, Chapter V, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 554

Kabir advises us not to miss the opportunity provided by this life. Let us remember, he says, that we may not be born upon the earth from time to time. An opportunity missed is an opportunity lost !

(Page 178, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 553

...great people , says Dadu, are humble workers. It is a very important conception. The greater you are, the more humble you are.

(Page 167, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 552

Nanak tells us that it is only when we contemplate on God that we enter the region of the fearless.

(Page 161, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 551

Let the golden thread of thought pass through the jewels of actions and produce a beautiful necklace. Do good things, and think of good things, and adorn the neck of Rama by this beautiful necklace.

(Page 153, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 550

"In the case of myself and in the case of people like myself" says Tulsidas, "the tongue has only brought shame to the temple of the mouth." "That mouth in which God should have taken his seat, my tongue has defiled and has brought shame upon it." In that, it has an accomplice, namely the ears. It is engaged in 'parapavaad', 'paraninda' and 'kamakatha' and has a peculiar taste for fruitless discussion ('vadvivad swad'). The ears are helping it by a contemplation of sexual and erotic matters, which serve as the moonlight for the blossoming of "dispute". So what is the way out ? Tulsidas says "Engage thyself in the utterance of God's Name, so that thou might take away the sins of the ears".

(Page 150, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 549

To meditate on God conceiving His Form in our mind is Sakama and to meditate on God without conceiving His Form is Nishkama. God comes with greater love, says Tulsidas, to the man who meditates on His Name without thinking about His Form.

(Page 147, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 548

...according to the law of Spiritual Gravitation, the experience of a worthy spiritual teacher must automatically descend to his disciples. As water at a higher level must descend to a lower level, so the experience of a spiritual teacher must descend automatically to those who are walking on the path which he has trodden.

(Page 142, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 547

Who can direct the ship of a man's life, asks Kabir, except a spiritual guide, who knows the danger spots and situations, and possesses the power to carry the ship successfully to the other shore of existence ?

(Page 137, Chapter IV, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 546

...without rendering the highest reverential service to our Teacher, the double lock of God-love and God-vision would not open out to us.

(Page 96, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 545

If God is in all men, God-love must manifest itself through sympathy (daya) to all human beings.

(Page 96, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 544

Aristotle's ...dictum that character is habit, thereby giving a practical turn to our cultivation of moral virtues.

(Page 91, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 543

...according to Tulsidas, 'Ram Bharos' is the apex of all virtues.

(Page 87, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 542

According to Tulsidas, ...a complete belief in the beneficence and the power of God, constitutes the highest kind of Bhakti.

(Page 86, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 538 to Week 541

...as a consequence of ... surrender, it becomes the task of God to save his Bhakta from dangerous situations...

(Page 80, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

...a real Jnani is one whose knowledge is not inconsistent with his devotion...The Bhakti, by which he did ascend to the topmost rung of the ladder of Jnana or Illumination, could not be kicked away as soon as he has reached the highest rung. Illumination has sprung from and has grown out of a devoted search after God, and as soon as the basis is taken away, the topmost rung will crumble to the dust.

(Page 81, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

...virtues cannot be achieved in a single day...We must continuously practice ... virtues until they become perfect in us.

(Page 84, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

In order that God-devotion might develop in us, we must sing his praise, think of his qualities, narrate his exploits and contemplate on the spiritual words which he might have left for us.

(Page 85-86, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 537

A Bhakta is one, he (Tulsidas) says, who renounces his faith in everything else and places it only in me. The one mark of distinction between the Jnani and the Bhakta is that while the Jnani believes in his own powers, the Bhakta believes in mine, and surrenders himself entirely to me.

(Page 80, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 536

Jnana mean knowledge no doubt, but what knowledge ? This knowledge is really nothing but the intuitive realisation of God.

(Page 76, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 535

God-devotion is the highest virtue of which man is capable... the whole catalogue of virtues ...are merely ... aspects of this supreme virtue of God-devotion, and vices merely derelictions of ... that great central virtue.

(Page 70, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 534

The distinction between Jnana and Bhakti according to Tulsidas thus comes to be the distinction between a dazzling light and a brilliant jewel, the first of which kills the insects of passion that come to attack it, and the second dispels them away without killing them. We may say in passing that Jnana could not be credited with the virtue of Ahimsa while Ahimsa becomes the soul of Bhakti.

(Page 69, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 533

...we are told by Tulsidas that the worship of the Spiritual Master is the impenetrable armour of the warrior which no arrows can pierce, and which might therefore be called the unimitable equipment in his victorious journey through life.

(Page 68, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 532

Tulsidas tells us that if anybody stands in the way of our God-devotion, we should brush him aside.

(Page 64, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 531

God-devotion, according to Tulsidas, is the bond of substantiality between any two relatives or friends...the spokes of a wheel are connected with each other not directy, but only through the central hub which is God.

(Page 63, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 530

...Nanak tells us the extreme value of the company of the good...there is no enemy and no friend to such a man, no national no foreigner. He belongs to the city of the world, and , for the matter of that, the city of the spiritual world.

(Page 57, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 529

...a good man should act as he speaks...Action is the cradle of God. The saints act as they speak, and it is for this reason that they attain to divinity.

(Page 52, Chapter II, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 528

...resignation or submission to the will of God would be a more potent instrument of achieving the end than either belief in an unseen power or a philosophic reconciliation with a world-order. Who, ever, in the course of history has emerged successful except through an alliance with God ?

(Page 41, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 527

...only when we keep the fact of death every moment before us we may be encouraged to devote continuous attention to the spiritual life.

(Page 26, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 526

Why dost thou forget, that thou hast to mingle with dust some day ? Dust thou art, and to dust thou shalt have to return....So long as there are the wick and the oil in the lamp, the lamp glitters with brilliant luminosity; but as soon as the wick or the oil is finished, people will say 'take it away, take it away; we have no use of it any longer.

(Page 25-26, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 525

As dark spots must remain the constant possession of the Moon, so 'I and mine' have remained my constant possessions. Therefore I surrender myself to Thee, O Lord, in the hope that that alone might enable me to extricate myself from thraldom to sense.

(Page 25, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 524

Surdas tells us in a pitiful mood : "I have seen, I have heard, I have known, and yet I have not been able to extricate myelf from evil". The noteworthy feature about this attitude is that Surdas does not shake off his responsibility. Similar is the case with Virgil. He says, "I see the better but follow the worse" :"Video meliora proboque, deteriora sequor." It is really a great attitude. A question, which incidentally arises in this connection is the relation of self-effort to the grace of God. Surdas knows that he is lacking in sufficient power of effort, and therefore he asks for the grace of God which alone can fill the deficiencies of self-effort.

(Page 19, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 523

Krishnanand tells us that our proper business here below is to go back to our Maker in the same pure condition in which we came.

(Page 10, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 522

"Like a monkey" again, says Surdas, "I danced in every quadrivial for a few grains of corn at the behest of my master-juggler, showing my covetousness and greed for the most trivial things in life"....The way of escape......the pursuit of God alone will enable us to transcend the evils implied...

(Page 5 and 41, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 521

"I was inextricably caught up," he (Surdas) says..."like a fly in the honey of insatiable sensual desires". With all its effort, the fly cannot get out of the honey, when it is once caught in the sticky juice.......The way of escape......the pursuit of God alone will enable us to transcend the evils implied...

(Page 4,5 and 41, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 520

It is time for you to think, therefore, O foolish man, and to seek the company of the Saints, for it is only in their company that you will get something which will be worth your while. It is from them that you might learn to turn your own body and mind to their proper spiritual use.

(Page 28-29, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 519

...unless he resigns himself completely to the will of this Omnipotent Being, it may not be possible for him to pursue the spiritual path steadfastly, courageously and successfully.

(Page 4, Chapter I, Part I, PATHWAY to GOD in Hindi Literature, R D Ranade)

Week 518

...the teaching of both Jesus and Ramadasa seems to be absolutely alike...in as much as both of them practised the virtues which they preached, and preached them only after they had practised them.

(Page 424, Chapter XX, Mysticism in Maharashtra, R D Ranade)

Week 517

One should always merge oneself in the narration of God's exploits, so that people may always be attracted towards Him.

(Page 419, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 516

Wherever the Active Saint goes, he is liked by all......Wherever the wise man is, no quarrel can arise. He does not say one thing to a man's face, and another behind him. All people are ever anxious to meet him. He never troubles the hearts of people......He always engages himself in conferring obligations on others. He is pained by other people's sufferings, and becomes happy in their happiness. He desires that all people should be happy. As a pater-familias cares for all the members of his family, similarly the Sage cares for all......

(Page 418, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 515

......If by his activity he only brings grief to other people, he should not engage himself in that activity at all......

(Page 418, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 514

......we should act exactly as we speak, for it is only then that our words would have any value......

(Page 415, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 513

We should never injure the hearts of others......

(Page 415, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 512

If we pursue fame, we cannot get happiness; and if we pursue happiness, we cannot get fame.

(Page 415, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 511

...God, who is hidden to the sight of ordinary men, can be attained only in the company of the Good. When a man is allowed to come in the presence of a King, he becomes a rich man; similarly, when we enter the company of the Good, we immediately attain to God.

(Page 410, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 510

God has ever been a protective adamant to those who have submitted themselves to His will.

(Page 406, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 509

The Friend of God binds his love with God's love, and behaves only in a manner which would be approved of by God. In that way, indeed, the friendship between him and God grows.

(Page 405, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 508

If a man does nothing but only utter the Name of God, God is satisfied and protects His devotee.

(Page 400, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 507

The driving power...for spiritual life is given by meditation on God. All Saints, both Indian and Christian, have laid stress upon the efficacy of the Name in fulfilling the ambitions of the spiritual aspirant.

(Page 399, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 506

It is indeed the qualities of a disciple that ultimately bring liberation to him from the turmoil of the worldly life into a vision of the Spirit....To add to his intellect, he must have an unmitigated faith in his master, and must have renounced all bodily egoism.

(Page 398, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 505

...we should lead a life of meritorious deeds, and devote ourselves to the worship of God. We should not forsake the right to follow the path of what is not right.

(Page 397, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 504

God does not live in the heaven or in the heart of the Yogins, but only where the devotees sing His praise.

(Page 396, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 503

The Saints have in them the power of giving what nobody else can give. The esoteric knowledge of the Godhead, which is impossible to be attained by men, becomes possible only by contact with Saints. Nothing really stands between us and God, and yet we are not able to see Him, because our sight is not properly directed towards Him. Those who have sought to understand the nature of God have failed. Those who have prided themselves on their power of observation are deceived in the case of God-vision. God, indeed, cannot be shown by a lamp, nor can he be found out by means of light. For God's vision, there is no collyrium that can be applied to the eye to make Him visible. Nor can God be revealed in the searchlight of the Sun, or in the pleasing light of the Moon....Such a God can yet be shown by the Saint to the Seeker.

(Page 395, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 502

The justification for this exhortation to the pursuit of God consists in the teaching about the possibility of His realisation even during this life.

(Page 390, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 501

...even though one may die, one should live in the form of fame....

(Page 389, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)


Week 500

When thou hast attained to Self-knowledge, then will complete dispassion fill thy mind. Do not vainly delude thyself by saying that thou art liberated, and give loose reins to thy senses. In that way thy spiritual thirst shall never be quenched......I tell thee, finally, says Ramadasa, that whatever thou searchest that thou shall be.

(Page 379, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 499

It is good to give advice to others that they should meditate on the supreme sentence, " That art thou " ; but this does not mean that they should take a rosary in their hands, and count the sentence in their minds. What is wanted is meditation on the substance of that great Sentence.

(Page 377, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Chapter XIX, The Dasabodha - R D Ranade)

Week 498

...moral characteristics of the God-realizer...He is firmly fixed in the form of God internally, but behaves like an ordinary man externally.

(Page 122, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 497

As a matter of fact, God so fills every nook and cranny of the world that every object must succumb before His infinite omnipotence.

(Page 64, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 496

It is only him who submits unconditionally to Me that I relieve from the bonds of birth and death. I am the sole refuge of the supplicants.

(Page 63, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 495

When the Guru has accepted the disciple, the whole Samsara becomes full of joy......

(Page 51, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 494

If a small brook carries water to a river, does the river throw it out, simply because it comes from a brook? It is thus that I approach thee with words of praise, says Jnanesvara to Nivrittanatha, and if they are inadequate, it behoves thee only to forgive their puerile simplicity.

(Page 50-51, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 493

...like a true mother...the grace of the Guru waves lights of spiritual illumination before the aspirant, and puts on him the ornaments of spiritual gold.

(Page 49, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 492

How is it possible...when the grace of the Guru comes down in floods, that the scorching heat of Samsara may continue to burn one with grief?

(Page 49, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 491

Jnanesvara tells us that he cannot adequately praise the greatness of the Guru. Is it possible, he asks, to add lustre to the sun ? Is it possible to crown the Kalpataru with flowers ? Is it possible to add a scent to camphor ? How can the sandal tree be made more fragrant ? How can nectar be re-dressed for meals ? ..........How can one add a hue to the pearl ? Or what is the propriety of giving a silver polish to gold ? It is better that one should remain silent, and silently bow to the feet of his master.

(Page 49, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 490

...where there is the grace of the Guru, what cannot be obtained, asks Jnaneswara?

(Page 49, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 489

Jnanesvara is so much possessed by devotion to his Guru that he cannot but give vent to his feelings for his master from time to time...he speaks of his master as having enabled him to cross the ocean of existence; as when proper collyrium is administered to one's eyes, they are able to see anything whatsoever, and forthwith any hidden treasure; as when the wish-jewel has come to hand, our desires are all fulfilled; similarly and through Nivrittinatha, says Jnanesvara, all his desires have been fulfilled.

(Page 48, Mysticism In Maharashtra, Chapter III, The Jnanesvari - R D Ranade)

Week 488

Unless all our sins are burned away the path of God will not open out to us and unless we are successful in reaching the God-head, we shall not become sinless.

(Page 236,237 , The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 487

Show me a man, says a passage from a sacred book, who has never looked at another man's woman with an eye of lust. It does not matter if you sin, but repent you must.

(Page 209 , The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 486

Any good act that is performed reacts upon itself and all the bad effects of a man's actions or even bad thoughts are washed off and purity is produced.

(Page 178, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 485

Characteristics of an Equanimous Man (Stithaprajna) - 4 of 4

Finally we come to the mystical characterisation....such a man is always in an equanimous state of mind. He lives in Saamyavastha; therefore he is God.

(Page 196, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 484

Characteristics of an Equanimous Man (Stithaprajna) - 3 of 4

Social. As regards the social characteristic of the Stithaprajna...For such a man there is equality of vision everywhere. Whether it is a cow or a bullock, a bird or a buffalo, a dog or a dog-eater, a Candala or a Brahmin, there is the same vision for him in all cases. This is what we might call the social characteristic of the Stithaprajna.

(Page 196, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 483

Characteristics of an Equanimous Man (Stithaprajna) - 2 of 4

Moral. The ocean is full. Hundreds of rivers flow into it, but the ocean is not increased by the inflow of these waters. If it increases, it is due to the influence of the Moon, but not to the inflow of the waters of the rivers. As the inflow of the waters of the rivers has no influence on the sea, similarly the senses have no influence over a poised mind. This is the moral characteristic of a Stithaprajna. But there is another aspect of this moral characterisation which we might consider. It is what may be called the moral Jivan-mukti as distinguished from the metaphysical Jivan-mukti. He who is able to bear the ferocious onslaught of Kama and Krodha before he bids good-bye to his body may be called a moral Jivan-mukta.

(Page 195-196, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 482

Characteristics of an Equanimous Man (Stithaprajna) - 1 of 4

Psychological. The psychological characteristic consists in withdrawing the mind from the organs of sense. Let not our mind be subjected to the influence of the sense organs. Man's mind is tossed to and fro on the sea of sensual enjoyment like a boat, helpless and hapless. One who is able to conquer his senses is compared to a kurma or a tortoise which can withdraw its organs within itself at will. Such is the pyschological characterisation of a Stithaprajna.

(Page 194-195, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 481

Paricharyaa. ...inspite of such lordliness he does not find it difficult to do service to humanity. In fact, service to humanity (paricharyaa), even though it might seem antithetical to lordiness, is the result of it.

(Page 190, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 480

Ishwarbhav. This brings in its train a state of absolute lordliness in a God-realiser. He does find himself to be the lord of all he surveys. This is what is meant by Ishwarbhav, the lordliness of the realised saint. He is like a pinnacle. He stands alone to himself in his solitary greatness and with the power to do good whenever and wherever he likes.

(Page 190, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 479

A man who has reached God must show courage and valour in thought and action.

(Page 190, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 478

...cardinal criterion of God-realisation, namely, Santi or peace. As we have seen elsewhere, Santi or peace and the bliss of God are interdependent and the two are perfected together. But the peace which follows upon the enjoyment of divine bliss is higher than the peace which precedes it.

(Page 190, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 477

God-realisation also implies a complete sacrifice of all our possessions for the sake of God. This is really what is meant by Yajna . The sacrifice of all objects to God brings in its train the sacrifice involved in our dispassionately doing good to all fellow beings.

(Page 189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 476

When we have reached a high stage of God-realisation, fearlessness follows on the heels of our experience...This is the reason why a saint is absolutely fearless.

(Page 189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 475

...we must follow the principle of non-attachment to all external and internal objects. Aasakti to God means asakti to all other things whatsoever. Otherwise, we would be reduced to the plight of Jadabharat in the Bhagwata.

(Page 189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 474

We cannot hope to reach God unless we have completely controlled our senses. The senses must not compel us to follow the innumerable objects of desire, if we want to achieve the supreme object of desire, namely, God.

(Page 189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 473

The ...principle of treating equally all created beings results in the virtue of Ahimsa which regards all life as inviolable. Hence arises the virtue of harmlessness or non-violence.

(Page 189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 472

One of the evident effects of ...God-devotion would be the absolute purification of our mind. No bad idea dare enter our soul if it is once filled with God. Ours is a jealous God and He would not allow any pretender to the throne.

(Page 189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 471

...duty is to be performed leaving away all attachment and desire for the fruit. This rule is applicable, according to the Bhagadvadgita, not merely to ordinary actions but even to holy actions. We are to do our duty skillfully and in a spirit of equanimity...whenever we are doing our actions in a spirit of sacrifice we are freed from their contamination.

(Page 177,178, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 470

...the wheel of the Universe which is perpetually and unceasingly rotating and of which we form a part. If we want to be conscious of it we must become a worthy part of it.

(Page 174, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 469

...Aurobindo emphasizes that our highest ideal ought to be to surrender ourselves to the Master of Existence which, according to him, consitutes the great finale of human achievement.

(Page 154, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 468

It is not simply by performing our devotional acts that we may be able to achieve our highest goal. God must be moved and it is only when He is moved that He will move the world by His Grace. There are three points in this element of Grace as we may be able to see from the Bhagavadgita...the Grace of God descends upon the aspirant who is nearing his perfection in three stages. In the first place, God gives a particular bent to his intellect and volition, a stimulus and a direction in which he might work. That is Budhhiyoga. Secondly, after he has worked unceasingly in this direction for a long time, he becomes the recipient of God's Anukampa or compassion. And finally, God crowns his efforts with the gift of His blessing. God actually delivers His goods. It is only when the aspirant has passed through all these three stages, namely, Buddhiyoga, Anukampa and Prasad, that we might say that the Grace of God has fully descended on him.

(Page 226-227, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 467

...the Bhagavadgita tells us that it is only through one-pointed devotion to God that one may be able to know Him, see Him and enter into Him.

(Page 226, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 466

...in the first place, we should be inspired with one-pointed devotion towards God. We should have no other object of attachment. Then secondly, we are told that we must practice meditation without sacrificing a single moment and finally we are told that this must be continued from day to day, month to month and year to year to the very end of our life....When all these things have been accomplished, then alone does the success in spiritual life become assured. We must not, however, forget to note that Bhava or Bhakti, an unexplained and inexplicable love of God, is a fundamental requirement; meditation from hour to hour and day to day and even concentration on the name of God are of secondary importance.

(Page 225-226, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 465

...Kama is the chiefest enemy which must be first conquered. What in modern psycho-analysis is regarded as a powerful element in human nature must be conquered, if moral and spiritual progress is to be made. Even to talk about lust, as the psycho-analysts do freely, would itself be an act of lust. The Bhagavadgita has no difficulty in saying that as a mirror may be covered by dust, as fire may be covered by smoke or as a foetus might be covered by amniotic membrane, even so our spiritual life may be covered by lust. We have to drive it away; then alone would the Atman be born.

(Page 224, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 464

...a man must be a one-pointed Bhakta if he wants to receive drops of mercy from God. ...fine verses from Tulsidasa in which we are given the instance of a Cataka. It was pelted by Nature with pebbles of ice with the consequence that its feathers were reduced to pieces. In addition, a huntsman came and discharged a mortal arrow at the bird. Then what did it do? It fell into the Ganga, no doubt, but it did not turn its beak downwards. It refused to partake of the holy waters of the Ganga. It lifted its beak upwards towards the cloud in order that it might gather some drops of rain from it. This is an illustration to show how a man must be a one-pointed Bhakta if he wants to receive drops of mercy from God. The goal of the attention of the Cataka was the drops of water from the cloud. The goal of the attention of a Bhakta should be drops of mercy from God.

(Page 254-255, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 463

Is God to be regarded as Actor or Spectator? ...Goethe ...describes God as whirling the world round about His finger in a circle...Action here is attributed to God...The Prakriti gives birth, no doubt, to all animate and inanimate existences, but it does so on account of the fact that God is its supervisor or Adhyaksa and is responsible for its 'Sfuran'. It is on account of the force of the magnet that motion is imparted to the iron filings. It is in this way that Prakriti is disturbed from its original equilibrium or passivity. It is on account of the combination of this passivity of the Prakriti and the activity of God that we can speak of Emanationism as a reconciliation of the two conflicting ideas of activity and passivity.

(Page 162-163, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 462

Unless we repent, God's name shall not come to our lips. Repentance is the cause of ecstasy. If one sincerely repents, God is not far from him.

(Chapter XI, Page 220, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 461

......Whatever desire there may be in man, except the one for God, will only contribute to his ultimate ruin. When the body falls off, the considerations of power will also cease, while God will have ever kept Himself away from the aspiring soul. (Dasabodha V.2.33-43)

(Chapter XIX, Page 397, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 460

Ramadasa also......points out the great spiritual value of the body while it is yet living......The real end of bodily existence should be God-vision......Animals cannot have this open way to God; in the human body alone is one able to attain to God. It is only by taking a human body that men have become saints and sages and devotees......Hence, if the body is strong and without any disease or defect, it should be forthwith utilised in the service of God. (Dasabodha I. 10.1-32)

(Chapter XIX, Page 388, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 459

In the same strain, Ramadasa tells us elsewhere that in this mortal fair the only profit what we should seek is God. "Mortal things remain in this world and nobody can take them away for a future existence. Hence we should grow indifferent to all things, and give ourselves up to contemplation, by which the infinite profit of God will be attained. There is no greater profit than the vision of god, and one can attain to it even while carrying on the ordinary duties of life. Many meritorious men like King Janaka have lived and ruled erewhile. Similarly are there many meritorious men today. But death care not for the King, and will not leave him even if he offers lakhs and crores of rupees. Life indeed is a dependent variable, and we have to suffer all kinds of pain and anxieties while living. In this mortal fair, the only profit is God, who alone compensates for all its sufferings." (Dasabodha XII. 8. 28-34)

(Chapter XIX, Page 387-388, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 458

Practical way, according to Ramadasa, for the realisation of ...God...

Ramadasa begins by exhorting us to the spiritual life by calling our attention to the evanescence of all existence. "We do not know what accidents may befall us......If thou wert to die at this moment, thou shalt fall off from God as thou art centred in egoism......Thou followest after mean people for filling thy belly, and thou flatterest them and praisest them. Thou sellest thy body to him who gives food to thee. But thou forgettest God who has given thee birth......Sinful and mean are those who follow sensual enjoyment, leaving God......He who wishes to have eternal happiness should follow God, leaving away the company of men, which is the cause of sorrow." (Dasabodha III. 10.39-63).

(Chapter XIX, Page 387, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 457

Call the highest principle the Atman or Brahman as you please, the real business of the spiritual aspirant is to apprehend that principle in actual experience. It is quality- less, and yet it fills every nook and cranny of the universe. It is a principle which remains eternal in the midst of change and destruction......It is a principle which is beyond all imagination, and which is untouched by any illusion whatsoever. What comes to be and what passes out of existence must never be confounded with what can never become or pass away......It is indeed a principle which is open to spiritual insight, and one who attains it should remain alone to himself, and thus assimilate himself to the Divine. It is beyond what the eye sees and what the mind imagines. It is both beyond the physical and the mental. That principle is both inside and outside. It is infinite. It is distant and near......As to our knowledge of this principle, we should depend upon our own spiritual experience. We must not be under compunction of another man's opinion because another man's opinion is incompetent to lead us to God.

(Chapter XIX, Page 386, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 456

Life indeed is transient, and you must not allow it to waste.

(Chapter V, Page 176, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 455

...as the trees in a forest become fragrant by a sandal tree, which is in the midst of them, similarly, people begin to love God when there is a devotee in the midst of them.

(Chapter V, Page 176, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 454

The only sacred thing in this world is God, and the most non-sacred thing is the mind of the unbeliever.

(Chapter V, Page 176, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 453

The Saints indeed take on a body when the path of religion vanishes, and when irreligion reigns.

(Chapter XI, Page 225, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 452

It is a matter of shame to God that His devotee should look piteous in the eyes of men. God regards His life as useless, if the words of the devotee come untrue.

(Chapter XI, Page 225, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 451

If we place our burden on God, God shall certainly support us in the midst of difficulties. He serves His devotees, as Krishna served Arjuna by being his charioteer.

(Chapter XI, Page 224, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 450

The Saints are really more generous than even a cloud. They fulfil all desires. They turn away the minds of men from empty and insignificant things, and make them worthy of themselves.

(Chapter XI, Page 224, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 449

Ekanatha thinks that it is an extremely lucky event to meet with real saints. One may be able to know the past, the present and the future; one may be able to stop the Sun from setting; one may easily cross the ocean; but it is difficult to meet a real Saint.

(Chapter XI, Page 223-224, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 448

The efficacy of the Guru consists in the revelation to the disciple of the true way to God.

(Chapter XIX, Page 390, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 447

We should never trust people when they say that God will be realised some day during the long evolution of our lives. God must be seen forthwith, and even while the body lasts.

(Chapter XIX, Page 390, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 446

"Leave away everything and follow Him. Then only will you come to realise the secret of life. God has created all happiness, but people forget Him, and hunt after the happiness He has created. God himself has said in the Bhagavadgita : 'Leave away everything and follow Me'; but people turn a deaf ear to what He has said. Hence it is that suffer all kinds of grief.

(Chapter XIX, Page 390, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 445

Call the highest principle the Atman or Brahman as you please, the real business of the spiritual aspirant is to apprehend that principle in actual experience.

(Chapter XIX, Page 386, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 444

......People have vainly looked after the externals and have missed the God who is immanent in them. Indeed by incalculable merit alone can a man know the movements of this God. By meditating on Him, all sin would be at an end. They who have looked inside, have been saved. They who have looked outside, have all gone to perdition (Dasabodha XVIII.1.16-24)

(Chapter XIX, Page 382, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 443

What is the use of mere wandering at random...keep the company with the good; for; in the company of the good, has God been attained by many men (Dasabodha XVIII.8.1-13)

(Chapter XIX, Page 382, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 442

Of all kinds of Bhakti, Atmanivedana or Self-surrender is the best

(Chapter XIX, Page 278, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 441 (on the occasion of Krishna Jayanti)

Where there is happiness, there is energy, Where there is the Sun, there is light......Where Lord Krishna is, there is Lakshmi; and where both of them are, there are all the maidens of Lakshmi, namely, the Powers. Krishna is victory himself, and with the party with which He has sided, victory must ultimately lie. (Epilogue of the Jnaneswari)

(Chapter III, Page 138, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 440

Various Sciences have tried to take the measure of God, says Ekanatha, and yet God has remained immeasurable.

(Chapter XI, Page 227, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 439

Ekanatha tells us that real Sandhya consists merely in making obeisance to all beings with the feeling of non-difference.

(Chapter XI, Page 226, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 438

There is no saviour except Saints when a calamity befalls man; for the gods become weary of the evil- doers, but the Saints accept them also.

(Chapter XI, Page 224, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 437

Bhakti is the root, of which dispassion is the flower, and illumination the fruit.

(Chapter XI, Page 223, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 436

The Name of God gives us divine happiness. It puts an end to all diseases of body and mind. It helps us to preserve equanimity

(Chapter XI, Page 222, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 435

Seeking of wealth is one sure road to ruin. If we were to add to it the seeking of women, we do not know what may come to pass

(Chapter XI, Page 221, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 434

...disbelief is the cause of many vices. It produces egoism, and destroys the spiritual life. One may say that disbelief is the crown of all sins

(Chapter XI, Page 220, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 433

...God Himself serves him who regards his spiritual teacher as identical with God.

(Chapter XI, Page 220 Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 432

Bhanudasa, the great-grandfather of Ekanatha tells us that he knows of no other code of conduct and no other mode of thought than that of uttering the Name of God.

(Chapter XI, Page 218 Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 431

...one's own appointed work, done in the spirit of dedication, leads to heaven.

(Chapter XX Page 314, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 430

Just as a young one of the eagle is safe under the protective wings of the mother-eagle, so also I am secure under the protection afforded by my Guru's teaching. When this infinite support and protection of the Guru is there, my desire for going after different dieties has ceased, says Purandaradasa.

(Chapter XX Page 311, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 429

How very easy it is to find access to this God ! What is wanted is only a sincere uprising of devotion in the heart.

(Chapter XVII Page 264, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 428

'the body leaves you at the appointed time without hesitation.' Therefore it is necessary to know God immediately. Gangadhara urges us to concentrate our attention on the form of God at once without losing a moment.

(Chapter XVI, Page 245, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 427

Further we are told by Mahipati that no man can hope to attain this vastu unless he has got real bhava or devotion. Mere counting of beads or observation of fasts on Ekadasi, eleventh day of a month would be of no use. Of course it will make your mind pure; but it will not lead you to God-realisation. What is wanted is devotion and not mere counting of beads and 'its nature can be understood only by those who have got Bhava,'.

(Chapter XVI, Page 242, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 426

...it is only in the gradual process of the vision of God that we will become more and more sinless. So sinlessness and vision of God are mutually dependent. The two proceed pari passu. Is sinlessness first or the vision of God first? There is a sort of antinomy here. It could be resolved only by their mutual dependence. As you become more and more sinless you get more and more of the vision of God. Sinlessness and vision of God cannot be absolutely cut asunder from one another.

(Chapter XV, Page 235, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 425

...think about God, utter his name, and ultimately...get...released from the miseries of life and ... liberated.

(Chapter XV, Page 225, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 424

Not a single Svasa or breath should go in vain, not a single second, not a single minute without God's remembrance.

(Chapter XV, Page 225, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 423

We are to make our best moral efforts, knowing that mere words will not enable us to reach Reality. When we have exercised our body and mind and have led the life of a saint or a sage and when we have entirely devoted ourselves to God and sacrificed ourselves for Him, then it is possible for us to know something about God. That is the moral criterion according to Mahipati.

(Chapter XV, Page 222, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 422

It is on account of your moral and religious effort that you can attain to Reality. He also tells us like Nijagunasivayogi, that mere words are unable to give us an idea of the Reality, ... 'it cannot be described words, though seen with the eye (of intuition)'. Of course, you can realise some forms of God but you cannot express them by words of mouth. Expression presumes a duality. Experience presupposes a unity. So experience cannot be attained by expression nor can this experience be expressed. That is what Mahipati says.

(Chapter XV, Page 221-222, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 421

...morality...placed even above religion. Intelligence ...really cannot lead us directly to God; so you must exercise your intelligence to some extent, knowing full well that it will not lead you ultimately to the final goal. Devotion is of course necessary. Without that you cannot move forward even a single step...those who have devotion know the secret. It is only the devoted that can attain to the nature of Reality...it is only to him who lives the life of a sage or a saint that it becomes available...it is attained by those who have merit. It is on account of your moral and religious effort that you can attain to Reality.

(Chapter XV, Page 221, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 420

...Mahipati tells us that intelligence, devotion and morality are all required for the realisation of God, but particularly morality.

(Chapter XV, Page 221, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 419

...one who repeats the name of God incessantly, has no fear of death. It is the purifier of the most sinful; it yields the fruit which is equal to the performance of crores of sacrifices and is the only means of securing the highest spiritual experience in life. All the eminent devotees of ancient times stand testimony to this fact.

(Chapter XIII, Page 191-192, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 418

We must take resort to the power of God and know that He does everything for our ultimate good.

(Chapter XIII, Page 189, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 417

When God's name is there, says Purandaradasa to fulfil all the desires of a sincere devotee, where is the necessity of performing sacrifices and rituals, counting beads and doing hard penances? Remember, therefore, Oh man, the name of God with concentrated devotion.

(Chapter XIII, Page 188, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 416

Unless we become sinless we cannot attain to the form of God and unless we attain to the form of God we cannot become sinless. So these things are interdependent. and the path of the seeker just lies on the razor's edge. So sinlessness is the first price that we have got to pay.

(Chapter XIII, Page 189, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 415

God appears to those who surrender themselves to Him.

(Chapter XI, Page 164, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 414

I have been greatly overwhelmed by the grief in the world; I have trodden the wrong path. I have taken to the company of the wicked. Nobody has pointed out to me the way to get out of this difficulty. Kindly therefore, Oh God, point out to me the way to get out of this grief. Ultimately what is impossible for you, O Krisna! You have been a miracle-performer. I might not have come up to the level which you expect of me. But my heart is yours. So have compassion on me and relieve me from this bondage of life.

(Chapter X, Page 146-147, Pathway to God in Kannada literature)

Week 413

...the retinue of the king comes to your help in times of difficulty or it showers praise upon you...when God is pleased. But what will happen when He is displeased? As when an earthen pot full of water is broken to pieces by coming in contact with a stone and the water runs out in a moment, similarly all your aspirations and desires will come to naught if God just becomes displeased with you. God is thus omnipotent.

(Chapter X, Page 144, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 412

God knows everything, no question about that. God is omniscient; but the devotee knows God and therefore, knows the omniscient and therefore, he is more than the omniscient. That is what Basavesvara himself tells us.

(Chapter X, Page 143, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 411

God is both immanent and transcendent, both inside and outside. So when we contemplate upon God in this manner all our sorrows and fears must come to an end.

(Chapter IX, Page 133, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 410

...we must maintain what the Stoics and Epicureans call epoche, the discipline which Mahatma Gandhi observed so often in his life, namely, Mauna. When we do not talk too much or do not talk at all then it is possible for us to fix our mind upon something which is beyond us. So we must not talk too much.

(Chapter VIII, Page 107, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 409

I have been telling you that the saint of Nimbargi was one of the greatest saints of modern times....He exhorts us to hum like a bee on the lotus-feet of our master. What the bee does is to hum round the lotus with a view to finding out and gathering honey. So it is the business of the disciple to hum round the lotus feet of his master and suck as much honey as he can.

(Chapter VIII, Page 106, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 408

...those who want to imbibe the characteristics of an ideal disciple should as far as possible try to imitate these qualities. The disciple is described as born upon earth like Faith incarnate and resplendent Penance; that is the first characteristic. The second is that he is absolutely oblivious and unmindful of his own greatness. It is the duty of such an ideal disciple to sing the glory of his master. He has no other vocation. He might be great in a way; but then he must be wholly forgetful of it. Thirdly, he must become a flute in the hands of his master and act reflexly or automatically and do whatever the teacher directs him to do. Fourthly, he milks the Kamadhenu, the wish- fulfilling cow, and distributes the milk to the society and to the world. Finally, this disciple is more than camphor. We very often burn camphor before God. It is a very pure substance. And this disciple is purer than camphor. What does this camphor do? The piece of camphor burns, shines before the deity, shines to His glory, but ultimately it disappears. Thus a vacuum or non-existence is created; but this ideal disciple is more than camphor, because he is immortal, he lives and makes his teacher live. So while the ordinary camphor exhausts itself, the real spiritual disciple never does. He immortalises both himself and his teacher.

(Chapter VII, Page 100-101, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 407

(Prayer to the Saint of Nimbargi 5 of 5)

Let all my life...be devoted to thy service, Oh, my spiritual teacher.

(Chapter VII, Page 96, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 406

(Prayer to the Saint of Nimbargi 4 of 5)

Let my thoughts and deeds and words shine under the canopy of thy illumination. Let thy light spread all round and let my thoughts and words and deeds shine under that canopy so that they will attain to health and vigour.

(Chapter VII, Page 96, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 405

(Prayer to the Saint of Nimbargi 3 of 5)

...let your mercy and compassion constitute my food, my drink as well as my life-breath. I want to live only on thy mercy and compassion. They will be my life-substance and elements.

(Chapter VII, Page 96, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Weel 404

(Prayer to the Saint of Nimbargi 2 of 5)

...there should only be two occupations...viz. thy contemplation and thy service. If I want to serve I must serve you and your cause.

(Chapter VII, Page 96, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 403

(Prayer to the Saint of Nimbargi 1 of 5)

...let me not be attracted by the greatness and importance of the world; instead, let thy greatness fill the world. God's greatness is the only reality and not worldly greatness.

(Chapter VII, Page 96, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 402

...the effects of spiritual realisation. The first effect is that fear departs from the mind of such a disciple...'when there is a second or another person fear arises'. But when I alone exist and there is no second, there is no fear. Similarly 'One who knows the joy of Brahman never fears.'

(Chapter VI, Page 90, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 401

If you really believe in God, if you lead a spiritual life, God will save you in the midst of temptations.

(Chapter VI, Page 89, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)


Week 400

You cannot shift your own responsibility on to others and justify your conduct. You have to censure yourself. It is the principle of freedom which enables you either to do good or to do evil. If you do good, of course it is for you to thank yourself, but if you do evil you have yourself to blame. It is no use justifying the attitude of Duryodhana who disowned responsibility for his own actions.

(Chapter VI, Page 85, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 399

...what is the use of coming to this terrestrial existence if after putting faith in the spiritual teacher we do not become even like unto him who imparted to us spiritual wisdom?...

(Chapter V, Page 64, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 398

Bhavataraka tells us that if we stand in the middle of the ocean of life and if we call upon God even once, God will listen, remember and answer us.

(Chapter V, Page 64, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 397

If one is to pursue God one should not humble oneself before persons who are unworthy of reverence and spread one's hands for begging before everybody whom one meets, unmindful of the full presence of the philosopher's stone in the form of God inside one's own Self

(Chapter IV, Page 60, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 396

A great horticultural metaphor by Sarpabhushana - You have the field of the body with you. Why don't you raise a crop of God in this field, the poet asks us. What you have to do is to go through the seven agricultural operations. First, you have to employ good, silent oxen, not turbulent oxen which will play mischief. Tranquility and self-control should be the the oxen you employ for the first operation upon the field of your body. The plough is your moral consciousness and by means of that you should plough the field.Then there are certain weeds (karike) of egoism which you should clear away and fourthly, you should spread the manure of equanimity and make the field quite level. Unless you have spread out the manure, put it inside the earth and made the ground level, the crop will not come up. So spread the manure of equanimity in order that the whole thing becomes ready for further steps.Sow the seed of your spiritual teacher's instruction. But then mere seeds would not be of much value unless the rain pours down. The rain is your meritorious deeds. If the rain fails, the seed will be scorched away. It is the rain of your meritorious deeds which will help the growth of the seed. And when the crop will grow, there will also be superfluous growth of vicious weeds along with it, 'remove the weed, in the form of evil of tendencies and bad deeds and then the crop becomes plentiful. After you have gone through all these operations, if by God's grace the crop comes up, enjoy the crop and live upon the bliss of God-enjoyment....When you have enjoyed the bliss from this crop of spiritual realisation you will be in a position to push back the famine of worldly existence to its borders. Drive the famine away, do not allow it to enter your territory. In that way you will have grown a great spiritual crop, says Gurusiddha.

(Chapter IV, Page 56-57, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 395

'be silent, O my tongue.'...Some of the greatest blunders which we commit in our life are those that are due to the tongue....But remember, says Nirupadhisaddha, 'you should bid goodbye even to the sense of egoism that you are a great Mauni. '

(Chapter IV, Page 53-54, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 394

Approach your spiritual teacher, he (Saint of Nimbargi) says, and begin your spiritual life in right earnest; do not merely make a show of it.

(Chapter IV, Page 53, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 393

As the great saint Vyasa puts it, people do desire the fruits of holy actions but do not do the actions themselves; they do not desire the fruits of evil actions but do them in all possible ways. So you should be always very careful. When you will be caught up in the grip of death your mind will suffer from qualms of conscience and cry remorsefully, 'O God, I am dying!'. So before you get those pangs you must see that God becomes your friend.

(Chapter IV, Page 53, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 392

What is the use of simply entertaining holy ideas and doing unholy things?

(Chapter IV, Page 53, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 391

'take away the twists of my mind, O God.'...the saint of Nimbargi prays to God to disentangle and straighten the crookedness of his mind. Human mind is very crooked. He requests God to make it straight. The first thing that one does after getting up from the bed, he says, is to talk evil of the good people and to denude the people of their property. Besides these two things a man always flatters the great, the wise, the rich and the powerful. Then again we entertain holy ideas only for a time while we always pursue only the unholy ones.

(Chapter IV, Page 52-53, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 390

Death comes like a hurricane and when people are caught up in the hurricane everything would go up in it and would come to an end. So before this hurricane attacks you, make sure that you will not be encircled by it. How foolishly have you forgotten the Lord of the Yadavas? Money, grains and sons won't protect you on such an occasion. So the question arises: when will you begin to remember God? Purandaradasa says, 'you should not ask the question; begin just now,...,'even now, worship God with one-pointed devotion.' So begin to pray to God with concentrated mind even from the present moment, do not delay.

(Chapter IV, Page 52, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 389

...when messengers of death come and attack you, 'will they wait for a while if you request them to do so?' So, long before they make their appearance one should be prepared spiritually to withstand the attack and make up one's mind to enter on the spiritual path.

(Chapter IV, Page 51, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 388

During youth when one's senses are hale and sound, one should not go mad after women and wealth and waste one's life merely in the enjoyment of sensuous pleasures. It as good as fasting if one fails to taste the ambrosia of God's name which is the main purpose of human life.

(Chapter IV, Page 51, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 387

As a dog or a hog moves from house to house so does a man, from life to life. He foolishly identifies his Self with the body which is constituted by the five material elements. He is deluded by it and fails to realise his identity with God. He fails to understand that the wishfulfilling philosopher's stone in the form of God is inside himself and goes on begging from others. Kudaluresa advises us to realise the identity of God with the Self within.

(Chapter IV, Page 50, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 386

The human body is the field. It should be tilled with the help of the oxen of tranquility and self-control. The weeds of egoism should be removed; the manure of equanimity should be evenly spread over the field and the field completely levelled. Then the seed of the instruction of the spritual teacher should be sown. The rain of meritorious actions should water the field and the superfluous growth of viscious deeds should be weeded out. This will enable one to rear the rich crop of eternal liberation and push away the famine of worldly existence out of borders.

(Chapter IV, Page 50, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 385

Purandaradasa urges us to to begin spiritual practices immediately as it is never too late too mend.

(Chapter IV, Page 49, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 384

(next update scheduled for July 17th, 2008)

Purandaradasa asks us to control our senses and to use them not for worldly pleasure but in the service of God, so that we may taste by the grace of God the ambrosial juice from the name of God. No relative and nothing in the world will protect us from the servants of the god of death when they come to take us away from thus world. We should therefore, have a firm hold on spiritual life before the attack comes.

(Chapter IV, Page 48-49, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

(to mark Gurudeo Punyatithi Saptah, Nimbal Jun 9 to 13)

...quintessence of the mystical experiences of God-realisation in all ages and climes, and particularly as given in the Upanisads. It is only an infinitesimal spark of this experience which the Bhagavadgita has portrayed for us in that one cryptic utterance, "yatra chaivatmanaatmaanam pashyannaatmani tushyati" (VI. 20). Probably there was no occasion for the writer of the Bhagavadgita to expand or expatiate on this theme. The present writer has done the work of that expatiation on behalf of the Bhagavadgita.

(page 234, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Badarayana has told us that a saint who has realised God gets all the powers of God, except the power of creation. But unless at least an iota of that power has descended upon the God-realiser, he may hardly be said to have realised God at all.

(page 238, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God Realisation, R D Ranade)

Week 381

Whatever you desire, O God, is welcome to me. If we just submit to God in this way He would be gracious to lead us towards Himself.

(Chapter III, Page 43, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 380

...'why are you anxious?....Who is it that maintains without support the canopy of the sky over our heads and who is it that directs the motions of the sun and the moon?' It is God who by means of his motion gives a push to the sun and moon as well as keeps the canopy eternally hanging over our heads. So God is everywhere. God is omnipotent. Let us submit ourselves to God. When our mind has merged itself in God then alone shall we be free from all sorts of anxieties, because everything that happens to us does so by the will and direction of God.

(Chapter III, Page 42, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 379

The whole of biology is an illustration of the working of God just as the whole of physics also is. Science is the demonstration of the power of God.

(Chapter III, Page 41, Pathway to GOD in Kannada literature)

Week 378

...liberation is attained only on the basis of moral and spiritual development and is not dependent upon times, days and seasons.

(Chapter III, Page 32, The Bhagavadgita: as a Philosophy Of God Realisation)

Week 377

Prior to all human will and work, God has already willed that a certain thing shall happen.

(Chapter XIII, Page 142, The Bhagavadgita: as a Philosophy Of God Realisation)

Week 376

What else can a man do than be struck dumb before this inscrutable Being? God is super-powerful. We have only to reconcile ourselves to the Will of this Super-powerful. Let us, therefore, as Otto tells us, find peace in the idea that God is so powerful that we have only to surrender ourselves entirely to His Will.

(Chapter XIII, Page 141, The Bhagavadgita: as a Philosophy Of God Realisation)

Week 375

Various Sciences have tried to take the measure of God, says Ekanatha, and yet God has remained immeasurable (Abg. 150)

(Chapter VIII Page 227, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 374

A man, who has no real devotion, even though learned, looks like a courtesan, who puts on different kinds of ornaments. (Ekanath Abg 48)

(Chapter VIII Page 223, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 373

Is it not wonderful...that the spiritual life, which is sweet in itself, appears sour to the man who has no belief in God...disbelief is the cause of many vices. It produces egoism, and destroys the spiritual life. One may say that disbelief if the crown of all sins. (Ekanath Abg 12,14)

(Chapter VIII Page 220, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 372

There is no use going to places of pilgrimage. If the mind becomes pure, God lives in our very house, and can be seen by the devotee wherever he may be.

(Chapter VIII Page 219, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 371

Harbour no thought of otherness about other beings.

(Chapter VIII Page 219, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 370

There is no other remedy for spiritual knowledge than the utterance of God's name

(Chapter VIII Page 219, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 369

He who is befriended by God, becomes an object of favour for the whole world. God sees that such a devotee lacks nothing, and He takes on Himself the duty of protecting him in calamities. He does not stay away from His devotee even for a single moment, and on critical occasions, invariably lends His helping hand - (Janabai Abg.30)

(Chapter VIII Page 207, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 368

As a bird may go to roam in the sky and still think of its young one, or as a mother may be engaged in the house-hold duties and yet may think of her child, or as a she-monkey may leap from tree to tree and yet may clasp its young one to her bosom, similarly, says Janabai, we should always think of Vitthala.

(Chapter VIII Page 205, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 367

...unless we take leave of all egoism, God shall not come to our hands (Abg. 4 - Janabai)

(Chapter VIII Page 205, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 366

Janabai...tells us that as a fly in the vanity of pleasure falls upon the flame of a lamp, similarly, people in this life fall upon sensual pleasures in order to kill themselves.

(Chapter VIII Page 205, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 365

Chokha tells us that while we are engaged in the Name of God, we need have no cause for fear, or anxiety.

(Chapter VIII Page 204, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 364

Chokha is convinced that the real Pandhari is his own body, that his soul is the deity Vitthala therein...He tells us that a sugar-cane may be crooked, and yet its juice is not crooked. A bow may be curved, and yet the arrow is not curved. A river may have windings, and yet the water has no windings. Chokha may be untouchable, but his heart is not untouchable.

(Chapter VIII Page 204, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 363

Samvata ...by the power of God's name, one may bid good-bye to all feeling of fear, and deal a blow on the head Death. By the power of God's name, one can bring God from heaven to earth, and sing and dance in His praise. Samvata thus implores all people to follow the path of Bhakti: for God is surely attained by Bhakti, says Samvata.

(Chapter VIII Page 203, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 362

Our bliss is with ourselves; it does not lie in any external object. If we possess merely discrimination and dispassion, the way is open for us to know God.

(Chapter VIII Page 202, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 361

It would not be possible for any one to meet God until one's egoism is at an end.

(Chapter VIII Page 202, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 360

He alone, says Namadeva, can be awake who has a determined faith in the words of his teacher. What lamp can we light in order to see our Self? He, who gives light to the sun and the moon, cannot Himself be seen by any other light.

(Chapter VIII Page 201, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 359

Utter now the name of God.

(Chapter VIII Page 200, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 358

There is only one favour that we should ask of God: that we should always think of Him in our heart; that we should always utter His name by our mouth; that we should always see Him with our eyes; that our hands should worship only Him; that our head be placed always at His feet; that our ears should only hear of God's exploits; that He should show Himself always to our right and to our left, before and after, and at the end of our life. We should ask God of no other favour except this.

(Chapter VIII Page 200, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 357

Namadeva supposes that the faculty of God-realisation is a God-given gift. A cow gives birth to a calf in a forest: who sends the calf, asks Namadeva, to the udders of the cow? Who teaches the young one of a serpent the art of biting? A Mogara flower stands of itself at the top of a creeper: who teaches it to be fragrant? Even if we manure a bitter gourd-creeper with sugar and milk, it makes the fruits of the gourd more bitter still. A sugar-cane shall never leave its sweetness, if it is cut to pieces, or even if it is swallowed. Similarly, says Namadeva, the faculty of realising God is a native faculty, and by that alone will one be able to realise God.

(Chapter VIII Page 199, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 356

He alone is a Saint, says Namadeva, who is able to show God.

(Chapter VIII Page 198, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 355

As trees do not know honour and dishonour, as they are equal to those who worship them and those who cut them, similarly, the saints in their supreme courage look upon honour and dishonour alike.

(Chapter VIII Page 198, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 354

Him alone we may call a saint, says Namadeva, who sees God in all beings; who looks upon gold as a clod of earth; who looks upon a jewel as a mere stone; who has driven out of his heart anger and passion; who harbours peace and forgiveness in his mind; whose speech is given merely to the utterance of God's name.

(Chapter VIII Page 197-198, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 353

Is it not wonderful, asks Namadeva, that people should give up the animate, and hold the inanimate as superior to it? They pluck a living Tulsi plant, and with it worship an inanimate stone. They pluck the leaves of Bela, and throw them in numbers upon a lingam of Siva....People worship a serpent made of mud, but they take cudgels against a living serpent. All these pursuits are vain, says Namadeva: the only pursuit of value is the utterance of the Name of God.

(Chapter VIII Page 197, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 352

People forget, says Namadeva, that their bodily miseries are due to the sins they have committed. Nobody should expect a sweet fruit when he sows a sour seed....We should not grow wroth with our fate, says Namadeva : we should ask ourselves what we have done.

(Chapter VIII Page 196, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 351

Children send a kite into the sky with a rope in their hands; but their attention is upon the kite, and not upon the rope. A woman from Gujerath goes with pitcher piled upon pitcher, moving her hands freely, but her attention is riveted upon the pitchers...We may carry on any pursuit, says Namadeva, provided we always think of God.

(Chapter VIII Page 196, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 350a

There is neither time nor season for the meditation of God. There is neither a high caste nor low in His meditation. He who is the Ocean of love and pity shall come to the succour of all.

(Chapter VIII Page 194, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 350 (was repeated in 269a)

Mountains of sin shall perish in an instant at the utterance of the name of God.

(Chapter V Page 168, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 349

The spiritual teacher is an invariable protector of his disciple. Like a wish tree he yields all desires to a devotee.

(Chapter V Page 168, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 348

There is no use lashing the body until we have conquered our mind.

(Chapter V Page 168, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 347

Only him should we call our Guru, who is able to show God directly to our sight.

(Chapter V Page 167, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 346

The spiritual aspirant gains the ripe fruit of self-realisation only when he implicitly acts according to the orders of his spiritual teacher.

(Chapter IV Page 162, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 345

...for securing actionlessness in the midst of action, four kinds of help are suggested. The first is the performance of an action as a matter of social duty; the second is its performance without any feeling of attachment; the third is the renunciation of its fruit; the fourth and the last is a more positive help, namely, the offering of all actions to God.

(Chapter III, Page 103, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 344

...equanimity...such a man knows no unevenness of temper. He is equal to his friends and foes. As a lamp does not think that it must produce light for those to whom it belongs, and create darkness for those to whom it does not belong; as the tree gives the same shade to a man who puts his axe at its root as well as to him who rears it up; as a sugarcane is not sweet to the man who has reared it, and sour to the man who presses it; similarly , the man of equanimity is alike to friend and foe, as well as to honour and dishonour. He is not moved by praise, nor is his mind disturbed by words of censure.....

(Chapter III, Page 94, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 343

We must eat food, but take it only in a measured quantity. We must do actions, but in a measured manner. We must speak measured words. We must measure our steps. We may also by measure go to sleep. If we are to keep awake, that also we must do by measure. In this way, when equanimity is produced in the body, great happiness will arise.

(Chapter III, Page 94, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 342

God is not very distant from those who have conquered their hearts, and have stilled their passions. When the dross material in base gold has been driven off, what remains is pure gold itself; similarly, when desire disappears, the Individual Soul becomes Brahman.

(Chapter III, Page 93-94, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 341

A pure man...washes off his bodily sins by good actions, and shines internally by knowledge; in this way, he becomes illuminative on both sides. On the other hand, a man whose mind is not pure, can scarcely be said to be pure even if he does good actions...Such a man is of as little use as an arch-way built in a deserted place...He is like a showy pitcher which contains nothing, even though it may shine externally...It is, therefore, that we may say that a man should have internal knowledge, as well as have pure actions; the one takes away the dirt from the inside, the other from the outside...

(Chapter III, Page 77-78, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 340

The ideal sage is harmless even in speech; his love moves first, and then move the words from his mouth; compassion comes first, and then the words. Is it possible that the words coming from such a man may do injury to any one? He remains silent for fear of breaking the peace of men, for fear of being even so much as the cause of the raising of eyebrows in others; and if, when lovingly requested, he opens his mouth, he is as kind to his hearers as a father and mother; his words sing the mystic sound incarnate......True and soft, measured and sweet, his words are as it were the waves of nectar. They have once for all taken leave of opposition, argument, force, injury to beings, ridicule, persecution, touch to the quick,......greed, doubt and deceit. (Jnanesvari XIII. 261-272)

(Chapter III, Page 74, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 339

An unpretentious man...his merit he never lets fly on a highly-raised banner...size of a plantain tree looks small, and yet it is rich in fruits which are full of sweetness; a cloud looks as if it may be blown by a wind, but it sends down rain in plenty. By these marks must one know a man who takes pride in unpretentiousness.

(Chapter III, Page 72-73, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 338

An humble man ...is forgetful of his own greatness, does not judge about the propriety or impropriety of other's actions, and bows down in modesty when any person whatsoever is mentioned; as water comes down from the top of a mountain and silently moves to the earth, even so, such a man is humble before everybody; as the branches of a tree, which is laden with fruits, are bent down to the earth, even so such a man feels humility before every being. (Jnanesvari IX. 221-227)

(Chapter III, Page 72, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 337

Humility...One should never allow respect to be shown to oneself; one should never so much as be the cause of the praise of one's own particular greatness. A man must feel mortified when people bow to him...

(Chapter III, Page 72, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 336

The senses are so strong that even those, who are given to the practice of Yoga, and who have acquired all the necessary virtues for the practice of it, those, in fact, who are holding their minds in the hollow of their hands, even these are seduced, as an exorcist is seduced; and when on a higher level of Yoga-practice, new objects of sense are created, and new kinds of power and prosperity open before the practiser of Yoga, these exercise a new charm, and seduce and turn away the mind of the spiritual aspirant, with the result that their practice in Yoga is stopped; such is the great seductive power of the senses (Jnanesvari II. 311-314) !

(Chapter III, Page 71, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 335

...the aspirant...is not elated when people praise him to the skies nor does he feel depressed when they speak ill of him....Jesus Christ has taught us to love our enemies, to bless them that curse us, to do good to them that hate us and pray for even those who spitefully use us and persecute us.

(Chapter VII, Page 301-302, Pathway to God in Kannada Literature)

Week 334

...unless a man has stopped from doing wrong, unless he has entirely composed himself, it may not be possible for him, however highly-strung his intellect may be, to reach the Self by force of mere intellect.

(Chapter VII, Page 241, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 333

...the river of desire runs between the banks of good and bad, but that, by the effort of our will, we should compel it to move in the direction of the good.

(Chapter VI, Page 230, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 332

...a man can have all his desires fulfilled, and obtain any world he may seek, even if he only waits upon and worships a Mystic who has realised the Self

(Chapter VII, Page 256, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 331

...it is only when the whole moral being is purged of evil that one is able to realise the greatness of God.

(Chapter VII, Page 250, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 330

Arise, Awake and learn from those who are better than ye...

(Chapter VII, Page 242, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 329

...there can be no true mysticism unless it is based upon the sure foundation of morality, so morality to be perfect must end in the mystical attitude...The Upanishadic Sage believes in the possibility of greater or less mystical realisation for every being according to the greater or less worth of his character, belief, and endeavour: he sees Atman in all, and sees the Atman alone.

(Chapter VI, Page 230, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 328

Man in the foolishness of the contemplation of his small success regards himself to be the lord of all he surveys; he believes that he may be the master of any situation in which he may be placed, and that he may compel nature any time to bend to his sovereign will; but events in life prove that these are after all false expectations, and that even though a little freedom may be granted to man in small matters, he is yet not free in the highest sense of the term. Pent up within the goal, he thinks like a prisoner that he is free; but he is free only to drink and eat and not to move about. Like a falcon to whose foot a string is tied, he can only fly in the limited sphere described by the length of the tether, but he is bound beyond that region. Similarly, man may vainly imagine that he is free to do any actions he pleases, but his freedom is the freedom of the tethered falcon.

(Chapter VI, Page 230, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 327

...man is merely a conglomeration of desire, will and action: "as his desire is, so is his will; as is his will, so is the action that he performs; as his action is, so is the fruit that he procures for himself

(Chapter VI, Page 229, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 326

...if a man may tell the Untruth he shall be dried up from the very roots; hence it is...he dare not tell the Untruth. On the other hand...Truth alone becomes victorious in the world, and not a lie; by Truth is paved the path of the gods, by which travel the sages, who have all their desires fulfilled, to where lies the highest Repository of Truth. This is how the practice of Truth as a moral virtue enables one to reach the Absolute.

(Chapter VI, Page 228, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 325

...what were regarded, by the Upanishadic seers, the five chief different kinds of sin. The thief, the drunkard, the adulterer, the Brahmocide, and the man who associates with them, are all worthy of capital punishment.

(Chapter VI, Page 226, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 324

...the three cardinal virtues which are enumerated in the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad.

"Be self-controlled, for otherwise, out of your elation, you might do acts of unkindness"

"Be charitable, and love your fellows"

"Be compassionate. Be kind to those with whom you would be otherwise cruel"

(Chapter VI, Page 226, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 323

...even in the midst of the life of action actionless may be secured, only if attachment to action is annihilated once for all and no calculating desire is entertained for the fruit of action.

(Chapter VI, Page 218, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 322

...there are two different paths, the path of the good and the path of the pleasant, and that these two diverse paths try to seduce a man each to itself. Of these, he who follows the path of the good is ultimately rewarded by the fulfillment of his aim, while he who follows the path of the pleasant loses the goal which he is pursuing. When the good and the pleasant present themselves before a man, he looks about him if he be wise, and decides which of them to choose. The wise man chooses the good before the pleasant, while the fool chooses the pleasant before the good.

(Chapter VI, Page 215, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 321

It is neither the Society, nor the State, nor God, who can give us the essential rule for moral conduct. This must spring entirely from within ourselves.

(Chapter VI, Page 214, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 320

Unless it were possible to know the wishes of God in every particular case affecting moral conduct, unless it were possible even so much as to note what principles in general might be regarded as constituting the wishes of God - if we were not to understand these as identical with the dictates of Conscience which is the candle of the Lord within us - it might not seem very possible to set down in detail the Laws of God as enjoining the performance of certain duties upon us, in preference to, or in cancelment of, other duties.

(Chapter VI, Page 213-214, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 319

...we should always mould our conduct on the pattern of the conduct of those who are better than ourselves and are in a position to give us rules of conduct by their example.

(Chapter VI, Page 213, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 318

Intelligence without the moral backbone might only degenerate into the cleverest forms of chicanery, and a mystic without morality, if such a one were possible, might only be a hideous creature who is a blot on the spiritual evolution of man.

(Chapter VI, Page 211, Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy, R D Ranade - 1986 edition)

Week 317

Foolish people say that he alone is a blessed man who meets with a 'euthanasia'. They falsely imagine that God meets a man at the time of his death. They never turn their life to good account, and they expect to see God !

(Chapter XIX, Page 408, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 316

...the devotee must pant for God like a fish out of waters...If a man does not possess it (spring of devotion) by birth, he may come to acquire it by a life of prolonged moral travail, and then he may be able to realise God.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 363-364 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 315

...the moral virtues essential for spiritual realisation, we might say that the spiritual seeker must have the following virtues. He must make an active effort for the achievement of his ideal; he must not care for the derision of the world; he should utter the name of God with pleasure or displeasure, faith or misfaith, sloth or even malignity. Finally, he must bid good-bye to all sense of self-importance which is often too subtle even for those who are given to heart searching.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 359 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 314

Love and sense of honour...do not go together. The same scabbard cannot hold two scimitars. Unless, therefore, we bid goodbye to all sense of egoism, we cannot prosper in the spiritual life.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 359 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 313

... the way of egoism is not the way of God...It would be easier for a camel to enter the hole of a needle than for the tall-talker to enter the kingdom of God.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 359 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 312

The ... virtue which the seeker must possess is meditation on God in all mental conditions whatsoever. Tulsidas tells us that we should utter the name of God under all circumstances. The seed takes root whether it faces upwards or downwards. We must not mind whether we utter the name of God with pleasure or displeasure, in happiness or in grief.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 358 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 311

...it is only those who seek, to them comes the reward of their effort. The door shall not open unless you knock it.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 357 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 310

As mental concentration is the 'sine qua non' of a successful meditation, moral qualities are equally, if not more, necessary. In the first place, the aspirant must make an active search for the Object of his realisation; no inaction would do, no indifference, no mental complacency to allow things to come their own way, and in their own time.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 356-357 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 309

A mental requirement for successful meditation is the occupation of the mind by only one idea and no other. When the eye is full of the vision of the only one object of our love, says Rahim, no other vision is possible. When the mind is filled with one idea, no other idea dare enter. This is the chief aim an aspirant must always keep in view. Analogies for this description...a railway carriage full of passengers not allowing any new passenger to get in, and a cinema-house, which is full of spectators refusing to admit any further spectator The seeker, likewise, must therefore refuse to admit within his mind any idea except that of God. It is only when such a thing takes place, that spiritual concentration becomes fruitful.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 356 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 308

A bad idea occurring to the mind does not necessarily make a man a bad character, says Kabir; but an evil action certainly does.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 355 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 307

...a kumbhakar gives continuous strokes to the pot from the outside, but gives it a constant and unfailing support from within. Similarly, in the midst of the calamities and misfortunes which might fall to the lot of his disciple, the spiritual teacher gives him internal and continuous support, and enables him to face boldly his trials and tribulations. Every misfortune, every calamity, has now a silver lining for him. The Sun of his Guru's grace shines through the edge of his misfortunes, though these for a while might darken the luminosity of his spiritual life.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 337 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 306

Unless we place our fullest reliance upon God, it will not be possible for us to reach the state to which we aspire.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 330 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 305

...God is not like other masters. His reward precedes service, as in the case of other masters it follows.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 325 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 304

"Having come into world, we should run to meet and embrace every human being. For, we do not know in what form Narayana may appear." Tulsidas advises us to believe that the whole world is filled with God, and that all beings are His manifestations.

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 293 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 303

...we should always hold our hand aloft in the position of giving, and never down in the position of receiving. It is better to die, says Tulsidas, than to spread out one's hand for the sake of begging.

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 290 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 302

...the same drop of water can become either a pearl, red colour, or poison, according as it comes to be lodged in a shell, or in a flower of the Kadali tree, or in the mouth of a serpent......an original constitution is capable of being affected by company and become either of the Sattva, Rajas or Tamas type.

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 284 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 301

We need not deny material welfare even if we pursue spiritual welfare, and a true moral philosopher would be he who would reconcile them in a proper perspective.

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 283 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)


Week 300

We should not allow even a single breath to pass unutilized. It would not be impossible to fasten your mind on God, while your hand is doing its work.

(Chapter V, Page 257 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 299

Things which are impossible to achieve without the help of God become easily possible by His Grace....What cannot the Grace of God do?

(Chapter V, Page 200 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 298

Kabir advises us not to miss the opportunity provided by this life. Let us remember, he says, that we may not be born upon the earth from time to time. An opportunity missed is an opportunity lost!

(Chapter IV, Page 178 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 297

It is the grace of God which supersedes any other sources of strength which man may fondly cling to in his heart.

(Chapter IV, Page 183 Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 296

Unless we realize our absolute impotence before the majestic power of God, it may not be possible for God's Grace to descend upon us.

(Chapter IV, Page 181-182, Pathway to God in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 295

Nanak advises us to continue our spiritual meditation to the very end of our life...moments are passing away from our life, as drops of water from a pitcher with a hole. He, therefore, advises us to look at the different places, and times, and conditions through which our life has passed. He says this will fill us with the idea of giving a good account of ourselves during remaining part of our life.

(Chapter IV, Page 160 - 161, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 294

Tulsidas asks us why not make a combination of Mati and Kriya, why not make reason the mate of action. Let the golden thread of thought pass through the jewels of actions and produce a beautiful necklace. Do good things, and think of good things, and adorn the neck of Rama by this beautiful necklace.

(Chapter IV, Page 153, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 293

...Kabir gives us two rules of conduct, one the negative and the other the positive. Negatively, he tells us that we should habituate ourselves to forget the world from time to time, considering its entire ephemerality. Positively, Kabir advises us to keep the goal we have in view fixedly before our mind and to pursue it relentlessly. When this is done, says Kabir, then the aspirant would be able to see the glittering light of God inside the tabernacle of his heart. This is an indication of God's presence and grace, and a sure harbinger of future progress.

(Chapter IV, Page 145, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 292

...moral characteristic of a Sadguru, according to Kabir, is that he maintains full actionlessness in the midst of action....A man who devotes all his actions to God really remains actionless.

(Chapter IV, Page 138, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 291

Whatever move a novice may make in a game of chess, the expert has the ability always to make such a move as to defeat all the moves of the novice. We in this world are novices. We are making our own moves. If we pray to God, it rests with him in His benevolent omniscience to make such a move as to destroy our moves in their badness, and lead them on to good. (James - "Will to Believe")

(Chapter III, Page 121, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 290

Moral virtues...cannot be achieved in a single day...We must continuously practise these virtues until they become perfect in us...character is habit. When we add one instance of a particular virtue to another, day after day, then we can say that that particular virtue becomes established in us.

(Chapter 2, Page 84, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 289

A Brahmin, according to Charandas, is one who has realised Brahman...One who has realised Brahman is entitled to the name of a Brahmana...These doctrines must be carefully remembered by those who might regard a Brahmana as one who belongs to a particular social caste.

(Chapter 2, Page 55, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 288

It is much better not to talk at all, than to talk and not to do....Action, says Charandas, is the cradle of God. The saints act as they speak, and it is for this reason that they attain to divinity.

(Chapter 2, Page 52, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 277

Absence of real devotion makes God stand away from those who entertain doubt and fear......God knows the hearts of all, and will reward them as they deserve. (Tukarama Abg. 3874)

(Chapter XII, Page 245, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 276

Upon one who is attached to worldly objects nothing can confer greater benefit than the discharge of the duty of the station in which he may be placed. The performance of duty alone has the power to purify the mind...The selfless discharge of one's duty pleases God. It can, therefore, be well called a boat which will help a man to cross the worldly ocean. (Ekanatha Bhagavata, XVIII, 380-387)

(Chapter XII, Page 245, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 275

Ekanatha...treats at great length the qualifications of one fit for Bhakti......Having heard from the lips of the saints the greatness and mercy of God, a strong conviction is produced in him that the true goal of man's life is to secure God's grace. But unfortunately he has not the courage or the strength to free himself from the worldly bonds, and thus betakes himself to a solitary place to meditate on God. He is intellectually convinced of the emptiness of the world. But his attachment towards the world will not allow him to break with it. And he has therefore to stay on in the midst of a life which practically bores him......He lives in a worldly life, but does not, and cannot enjoy it. In such a state, he prays to God day and night for succour. Such a man, who is neither completely free from desire, nor is completely attached to sense-objects, but is all the while praying to God, may be called a Bhakta. To him, God reveals Himself, pleased by his constant prayer. (Ekanatha Bhagavata, XX, 78-87)

(Chapter XII, Page 245, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 274

Ekanatha exhorts men to understand how precious this human life is. It is easy to be born either in hell or in heaven; because the former is the effect of the excess of demerit, while the latter is the result of excess of merit. A human birth on the other hand is possible only when merit and demerit balance each other. Coupled with the accidental character of human birth, if one were to note the impossibility of God-vision in any other life, one need not be told that one must make haste to realise the divinity in himself. If a man were to reason that he would try for spiritual life after he had gratified his sense, let him remember, says Ekanatha, that Death is certain, and no one knoweth the day and hour when Death will lay his icy hand on us....Slaying sloth, conquering sleep, let a man watch and pray day an night, for "ye know not what hour your Lord doth come" (Ekanatha Bhagavata, II.22-30)

(Chapter XII, Page 248-249, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 273

The true God is indeed He who lived before creation, just as the potter lived before the pot......We must remember that He who creates the world must necessarily exist before the world......He is changeless.....God cannot be born and God cannot die.

(Dasabodha VIII.1.8-50)

(Chapter XIX, Page 375, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 272

When God once calls a man His own, one cannot imagine what he may do. His justice, his forethought, his ready wisdom, and his knowledge of other people's hearts are all of them the gifts of God. His efforts, his alertness, his courage in the nick of time, his great prowess are all of them the gifts of God. His fame, his power, his greatness, and his incomparably rare qualities are all the gifts of God... (Dasabodha XVIII.6.9-20)

(Chapter XIX, Page 375, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 271

It is not mere penance; it is not bodily tormentation that wins God for the seeker...it was Bhava or internal devotion that enabled one to see God.

(Chapter XVII, Page 88, The Bhagavadgita: as a Philosophy Of God Realisation)

Week 270

There is neither time nor season for the utterance of God's name. (Abg 24, Jnanadeva)

(Chapter XII, Page 168, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 269a (Week 269 was repeated)

Mountains of sin shall perish in an instant at the utterance of God's name. (Abg 20, Jnanadeva)

(Chapter XII, Page 168, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 269

Who has the power to frighten this servant of God? When, with His burning disc, God in person is ready to guard His devotee, who can attack him? No obstacle can present itself before him. (Ekanatha Bhagavata.XXIII.446-451)

(Chapter XII, Page 255, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 268

...a true Samadhi, resulting from the teaching of a true Spiritual Teacher, is entirely compatible with action. It is not a loss of consciousness, or motionlessness, but a constant divine experience. (Ekanatha Bhagavata.II.423-432)

(Chapter XII, Page 255, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 267

We must remember that we have to die some day. Hence it is that we must try to please all. (Dasabodha XII.2.15-26)

(Chapter XIX, Page 416, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 266

If the Ideal Man were not to forgive people for their ignorance, he would merely bring himself on a level with them. If pieces of a sandal tree are not rubbed on a sandstone, they would not produce a fragrant scent, and then they would be on par with pieces of other trees. (Dasabodha XII.2.15-26)

(Chapter XIX, Page 415-416, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 265

A great man must be able to create great men. (Dasabodha XI.10)

(Chapter XIX, Page 414, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 264

In order to visit places of pilgrimage, we undertake long journeys. But we need not go anywhere to see God. We can see Him wherever we are. (Dasabodha XX.10.1-23)

(Chapter XIX, Page 413, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 263

Mystic reality ...is described by Ramadasa as ..."that which the weapons cannot pierce, which the fire cannot burn, which cannot be moistened by water, which cannot be blown away by wind, which can neither fall down nor wear away, which cannot be manufactured, and which cannot be hidden....it is omnipresent...can be attained only by spiritual meditation. It is neither earth, nor water, nor fire, nor wind. That indeed deserves the name of God. But ordinary people have each of them a god in their village. (Dasabodha VI.2.15-27)

(Chapter XIX, Page 411-412, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 262

No thieves can take away the treasure of spiritual experience. There is no fear to it from a king, nor any danger from fire, not can a cruel beast ever pounce on it.....This spiritual experience can be obtained only on the strength of the merit during the whole course of our lives, and then shall the supreme God reveal Himself to us. (Dasabodha I.9.2-24)

(Chapter XIX, Page 411, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 261

Mystic experience is a sealed book to many, for verily they do not know the secret of the company of the Good. (Dasabodha I.9.2-24)

(Chapter XIX, Page 411, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 260

A spiritual seeker, however, has only to depend on himself for the attainment of God. For "according as his inner emotion is, similarly does God manifest Himself to him. He knows the inner feelings of men. If a man tries to cheat God, God will first cheat him. God behaves with men only as they deserve. He gives satisfaction to His devotees only according to the quality of their devotion. But as soon as there is any deficit in their sentiment, He also moves away. The image of our face that we see in a mirror is exactly like our face. If we stare at the image, that also stares at us. If we bend our brow, that also bends it brow. If we laugh, that also laughs. According to our sentiments are, similarly God behaves with us, and He rewards us only according to our worth. (Dasabodha III. 13-19)

(Chapter XIX, Page 410-411, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 259

When a man is allowed to come in the presence of a King, he becomes a rich man; similarly, when we enter the company of the Good, we immediately attain to God. (Dasabodha VI. 9.1-20)

(Chapter XIX, Page 410, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 258

God knows how to maintain His friendship, and we should only seek after His affection. The friendship of God is unbreakable, and the love of God is undiminished.........Hence we should be friends of God, and communicate to Him our innermost desires.........(Dasabodha IV. 8)

(Chapter XIX, Page 406, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 257

The Ideal Man loves to put forth effort, enters boldly on any enterprise, and does not shun work. He can live in the midst of difficulties, bear the brunt of action, and yet keep himself away from contact with it....He always supports the right cause, and never gives himself to unrighteousness...(Dasabodha XI 6.12-19)

(Chapter XIX, Page 415, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 256

We should first do, and then get done everything by others. We should first discriminate, and then should ask others to do it.... (Dasabodha XIX 10.8-29)

(Chapter XIX, Page 417, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 255

What is censurable we should avoid. What is praiseworthy we should practice. We should avoid evil qualities, and cultivate the good......The one rule of life should be that we should try to please all...Just as one tries to please a child, similarly, we should try to please the people...(Dasabodha XIII 10.20-29)

(Chapter XIX, Page 416, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 254

Good behaviour with others leads to happiness. If we speak bad words, they are echoed back on us. We need not teach other people how to behave; we should teach ourselves. (Dasabodha XII 2.15-26)

(Chapter XIX, Page 416, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 253

The Ideal Man is a practical man. "The fool looks only in one direction, but the wise man looks in all......We should examine various people, should know for what they are competent, and then either hold them near or keep them at a distance. It is only when we assign proper work to proper persons that it is well accomplished. (Dasabodha XI. 10)

(Chapter XIX, Page 414, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 252

In order to visit places of pilgrimage, we undertake long journeys. But we need not go anywhere to see God. We can see Him wherever we are. (Dasabodha XX. 10. 1-23)

(Chapter XIX, Page 413, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 251

Mystic reality is ..."that which the weapons cannot pierce, which the fire cannot burn, which cannot be moistened by water, which cannot be blown away by wind, which can neither fall down nor wear away, which cannot be manufactured, and which cannot be hidden......This Reality can be attained only by spiritual meditation. It is neither earth, nor water, nor fire, nor wind. That indeed deserves the name of God. But ordinary people have each of them a god in their village." (Dasabodha VI. 2. 15-27)

(Chapter XIX, Page 411-412, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 250

Mystic experience is a sealed book to many, for verily they do not know the secret of the company of the Good...No thieves can take away the treasure of spiritual experience. There is no fear to it from a king, nor any danger from fire, nor can a cruel beast ever pounce upon it...It cannot indeed be seen except by the grace of the Guru......This spiritual experience can be obtained only on the strength of the merit during the whole course of our lives, and then shall the supreme God reveal Himself to us. (Dasabodha I. 9.2-24)

(Chapter XIX, Page 411, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 249

A spiritual seeker, however, has only to depend on himself for the attainment of God. For "according as his inner emotion is, similarly does God manifest Himself to him. He knows the inner feelings of men. If a man tries to cheat God, God will first cheat him. God behaves with men only as they deserve. He gives satisfaction to His devotees only according to the quality of their devotion. But as soon as there is any deficit in their sentiment, He also moves away......According as our sentiments are, similarly God behaves with us, and He rewards us only according to our worth.

(Chapter XIX, Page 410-411, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 248

A man who does not sow corn should not expect to reap it......Hence a man who does not give himself in his life to the contemplation of God shell never reach a holy end.

(Chapter XIX, Page 408, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 247

We should not get angry with God, if what we desire is not attained. We should always succumb, without grumbling to the will of God. Then easily will God have a compassion for us...

(Chapter XIX, Page 406, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 246

That God may remain in a friendly way with us depends upon our own way of behaviour with Him; for the echoes of our words come in the very manner in which we utter them. If we solely devote ourselves to God, God becomes solely devoted to us.

(Chapter XIX, Page 405, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 245

An aspirant is indeed he who has gone in all submissiveness to his Teacher ...has once for all bade good-bye to evil actions, and has been multiplying virtuous actions in order that he might ultimately get lodgment in he Form of God...When this mental attitude is firmly fixed in him, he begins to lead a different life in his outward actions. He leaves away all passion and anger, all vanity and jealousy, all shame and pride of family...

(Chapter XIX, Page 404-405, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 244

We should behave exactly as God wishes us to behave...

(Chapter XIX, Page 405, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 243

God...holds the keys of success in His hands. "God is the protector of all beings, and of all worlds......Without God there can be no life......Hence it is, that one should always meditate on God. Meditation gives us great support. Without it we cannot get victory in any work that we undertake. Where God is not present to support us, we would be routed by anybody whatsoever"......no undertaking can succeed unless it is backed up by the presence of God. "When we recognise that God is the real doer in the world, Egoism cannot possess us......" (Dasabodha XVI. 10.23-33;XX.4.26-30)

(Chapter XIX, Page 400, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 242

All Saints, both Indian and Christian, have laid stress upon the efficacy of the Name in fulfilling the ambitions of the spiritual aspirant. "We should always meditate on God," says Ramadasa, "and utter His Name; for satisfaction lies in the uttering of God's Name. We should never forget to meditate in the morning, at mid-day, and in the evening, and should at all times give ourselves to the uttering of God's Name. We should never forget God's Name, whether we may be merged in happiness or in sorrow, in dejection or in anxiety. At the time of joy and at the time of calamity,......at the time of rest and at the time of sleep we should always utter the name of God....By the power of the Name, mountains of sins are destroyed...There is no distinction of caste in the utterance of God's Name. Small men as well as great men, the dull as well as the intelligent, have been saved by the power of the Name..." (Dasabodha IV.3)

(Chapter XIX, Page 399-400, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 241

The true disciple is he, whose heart is not set upon power; who has a firm belief in the words of his master...who is pure and spotless; who is of an ascetic temper...who is endowed with great insight, as he has been able to visualize the invisible Atman; who devotes himself to the service of humanity; who is jealous of none; who has great courage and moral determination...who has suffered great pains, physical, mental and moral; who by the power of the pain has set his heart upon the Eternal in an utter disgust of the evanescent world;......for whom considerations of wealth and prosperity are of no significance; who has his heart purified by repentance; whose mind has been made tranquil by the words of his master; finally, whose pure devotion knows no back-turning, even though the heavens might fall upon him. (Dasabodha V. 3.19-51)

(Chapter XIX, Page 397-398, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 240

Those who harbour a desire for power...are only hunting after an illusion. They have not yet become desireless. Many intelligent men of old have been led astray by this desire for power...Considerations of power and prosperity fill their mind with egoism...Whatever desire there may be in man, except the one for God, will only contribute to his ultimate ruin. When the body falls off, the considerations of power will also cease, while God will have ever kept Himself away from the aspiring soul. (Dasabodha V. 2.33-43)

(Chapter XIX, Page 397, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 239

He who has a desire to see God should move in the company of the good, for without the company of the good, God cannot be attained.

(Chapter XIX, Page 391, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 238

Is it not by the power of the God, he (Ramadasa) asks, that the Sun move across the face of the sky; that the mist in the universe showers immense rain; that the clouds as large as mountains rise up in the sky and hide the disc of the sun; that the wind terribly moves through them; that, like the servant of Destruction, it dispels the clouds and sets the sun free; that thunderbolts shoot on the earth; and that all beings in the world are filled with fear? Wonderful it is that God has set one element against another and thus restored equipoise to Creation. Infinite thus are the ways in which the Atman expresses Himself. It is impossible to know them all. The mind reels in contemplation of them. (Dasabodha XX. 8. 23-29)

(Chapter XIX, Page 384-385, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 237

The body is made of sin, as sin forever is its lot. If one entertains desires inside the body, what can external means do? Let the body be shaved as many times as one pleases in places of pilgrimage; let it be subjected to all kinds of compunctions in holy places; let it be purified as much as you please by different kinds of clay; let it be burnt as much as one wills by heated copper signs;........let a man eat as many balls of cow-dung as he likes; let him drink as many pots of cow's urine as he pleases; let him wear any kinds of rosaries and garlands as he likes; whatever holy costume he may put on, his mind is filled by evil and sin; and in order that the evil and sin may be burnt, Self-knowledge is necessary.....That eternal Form of God, which has been described in the Scriptures, is indeed a Form of the knower himself...Oh ye men of spiritual experience, determine that this knowledge shall abide in you forever by the grace of God. Without it, there would be everywhere grief and sorrow. (Dasabodha X. 10. 59-68)

(Chapter XIX, Page 379, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 236

Whatever sins a man may have committed, whatever miseries he may have been suffering from, Ramadasa tells us, that if he meditates on the Name of God, all his sins and miseries would come to an end. (Dasabodha X. 10. 59-68)

(Chapter XIX, Page 379, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 235

Where God's knowledge is present, there also is success......One should think on God constantly in one's mind. How shall His spouse, the Goddess of Wealth, depart from one who always thinks on God? God is indeed immanent in the whole universe, and we should worship Him as everywhere..... (Dasabodha XV. 9. 18-29)

(Chapter XIX, Page 376, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 234

Ramadasa tells us time and oft that the first thing that a man should do is to believe in God, and the next is to do his duty to himself and to the nation. For, Ramadasa tells us that it is only when our efforts are backed by devotion, that they are likely to succeed.

(Chapter XX, Page 422, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 233

One does not know what calamities may befall us. Hence, we should always be on the alert, should do all that we can for spiritual life, and fill the world with the holy name of God. What we can do soon, we should do immediately. What we cannot do soon, should be done after a mature thought. (Dasabodha XIX. 6. 11-30)

(Chapter XIX, Page 419, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 232

Wherever the wise man is, no quarrel can arise. He does not say one thing to a man's face and another behind him...He never troubles the hearts of people......He always engages himself in conferring obligations on others. He is pained by other people's sufferings, and becomes happy in their happiness. He desires that all people should be happy......When people know that he forgives their faults, then they come and support him. (Dasabodha XIX. 4. 5-31)

(Chapter XIX, Page 418, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 231

One of the most important teachings of Ramadasa about his ideal Sage is that his activity should alternate with meditation. He should lead an intensely active life for some time, and should immediately engage himself in intensive meditation. In that way, both his meditation and his activity become strengthened.

(Chapter XIX, Page 418, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 230

In whatever language we praise God, our praise is equally welcome to Him; for God is Himself the creator of all languages.

(Chapter XI, Page 221, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 229

A single utterance of the name of God creates panic among sins. As soon as God's name is uttered, the divine recorder ceases to record. (Abg 144, Namadeva)

(Chapter VIII, Page 200, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 228

Set thyself to perform thy duty by meditating on God, and thou shalt surely succeed. Only thou shouldst suppose from the bottom of thy heart that God is the real agent and not thyself......If thou regardest thyself as and agent, thou shalt land thyself into many difficulties; on the other hand, if thou believest that God is the real agent, then shalt thou attain to fame, and to greatness, and to power.

(Chapter XIX, Page 376, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 227

The Saints indeed are truly the rich; for they possess in their hands the keys of the spiritual treasure. The spiritually poor have been made by them spiritual Kings of men......Emperors and kings have lived erewhile, but none of them has been able to make a grant of God. The Saints confer a boon which nobody else can confer. There is no limit to the greatness of the Saints, for it is on account of them that God reveals Himself.

(Chapter XIX, Page 395, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 226

...in the human body alone is one able to attain to God. It is only by taking a human body that men have become saints and sages and devotees......Hence if the body is strong and without any disease or defect, it should be forthwith utilized in the service of God...

(Chapter XIX, Page 388, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 225

In order... that a man's mind may be set on God, it is necessary that he should give himself to the reading, or hearing, or meditating, of spiritual literature. Sravana is indeed a very important means of spiritual development. "Sravana creates devotion, Sravana creates dispassion. Sravana purifies the mind. Sravana produces mental determination. Sravana wards off egoism. Sravana gives internal satisfaction. By Sravana, our doubts are resolved. By Sravana, our difficulties come to an end. By Sravana, a man's mind craves for God. Sravana keeps off bad company. Sravana drives off all infatuation. Sravana creates spiritual insight. Sravana endows us with tranquility......Sravana creates repentance. Sravana leads the aspirant onwards in the path of God......As we take food and water day after day, so we should devote ourselves to Sravana time after time..."

(Chapter XIX, Page 401, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 224

We may love God not only because He may crown us with success in our undertakings but because He is Himself worthy of our highest love...Desire indeed may bring the realization of the fruit; but disinterested love brings God Himself nearer to us. One may choose, as he likes, between the fruits of one's actions and the realization of God ! God can bring any fruits to us whatsoever; but a desire for fruits stands between ourselves and God.

(Chapter XIX, Page 400-401, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 223

God is the protector of all beings and of all worlds......Where God is not, nothing can be... Meditation gives us great support. Without it, we cannot get victory in any work that we undertake. Where God is not present to support us, we would be routed by anybody whatsoever...no undertaking can succeed unless it is backed by the presence of God...

(Chapter XIX, Page 400, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 222

People vainly busy themselves in wrangling, without seeing that the name of God leads to the form of God (Abg. 41, Eknatha)

(Chapter XI, Page 222, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 221

God runs to the help of the devotee, if he devoutly remembers Him

(Chapter XI, Page 222, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 220

In whatever language we praise God, our praise is equally welcome to Him; for God is Himself the creator of all languages. (Abg. 27, Eknatha)

(Chapter XI, Page 221, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 219

...victory is always with him who is befriended by God...

(Chapter III, Page 138, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 218

Whatever obligations thou conferest upon another, regard them as offerings to Me......The dislike of beings shall thus depart. (Jnanesvari XVIII. 1353-1367)

(Chapter III, Page 135, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 217

...with the same intensity with which the devotee loves God, does God return the love of the saint.

(Chapter III, Page 134, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 216

...if My devotee has served Me constantly during his life, I become his servant at the time of his death ...When such a man is approaching the time of death, if he remembers Me, and if I do not come to succour him, of what use is his life-long meditation? ... (VIII.120-133)

(Chapter III, Page 133, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 215

...there is no cause for any anxiety whatsoever to My devotees. I come forward to relieve them out of misery. As soon as My devotees have given their heart to Me, I have taken on Myself the obligation of relieving them... (XII.87-96)

(Chapter III, Page 132-133, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 214

I care only for devotion. There is nothing either great or small to Me. I care only for the spirit in which it is offered. A leaf, a flower, or a fruit is only a cause for worshipping Me: but I am really worshipped by one-pointed love (Jnanesvari IX. 382-396)

(Chapter III, Page 132, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 213

...God fulfils all the desires of His Saints...What I now do for them is to make their happiness increase, and turn the gaze of accident from their enjoyment of bliss.

(Chapter III, Page 131, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 212

Jnanesvara tells us that the office of God is always for the welfare of the Saint. "They who have given themselves over to Me with all their heart like a foetus in the womb, which knows no activity on its own account; to whom there is nothing higher than Me; who regard Me as their very life; and who worship Me with a constant one-pointed devotion; these themselves become the objects of worship at My hands. At the very moment that they followed Me with their heart, all their burden of life has fallen upon Me.

(Chapter III, Page 130, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 211

It follows from the love that the devotee bears to God, that he bears equal love towards those who bear the same love towards Him.... As two lakes, which are in close proximity to each other, send their waves into one another, and as the mingling waves form as it were a crest-house for them, similarly, the waves of the joy of the two lovers of God mix with each other, and becomes ornaments of illumination for either.

(Chapter III, Page 129, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 210

"Granted that all the intellectual preparation is made for the realization of God; granted also that one meets with the Guru, and that he imparts to him the knowledge of the true path; but, is one able to attain to one's original health as soon as one has taken the medicine? Or does it follow that when the sun has arisen, he immediately reaches the zenith? Granted that the field is well-tilled and watered; granted also that the seed that is sown is good of its kind; but it is only in time that a rich harvest could be reaped. Similarly, granted that the true path is known; granted that company with the good is attained; granted that dispassion has been generated, and real discrimination formed; it will however take time to know that the One alone is, namely God, and that all else is nought......To experience the unitive life in Brahman is a matter of only gradual attainment. Even though various kinds of dishes may be served before a hungry man, still he attains to satisfaction only by morsel after morsel. In a similar way, by the help of dispassion if one lights up the lamp of discrimination, that light will enable one ultimately to find out God" (Jnanesvari XVIII. 996-1008)

(Chapter III, Page 127, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 209

" ....What...is one-pointed devotion?...... As the lustre of the jewel is the jewel itself, as the liquidity of water is water, as space is the sky, as sweetness is sugar,......as consolidated ice is the Himalaya mountain, as congealed milk is curds, similarly, the whole world is Myself. Do not, therefore, deny the world to find Me. I include the whole world in Me. Experience such as this means one-pointed devotion, and My devotee has got this one-pointed devotion"

(Jnanesvari XIV. 372-382).

(Chapter III, Page 125, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 208

If you cannot deliver your heart immediately to God, then at least do this : think of God at least for a moment during the twenty-four hours of the day...

(Chapter III, Page 115, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 207

No sin is too great to remain undestroyed in a supernal kind of devotion. Thus, if a sinful man just bathes in the waters of repentance, and comes inside the temple to Me with all devotion, his whole lineage becomes pure, and he becomes a man of noble birth.

(Chapter III, Page 110, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 206

When one feels that he is in the right, he need not be afraid of anybody.

(Chapter XVI, Page 333, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 205

If God is omnipotent, man need ask whatever he desires of God alone...What is lacking to Him, whom all Powers serve?. We must sacrifice our mind and body and speech to God. He who supports the universe cannot help supporting us. Only, God favours people according to their deserts...Rain pours down of its own accord; but the earth brings forth fruit according to its quality. Like seed, like crop......it follows that we must cultivate goodness and avoid evil.

(Chapter XVI, Page 332-333, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 204

"We should have no other belief except this. God is all-powerful, and can achieve anything whatsoever. Why need a man care for anything at all? He who pervades the universe, and directs the will, what can He not accomplish?" (Abg. 1174)

(Chapter XVI, Page 332, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 203

Man's business is only to rest in God, and to carry on his work without asking anything from Him. "Let the body be delivered over to God, and God will do as He pleases. He is the support of the whole world, and will bring about the proper thing at the proper moment. In this faith should we grow strong, says Tuka" (Abg. 2229).

(Chapter XVI, Page 332, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 202

...all things depend on God. With His great power, what can He not do? God indeed is the universal mover. He moves the body as well as the universe. "Who makes this body move? Who can make us speak except God Himself? It is God only who can make us hear or see......He alone can continue the mind in its egoism. He it is who can make even the leaf of a tree move....God has filled the Whole inside and outside. What can be lacking to Him in His universal presence?"

(Chapter XVI, Page 332, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 201

...when a man has ...Bhakti, he may be said to have performed all religious functions whatsoever. "When a man has placed his mind, and words, and body at Thy service, there is no duty for him which he need perform. Why need he worship any stones ?......Why need he bathe in the holy waters ? What sins can he be relieved thereby ? ..."In this way, the Bhaktimarga", says Tuka, "is the only easy pathway in this age..."

(Chapter XVI, Page 324, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)


Week 200

The uttering of the name of God is indeed an easy way for reaching Him. One need not go to a distant forest. God will Himself come to the house of a Saint. One should sit at a place, concentrate his mind, invoke God with love, and utter His name time after time. I swear by God's name, says Tuka, that there is no other way for reaching God: indeed this is the easiest of all ways (Abg. 1698)

(Chapter XVI, Page 318-319, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 199

One should not wait for a suitable opportunity to turn up to meditate on God. One should begin immediately.

(Chapter XVI, Page 317, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 198

I know my own faults too well, O God. But I cannot help the wanderings of my mind. Now stand between myself and my mind, and show Thy compassion.....I have solely become a slave of my senses. Be not indifferent to me, O God, however wicked I may be (Tukarama Abg. 2082)

(Chapter XV, Page 289, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 197

Jnanesvara tells us that the office of God is always for the welfare of the Saint...Whatever they intend to do, I must then Myself accomplish for them...His devotees need never entertain any anxiety for their material and spiritual welfare.

(Chapter III, Page 130-131, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 196

Jnanesvara tells us time after time that the devotee is dearer to God than anything or anybody else. "That secret which He did not impart to His father Vasudeva, nor to His mother Devaki, nor even to His brother Balibhadra, Krishna imparted to His devotee Arjuna..."

(Chapter III, Page 129, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 195

Perfection in mystical life can be attained only gradually. One must not expect to reach the end immediately that one has entered the path.

(Jnanesvari XVIII.996-1008)

(Chapter III, Page 127, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 194

God can be attained by Bhakti alone. "How very often should I tell the, O Arjuna, if thou longest after Me, worship Me. Care not for the dignity of birth. Mind not the consideration of nobility. Throw away the burden of learning. Cease to be inflated by the beauty of form and youth. If thou hast no devotion towards Me, all this is as good as nought..." (Jnanesvari XVI. 430-440)

(Chapter III, Page 111, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 193

...the way towards God ...lies in the destruction of three moral vices, Kama, Krodha and Lobha (passion, anger, and covetousness), which are compared to the high-way robbers on the way towards God. Where these three gather together, know that evil is destined to prosper....It is only when these three leave the mind of man, that he is able to secure the company of the good, and to walk on the path of liberation. (Jnanesvari XVI. 424-443)

(Chapter III, Page 106-107, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 192

We should worship the all-pervading God by the flowers of our actions. Thus alone will God be pleased. (Jnanesvari XVIII. 916-922)

(Chapter III, Page 103, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 191

Do your duty, and the end will take care of itself. (Jnaneswari III.85-94).

(Chapter III, Page 101, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 190

The body should be devoted to the service of the parents, who are holier than any other holy objects. The Guru must particularly be worshipped, who so compassionately bestowed upon us Knowledge, and showed us the way out of the wilderness of Samsara. (Jnaneswari XVII. 202-211).

(Chapter III, Page 95, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 189

Non-injury consists in making the body, speech, and mind exist only for the happiness of the world. (Jnaneswari XVI. 113-185).

(Chapter III, Page 88, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 188

Straightforwardness consists in being good to all beings, as milk is good to a child, or as the soul exists in all beings equally. (Jnaneswari XVI. 113-185).

(Chapter III, Page 88, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 187

...sacrifice, consists in dutifully offering to God whatever is best... Everyone can sacrifice in this way by only attending to his proper duties; one must not be infected with the poison of the fruit of actions. When a ball is struck at the ground, the real intention is not to strike the ground but to catch hold of the ball; when seed is sown in a farm, the real object is not the sowing of the seed, but the rearing of the crops; as again, a mirror is to be cleaned for enabling one to look at oneself inside it; similarly, one should study the sciences not for their own sake, but for the sake of God. (Jnaneswari XVI. 68-108).

(Chapter III, Page 87, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 186

Who has the power to frighten this servant of God? When, with His burning disc, God in person is ready to guard His devotee, who can attach him? No obstacle can present itself before him. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XXIII. 446-451).

(Chapter XII, Page 255, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 185

He, who has surrendered himself to God, has paid all his debts to deities, sages, ancestors and men. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XVII. 388-391; XXVIII. 323-329).

(Chapter XII, Page 255, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 177-184

In the way of meditation, however, there are four pitfalls, against which an aspirant must guard himself. They are: dissipation, passion, fickleness and absorption. All these are the faults of an unsteady mind. To revolve in the mind the sweetness of sense-objects, when one is sitting in a meditative posture, is dissipation. To attend only to love-stories or descriptions of sexual unions, is passion. To pass from one field of consciousness to another, and thus to be every moment unsteady like madman, is fickleness. To be inattentive through sad indifference to the chief object of meditation, and thus to be ultimately lost in sleep, or in a blue or yellow colours, is absorption. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XI. 706-711)

(Chapter XII, Page 253-254, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 176

Ekanatha tells us often that God's meditation is a panacea for all disturbances - physical as well as mental, material as well as spiritual. A single moment spent in meditating upon God can destroy tribulation, disease, obstacles, doubts, sin and egoism. All these things will vanish before the power of meditation. If it be not possible to find out a calm and quiet place, or to secure a good posture and meditate, even the constant repetition of His Name is able to ward off all calamities (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XXVIII. 612-620)

(Chapter XII, Page 253, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 175

What fear of danger can there exist for a Devotee, when God has given him such an assurance of protection. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. II. 542-545)

(Chapter XII, Page 251, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 174

...this human life is given by God not for self-destruction, but for patient work towards His attainment. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XIX. 272-280)

(Chapter XII, Page 246, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 173

The performance of duty alone has the power to purify the mind....The selfless discharge of one's duty pleases God. It can, therefore, be well called a boat which will help a man to cross the worldly ocean. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XVIII. 380-387)

(Chapter XII, Page 245, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 172

If a man wants to improve himself, he can find models worth copying everywhere, and at any time...Only a man must have the will to learn (Ekanatha Bhagavata. VII. 341-344)

(Chapter XII, Page 243, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 171

Ekanatha gives us a formula as to how to bring the mind under control. Has not the mind already levelled to the ground many of the so-called great persons? All sadhanas are useless against this. Ekanatha proposes an easy way of bringing it under control. As a diamond can be cut only by a diamond, so mind can be conquered only by mind. But even that is possible only when the grace of the Guru is secured. (Ekanatha Bhagavata. XXIII.684-691)

(Chapter XII, Page 243, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 170

The first step towards purification, the sine qua non of spiritual life, is a searching self-examination culminating in repentance. For, that alone has the power to wash off all dirt generated in the human mind by the evil contact with sense-objects. A few moments of true repentance have the power to burn all sin. Repentance is, therefore, the true act of atonement, which washes off all sin. All other acts of atonement are simply a farce. (Ekanatha Bhagavata XXVI. 17-20).

(Chapter XII, Page 242-243, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 169

To emaciate one's body by fasting, or some such processes, is not true Penance. So long as there are evil passions in man, all external appliances are useless.... The true meaning of penance, therefore, is constant meditation on God (Ekanatha Bhagavata XIX. 451-454)

(Chapter XII, Page 239, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 168

The sine qua non of spiritual life is purity, internal as well as external...Mere bodily purity, without the purity of heart, is absolutely useless. It would be a mere farce, like bathing a donkey...what is absolutely necessary, therefore, is an internal purity of the heart coupled with the external purity of good actions (Ekanatha Bhagavata III 380-399)

(Chapter XII, Page 239, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 167

...which of the two aspirants is superior....the devotee or the philosopher...Krishna evidently prices a devotee, whose devotion increases day by day as the river in the rainy season. Those who devote all their operations of the mind and senses to Me, says Krishna, and meditate without distinction of day and night, such devotees I prize more than anything else (Jnanesvari XII. 34-39)

(Chapter III, Page 69, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 166

The greatness of God is so infinite that Jnanesvara has no difficulty in saying that God cannot be known in His entirety. ... Thus one must throw aside all his greatness; one must forget all his learning; one must become smaller than the smallest thing in the world; only then could he hope to come in My presence... (Jnanesvari IX. 367-381)

(Chapter III, Page 65, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 165

God is really not different from the world. Originally from a seed grows the sprout, from the sprout the stem, from the stem the many branches, and from the branches the many leaves; after the leaves comes the flower, and from the flower the fruit; and yet when we consider it all, it is only the seed unfolded. In this manner am I identical with the whole world. From Me this world is spread; from the ant to the highest god, there is no being who is without Me... (Jnanesvari X. 98-118)

(Chapter III, Page 64, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 164

People try to find Me in perishable images, and thus escape My real imperishable nature. (Jnanesvari IX. 142-152)

(Chapter III, Page 63, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 163

Man vainly says that he is the agent of all actions. He forgets that he is only an occasional cause. (Jnanesvari XI. 466-467)

(Chapter III, Page 63, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 162

Even musk loses its odour if it is put alongside of asafetida. Similarly, good men lose their virtue if they keep the company of the wicked. Even if we were to feed the roots of the Nimba tree with the manure of sugar, it would not fail to produce bitter fruits (Ekanatha Abg. 19)

(Chapter XI, Page 221, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 161

There are only two ways for the attainment of spiritual life: one is that we should not get ourselves contaminated with other's wealth; the other is that we should not contaminate ourselves with other's women (Ekanatha Abg. 17)

(Chapter XI, Page 221, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 160

If one sincerely repents, God is not far from him. (Ekanatha Abg.12)

(Chapter XI, Page 220, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 159

What is not the grace of the Guru competent to do? (Jnanesvari XVIII. 1708-1735)

(Chapter III, Page 52, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 158

The only adequate way of expressing one's appreciation of the greatness of the Guru is to submit in silence to the feet of the Guru, for the greatness of the Guru can never be adequately praised. (Jnanesvari XIV. 1-16)

(Chapter III, Page 50, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 157

As when a tree is watered at the bottom, it goes out to the branches and foliage; as when a man has taken a bath in the sea, he may be said to have bathed in all the holy waters of the world; as when nectar has once been enjoyed all the flavours are forthwith enjoyed; similarly, when the Guru has been worshipped, all the desires become fulfilled. (Jnanesvari I. 22-27)

(Chapter 1, Page 48-49, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 156

It matters not to Jnanadeva what deity one worships, provided one worships rightly and earnestly.

(Chapter 1, Page 42, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 155

Bhakti drives away all desires from us. A Bhakta uplifts not merely himself but others also. He ceases to grieve; he ceases to hate; he feels no enjoyment in other things; he feels no enthusiasm for other things; he becomes intoxicated with love; he remains silent. Spiritual "Epokhe" is the mark of a saint.

(Chapter 1, Page 14, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 154

There are a thousand and one Names of God. It maters not which Name we utter. If we only utter it regularly and continuously, Death shall have no power over us. If a man does nothing but only utter the Name of God, God is satisfied and protects His Devotee.

(Preface, Page 16, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 153

An ignorant man is he who lives upon the respect which others pay to him. He expects to be honoured. He is pleased with hospitality....On the high tree of speech, he erects an archway of his own merits, as one may raise a broomstick on the top of a temple...

(Chapter III, Page 82, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 152

Mysticism denotes a silent enjoyment of God...It is not without reason that Plato in his 7th Epistle, which is now regarded as his own genuine composition, says: "There is no writing of mine on this subject, nor ever shall be. It is not capable of expression like other branches of study.....If I thought these things could be adequately written down and stated to the world, what fine occupation could I have had in life than to write what would be of great service to mankind" (341 c-e;vide Burnet-Thales to Plato, p 221)

(Preface, Page 1, Mysticism in Maharastra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 151

Knowledge consists in realizing that God alone is; that beyond Him and without Him there is nothing; that the knowledge of this world and of the other world is tantamount to mere ignorance. He alone has attained to Knowledge who becomes fixed in the idea that God alone is real, and all else an illusion. (XIII.616-632)

(Chapter III, Page 82, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 150

Unattachment, and Love of Solitude. In the midst of prosperity, such a man lives unattached, as one who only shows the way on a journey without going himself. (X111.594-598) And he also loves solitude.

(Chapter III, Page 81, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 149

Jnaneswara says that to take a pessimistic view of existence is for some time a necessary step in the realistion of spiritual knowledge. One should contemplate the griefs of birth and death, and old age and disease, before one actually becomes subject to them....One should determine that he should do nothing by means of which he would be subject to this condition again;...When a man finds himself in a house on fire, it will be useless to dig a well.

(Chapter III, Page 80, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 148

Un-Egoism consists in doing actions, as if a man were to be addicted to actions, and yet not to take pride for having done those actions...As wind moves everywhere without any idea, or as the Sun rises without any particular object, as revelation comes of its own accord, or as the Ganges moves without the notion of flowing to any particular place, similarly he acts without any pride.

(Chapter III, Page 79, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 147

It is only when a man gets... dispassion for the objects of sense that he becomes fit for the enjoyment of spiritual happiness. (Jnanesvari XIII. 514-523).

(Chapter III, Page 79, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 146

Self-control consists in not allowing the mind to obey the behests of the senses...A man of self-control is afraid lest the ghost of passion may overtake him, or the witch of desire may catch hold of him.

(Chapter III, Page 78-79, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 145

Steadfastness or constancy consists in not allowing the mind to move even a little bit, even though the body may roam from place to place...

(Chapter III, Page 78, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 144

...devotee is he who resigns all his things to the care of the Guru...he must regard himself fortunate that he is not maimed of body so as to be prevented from engaging in Bhajana; fortunate is he that he is not blind; fortunate is he that he is not lame; fortunate is he that he is not dumb; fortunate is he that he is not idle, for he would have been otherwise uselessly fed; fortunate is he that he is entertaining real love for his master; it is for these reasons says Jnanesvara, that he has been nourishing his body in order that he might do spiritual service to his Teacher ... (Jnanesvari XIII. 442-459)

(Chapter III, Pages 75,77 Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 143

Straightforwardness...Jnaneswara speaks of the ...Sage as being as equable as the sun, with whom persons do not count, or as accommodative as the sky, which gives place to all things inside it; his mind does not change from man to man, nor his conduct... (Jnanesvari XIII. 344-351)

(Chapter III, Page 75, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 139,140,141,142

Sufferance ... consists in courageously bearing the various kinds of affliction - physical, accidental, mental. Such a man is never tormented under heat, and never shakes under cold, and is not moved by any accident whatsoever; as the earth does not feel that it is over-peopled by the infinite number of beings that range on it, similarly, he is not inconvenienced under the hardship of any duality whatsoever; like an ocean, he gives room within himself to rivers and rivulets of grief, while, finally he is not conscious that he is suffering from these. This according to Jnaneswara, is unconscious sufferance. (Jnanesvari XIII. 344-351)

(Chapter III, Page 75, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 138

The ideal sage...his mind is as harmless as either his body or his speech; for his body and his speech would not be harmless, if the mind itself were not already harmless; for it is the seed that is sown in the ground which shows itself as a tree later on; similarly, the mind shows itself in the direction of the senses. (Jnanesvari XIII. 293-313)

(Chapter III, Page 74, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 137

An unpretentious man is he who does not bring out his hidden spiritual treasure as a covetous man never brings out his. Even under pain of death, such a man never speaks about his meritorious actions (Jnanesvari XIII. 203-217)

(Chapter III, Page 72,73, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 136

A humble man is he, says Jnaneswara, who feels any word or praise as a burden upon him. (Jnanesvari IX.221-227)

(Chapter III, Page 72, Mysticism in Maharashtra, Indian Mysticism, R D Ranade)

Week 135

The universe is ruled by one principle only namely, the Will of God - Tenth Book of Plato's Republic.

(Chapter XX, Page 241, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 134

Unless you set your heart fully upon Me, you will not cross this ocean of perils, says Lord Krsna; but if you turn a deaf ear to my advice through egoism, then ruin will be your only lot.

(Chapter XX, Page 241, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 130, 131, 132, 133

... unless there is the element of surrender in our devotion and unless we resign ourselves completely to the Power and Will of God, no great achievement in spritual life is possible.

(Chapter XIX, Page 226, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 129

Equanimity is both a condition and a result of God-devotion. Unless we preserve equanimity of mind we cannot reach God; and unless we have realised God, we cannot reach the highest stage of equanimity.

(Chapter XVII, Page 186-189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 128

Compassion is evidently an expression of praying for mercy from God. One of the cardinal principles of such praying for mercy from God would be to treat others as our own selves. Hence arises the necessity of showing compassion to all creatures whenever and wherever occasion requires it.

(Chapter XVII, Page 186-189, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 127

In Pythogoras harmony was the highest moral principle. In Plato wisdom, courage and temperance, all were synthesised in the supreme virtue of justice. In Aristotle Measure or the Mean became the central principle, of which all other virtues became specifications. In St. Paul and Christianity generally, and later in St. Augustine, faith, hope and charity, and of all these charity became the fundamental virtue. Charity means love in Greek. And so love of God and humanity was the principle at which Paul and Augustine aimed. After that when we come to Spinoza we find the intellectual Love of God as the central virtue. In Bentham we have benevolence; in Sidgwick we have equity; in Mahatma Gandhi we have truth and non-violence. So all these great writers and thinkers make it their business to centralise all virtues in one single principle of their choice... Bhakti or God-devotion is the central virtue according to ...the Bhagavadgita.

(Chapter XVII, Page 186-187, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 126

...what a great dishonesty would a man commit if he does not return to God at least a part of what God has conferred on him. This is a sort of an income-tax which we have to pay for the Divine Power: He who utilises all the products of his work for himself is a thief."

(Chapter XVI, Page 179, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 126

The Bhagavadgita tells us that the performance of one's highest duty is attended with a feeling of joy. This is the first effect. The second is the automatic purification of the mind. Man thinks that his bad actions are washed away simply by the performance of his duty; good actions act like a boomerang in a sense. (IV.23).

(Chapter XV, Page 178-179, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 125

Liberation is not to be found after death. But to know God, to do His work, to enjoy His presence and to devote oneself to His service are exactly what a Jivanmukta ought to do and that is the teaching of the Bhagavadgita.

(Chapter XV, Page 169, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 124

Our highest ideal is to approach, in meritorious deeds and in spritual realisation, our spiritual teacher because we regard that our spiritual teacher is identical with God.

(Chapter XIV, Page 154, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 123

Our actions should be interested and not disinterested, interested for the sake of the attainment of God - Aurobindo. This is not an unjustifiable proposition, because the supreme aim of ethical life is always the attainment of God.

(Chapter XIV, Page 153, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 122

"Give up thy sorrow; fight in the knowledge that thou hast not the power to carry out thy human work, but my work, as my instrument. Thou art nothing but an instrument, that is, an instrument for the most frightful and at the same time sublime majesty of God Himself. These words should be called the Carama Sloka, the highest verse of the Gita." - Otto.

(Chapter XIII, Page 144, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 121

Every man has the possibility of resurrecting himself, provided he rises from a life of sin to a life of God-devotion and God-realisation.

(Chapter XIV, Page 155, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 120

Jnanesvara....we should worship God with the blossomed flowers of our actions.

(Chapter XIV, Page 153, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 119

According to Mahatma Gandhi:- He is a real devotee who is jealous of none, who is a fount of mercy, who is without egoism, who treats alike cold and heat, happiness and misery, who is ever forgiving, who is always contented, whose resolutions are firm, who has dedicated his mind and soul to God, who causes no dread, who is not afraid of others, who is free from exultation, sorrow and fear, who is pure, who is versed in action and yet remains unaffected by it, who renounces all fruit, good or bad, who treats friend and foe alike, who is untouched by respect or disrespect, who is not puffed up by praise, who does not go under when people speak ill of him, who loves silence and solitude, who has a disciplined reason." Anasakti Yoga, p 126.

(Chapter XI, Page 129, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 118

Wherever there is excellence, wherever there is pre-eminence, wherever there is a portion of the great power and lustre of God, there we might regard that God is present as an incarnation.

(Chapter XI, Page 128, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 117

Granted that all the preparation is made for the realisation of God, that one meets the Guru, that the Guru imparts to him the knowledge of the true path; granted that the seed that is sown is the best of its kind, yet it is only in course of time that a rich harvest can be reaped.

(Chapter V, Page 65, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 116

Perfection is only gradual says Mirabai. A gardener might sprinkle water upon the trees and the plants, but it is only after the spring sets in that the trees and plants bear fruit.

(Chapter V, Page 65, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 115

We are born here below in this mortal world in order to do action. But we should also see that we do not become entangled in it.

(Chapter 1, Page 13, The Bhagavadgita as a Philosophy of God-realisation, being a clue through the labyrinth of Modern Interpretations, R D Ranade)

Week 114

...the spirit which breathes in the twelfth Edict of Asoka is a permanent monument to its greatness: "There should be no praising of one's sect and decrying of other sects, but on the contrary, a rendering of honour to other sects for whatever cause honour may be due to them." If this spirit pervades our everyday activities, if it becomes the foundation-stone of our philosophies and religions, if our politics come to be based upon such a principle, the world will soon be habitable, for God will come to live in it.

(Page 98, Essays and Reflections - Indian Philosophy, R D Ranade)

Week 113

A frank acknowledgement of one's error is the noblest duty that one can do.

(Page 84, An Ideal Critic - Essays and Reflections, R D Ranade)

Week 112

I believe that Bhakti does not consist in religious ceremonials, in pilgrimages, and in formal idol-worships: it consists in love to God, and through this, in love to man. We can never love man so well as when we know that he partakes of the same divine nature which is in us. Love to humanity must be based on Love to God: if it is not, it is bound to have a shaky foundation. It is the Love which we bear to God that inspires us with Love to man: and those who love man otherwise love him accidentally and not essentially.

(Page 181, Philosophical and Other Essays, R D Ranade)

Week 111

One of the central teachings of Christianity, namely...the doctrine of humility: "Except ye become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven" (St. Matthew XVIII.3)

(Page 20, Philosophical and Other Essays, R D Ranade)

Week 110

The doctrine of Brahman could be regarded neither as Brahmanic nor as Kshatriyan, and that anybody, who came to 'know', to whatever class he might have belonged, was regarded as Sage.

(Page 333, Bibliographical note, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 109

... for the realisation of the Self, the Upanishads inculcate a life of introversion, with an utter disgust for the world and catharsis from sins, a spirit of humbleness, and a life of tranquillity, truth, penance, insight, strength and right pursuit. Unless these conditions are fulfilled, the aspirant after spiritual life may never hope to realise the Self.

(Page 242, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 108

The extremely practical character of the Upanishadic Seers towards the problem of Self-realisation is exhibited in the Kenopanishad, where we are told that the end of life may be attained only if the Self were to be realised even while the body lasts; for if Self-knowledge does not come while the body lasts, one cannot even so much as imagine what ills may be in store for him after death.

(Page 240, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 107

Be true and fear not. Your strength would be as the strength of ten, if only your heart is pure. On the other hand, if you hide the canker of Untruth in your bosom, in mortal fear you shall walk even in the midday sun.

(Page 228, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 106

we should always mould our conduct on the pattern of the conduct of those who are better than ourselves and are in a position to give us rules of conduct by their example.

(Page 213, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 105

According as a man's works are, so does he become.

(Page 116, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 104

There is, in fact, as much likeness, or as little, between sleep and ecstasy, as there is, as Spinoza would have said, between God and Dog: The same letters, but what an important difference!

(Page 90, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 103

Mysticism was the culmination of Upanishadic philosophy, as it is the culmination of all philosophies, and one who does not understand that the cosmology and the psychology, the metaphysics and the ethics of the Upanishads are merely a propaedeutic to their mystical doctrine can scarcely be said to have understood the spirit of Upanishadic philosophy.

(Page 45, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 102

...even a man belonging to the lowest order of society could, if he possessed the necessary abilities and means, be in the vanguard of those who knew.

(Page 44, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 101

Biologically, it (Being) is the supreme life-principle, which gives life to the universe. The branches may die and yet the tree lives; but when the tree dies, the branches die also. Similarly, the universe may vanish, but God remains; but God cannot vanish, and hence the latter alternative is impossible.

(Page 38, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)


Week 100

... spiritual happiness is the spring of all action; action is the cause of faith; faith, of belief; when a man believes, he thinks; when he thinks, he knows; and when he knows, he reaches the truth. In this way, happiness, action, faith, belief, thought, knowledge and truth constitute, in Sanatkumara's hands, a moral ladder to realisation.

(Page 37, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 99

As all the spokes are contained between the axle and felly of a wheel, all things and all selves are connected in and through the Supreme Self. It is on account of the Supreme Self, that all things stand related together.

(Page 36, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 98

As an example of the sublime in nature, we may take he passage from the Brihadaranyaka which tells us that "by the command of the imperishable Brahman, the sun and the moon stand in their places; by the command of that Brahman, the heaven and the earth stand apart; by the command of that Brahman, the moments and the hours, the days and the nights, the half-months and the months, the seasons and the years, all stand apart; by the command of that Brahman, some rivers flow out to the east from the White Mountains, and others to the west or some other quarter"

(Page 30, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 97

... no man who is not humble may hope to come into the presence of His Power.

(Page 17, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 96

... those who know really do not know, and those who do not know may alone be said to know the ultimate reality.

(Page 17, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 95

...the ideal Sage stands unruffled in the midst of temptations and sorrows

(Page 17, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 94

... a socratic view (of wisdom) that a great spiritual teacher must never contaminate himself with the acceptance of presents.

(Page 14, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 93

The real meaning of Revelation seems ...to be not any external message delivered to man from without, but a divine afflatus springing from within, the result of inspiration through god-intoxication... Thus every rhapsodist or poet...is excellent in proportion to the extent of his participation in the divine influence, and the degree in which the Muse itself has descended on him...And thus it appears ...that these transcendent poems are not human; as the work of men, but divine, as coming from God."

(Page 6, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 92

"Our real sacrifice consists in making oblations to the Prana within us. One who does not know this inner sacrifice, even if he were to go in for a formal sacrifice, throws oblations merely on ashes. On the other hand, he who knows this inner sacrifice is relieved of his sins as surely as wool is burnt in a flame of fire. Knowing this inner sacrifice, even if a man were to do acts of charity for a Chandala, he may verily be regarded as having sacrificed to the Universal Soul"

(Page 5, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 91

"Seek not favour from any such divinity; reality is not the divinity which you are worshipping - nedam yad idam upasate; the guardian of order is not outside; natural and moral order does not come from without; it springs from the Atman, who is the synthesis of both outside and inside, who is veritably the ballast of nature, who is the unshakable bund that prevents the stream of existence from flowing recklessly as it lists."

(Page 3, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 90

With the advance of knowledge and with the innumerable means for communication and interchange of thought, the whole world is being made one, and the body of Western Philosophers could ill afford to neglect the systems of Indian Philosophy, and more particularly the Upanishads.

(Page xiii, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 89

...the true role of the Spiritual Teacher... like a lamp-post on the Pathway to God, of simply directing the benighted wanderer on the path of spiritual progress...

(Page xi, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 82

Knowledge has taken immense strides with the growth of time. Scientific inventions have enormously enriched the patrimony of man. The old order has changed, and a new one has taken its place. Nevertheless. the goal of human life as well as the means for its attainment have remained the same. Unquestionably, the search after God remains the highest problem even to-day, and a philosophical justification of our spiritual life is as necessary to-day as it was hundreds of years ago.

(Page xvii, A Constructive Survey Of Upanishadic Philosophy R D Ranade)

Week 81

I believe that Bhakti does not consist in religious ceremonials, in pilgrimages, and in formal idol-worships: it consists in love to God, and through this, in love to man. We can never love man so well as when we know that he partakes of the same divine nature which is in us. Love to humanity must be based on Love to God: if it is not, it is bound to have a shaky foundation. It is the Love which we bear to God that inspires us with Love to man: and those who love man otherwise love him accidentally and not essentially.

(Page 181, A vindication of Indian Philosophy, Philosophical and Other Essays - R D Ranade)

Week 80

Part 6 of 6

... altruism ... Rahim tells us in his Doha that accumulation of wealth should be intended for universal welfare; the trees do not partake of their own fruit; the lake does not drink its own water. Inequality will vanish, if material wealth is evenly distributed according to worth, while the distribution of spiritual wealth becomes the chief task of the God-realiser.

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 397, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 79

Part 5 of 6

...self-surrender...Kabir tells us in his Doha, that all things come to us from God. Why then not dedicate them back again to God? The position we enjoy, the power we wield and the wealth we accumulate are all due to His sweet will; why then not hand back the power, the position, and the wealth to their Dispenser?

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 396-397, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 78

Part 4 of 6

... a God-realiser ... stands in the market-place, like Socrates, without any partiality for anybody. He has neither friends nor foes says the Bhagavadgita.

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 396, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 77

Part 3 of 6

Those who are great never talk in big terms...the fire-fly is entirely unconscious of its light which is behind it, and which it sheds for the sake of others, and not for itself. It is this great humility and unconsciousness of one's own powers, that constitute another mark of God-realisation.

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 395, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 76

Part 2 of 6

... the greatest virtue of a mystic is silence. Rahim tells us in the spirit of Augustine's 'Ignorando cognosci, Cognoscendo ignorari,' that those who know do not speak, and those who speak do not know.

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 394, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 75

Part 1 of 6

What are the chief marks by which a God-realiser may be known? By putting together all the different concepts from the Dohas, we may arrive at the following five-fold scheme of moral characteristics, which single out the God-realiser from others:

(1) Epoche, (2) Humility, (3) Equanimity, (4) Self-surrender, and (5) Altruism

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 393-394, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 74

Newton, after spending his entire life in discovering the law of gravitation, said ultimately that he had found only a few pebbles on the shore of time; even so Kabir speaks of his having been fortunate to get only a fragment of Divine experience. We must, however remember that Kabir touched God, which is not a fragment. God remained pervading his vision, which is not a fraction. The fragment and the fraction are merely expressions of Kabir's great humility.

(Part II, Chapter V, Page 390, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 73

... the spiritual seeker ...must bid good-bye to all the sense of self-importance, which is often too subtle even for those who are given to heart searching.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 359, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 72

"Just as the one object of the anxiety of the Chakor is the light of the Moon; just as the one object of the anxiety of the lotus is the rise of the Sun; just as the one object of the anxiety of the bee is the juice in a fragrant flower; similarly my one object of anxiety,' says Basaveshwar,' is the remembrance of my God..."

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 355-356, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 71

...an aspirant must recognise the extreme value of the present moment. What you intend to do tomorrow do to day, and what you want to do today, do it just now. You must not lose a single moment of your life in the pursuit of vanities. Death is ever ready to pounce upon you, and he does not care whether you have finished your work or not.

(Part II, Chapter IV, Page 351-352, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 70

A simple, unquestioning, and implicit faith in our Maker is the only guarantee of an unimpeded and progressive realisation of the Godhead.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 331, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 69

Unless we place our fullest reliance upon God, it will not be possible for us to reach the state to which we aspire.

(Part II, Chapter III, Page 320, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 68

Good consequences would follow good conduct and evil consequences evil conduct, exactly as the wheels of a cart would follow the heel of the bullocks.

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 286, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 67

We need not deny material welfare even if we pursue spiritual welfare, and a true moral philosopher would be he who would reconcile them in proper perspective.

(Part II, Chapter II, Page 283, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 66

The Sadguru, according to Kabir, is therefore one who liberates not merely himself, but also his associates.

(Part I, Chapter V, Page 265, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 65

It is a great problem to me God, how to appease Thee. There is no article that I can use for Thy service. Thou art present, O Lord, in the image and Thou Art present in the flowers. Placing flowers on Thy image is like placing God upon God. If I were to make an invocation to Thee, it would be doing injustice to Thy omni-presence, because Thou art present here as everywhere. If I were to ring a bell to wake Thee up, it would be an act of great disrespect, because Thou art always wakeful. If I were to make any offering to Thee, it would be carrying coals to New Castle, because Thou art the master of everything in the world, and thus no offering could be made to Thee. Waving lights before Thee would be entirely ridiculous because any light that we may place before Thee is like darkness before the great luminous Being which Thou art, before whom the Sun, the Moon and the Stars look only like dark bodies."

(Part I, Chapter V, Page 258-259, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 64

We should not allow even a single breath to pass unutilised. It would not be impossible to fasten your mind on God, while your hand is doing its work.

(Chapter V, Page 257, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 63

Take care of every moment. Allow not a single eye-lash to beat in vain. Burn your sins. Awaken the invisible Lord. You have not to live here forever. Work unceasingly, for you do not know when the tent may fall.

(Chapter V, Page 256, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 62

It is not God who needs awakening, but it is the man who has to awaken himself to God. The Lord is always awake. How would it be possible for a man to awaken Him? Man has to awaken himself to the consciousness and presence of God, and keep himself awake in that state.

(Chapter V, Page 248, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 61

Kabir gives us the illustration of a balance with two pans. So long as the aspirant has not attained to God-vision, we may say that in his case one pan is up and the other is down. By the attainment of God, however, the upper pan comes to level with the other, as in the case of Krishna. What now remains to be weighed? The Saint in all ways thus becomes equal to God.

(Chapter V, Page 240, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 60

Let us concentrate our mind on the one omnipotent God, who is capable of taking away all our evils under all circumstances.

(Chapter III, Page 127, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 59

... whenever we find ourselves in a critical situation, we should lift our minds towards God, throw ourselves upon His mercy, and pray to Him to protect us from opposing evils.

(Chapter III, Page 126, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 58

Whatever man may do, God has the power to extend its goodness or destroy its badness. The question arises as to what is the relationship between self-effort and Grace. Man may make his own effort, and yet it remains with God to crown that effort with success by His Grace.

(Chapter III, Page 120, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 57

A series of 5 thoughts, one per week, concluding in week 5.

Part 5 of 5

God-love would then be found to be the central virtue in which are focussed all the virtues that have been mentioned in our inventory, and which thus illumines them all. All virtues, to deserve their name, must merely be the expressions, manifestations, or aspects of this central virtue, and all vices only dereliction's or aberrations therefrom

(Chapter 2, Page 92, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 56

A series of 5 thoughts, one per week, concluding in week 5.

Part 4 of 5

An inventory of virtues and vices that have been dealt with by the Hindi saints might stand as follows

Vices

1.Braggartism 2. Pollution of Mind 3. Greed 4. Hypocrisy 5. Arrogance 6. Voluptuousness

(Chapter 2, Page 90, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 55

A series of 5 thoughts, one per week, concluding in week 5.

Part 3 of 5

An inventory of virtues and vices that have been dealt with by the Hindi saints might stand as follows

Spiritual virtues

1. Celibacy 2. Penance 3. Introversion 4. Study of Philosophy 5. Reverence for Master 6. Meditation on God (His Name, Qualities, Exploits, and Words) 7. Divine Optimism 8. Vision of God everywhere

(Chapter 2, Page 89-90, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 54

A series of 5 thoughts, one per week, concluding in week 5.

Part 2 of 5

An inventory of virtues and vices that have been dealt with by the Hindi saints might stand as follows

Social virtues

1.Good Company 2. Sympathy 3. Benevolence 4. Sacrifice

(Chapter 2, Page 89, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade) Week 53

A series of 5 thoughts, one per week, concluding in week 5.

Part 1 of 5

An inventory of virtues and vices that have been dealt with by the Hindi saints might stand as follows

Individual virtues

1.Activism 2. Non-attachment 3. Discrimination 3. Self-control 5. Courage 6. Patience 7. Sufferance 8. Equanimity

(Chapter 2, Page 89, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 52

" I am the constant door-keeper of my devotee, " says the Lord, " I make it a point to save such a one from dangerous situations as a mother saves her child by withdrawing it instantly from a fire or from a serpent"

(Chapter 2, Page 80, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 51

Jnaneshwar tells us, "Histories and Mythologies are merely stories of dead men. Why do not these considerations prompt you. Oh! vile man, to the pursuit of spiritual life?"

(Chapter 1, Page 47, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature R D Ranade)

Week 50

To him (Surdas), resignation or submission to the will of God would be a more potent instrument of achieving the end than either belief in an unseen power or a philosophic reconciliation with a world order. Who, ever, in the course of history has emerged successful except through an alliance with God?

(Chapter 1, Page 40,41, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 48,49

... so, even a consciousness of our own sins, provided we mend our ways and never return to the bad life again, provided we go forward courageously on the path of virtue, then, that consciousness will serve as sure incentive to the consummation of our spritual life.

(Chapter 1, Page 23,24, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 47

... we are told by Tulsidas that it is impossible to understand fully the architectonic skill of the Creator. "The way in which you have constructed the world, O Creator, " says Tulsidas " passes beyond our comprehension. If we just look at the handi-work of God either in the macrocosm or in the microcosm, our imagination reels, and our mind remains enwrapped within itself, so that any philosophical discussion of Thy powers becomes impossible."

(Chapter 1, Page 11, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 46

Krishnanand ... tells us that we have come into this world for buying and selling merchandise - he means spiritual merchandise - but we have not been successful in our transaction... our only profit should be God. Everything, in other words, except the pursuit of God is a vanity.

(Chapter 1, Page 10, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 45

The cumulative experience of the mystics of East and the West would prove that there is a certain amount of universality in their mystical experience. They have the same teaching of the Name of God, the fire of Devotion, the nature of Self-realisation, and so forth, and it is due only to an overweening superciliousness that certain people might regard the mystics of one country or religion, as different from, or superior to, the mystics of other lands or faiths. If all men are equal before God, and if men have the same 'Deiform faculty,' which enables them 'to see God face to face', then there is no meaning in saying that there is a difference between the quality of God-realisation in some, as contrasted with the quality of God-realisation in others.

(Page 6, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 44

The mystics of all ages and countries have spoken the same language, as they are denizens of the same spiritual world. There are no racial, no communal, no national prejudices among them. Time and Space have nothing to do with the eternal and infinite character of their mystical experience. These together constitute a band of Divine musicians, each contributing his own note, and all together producing a harmony that is wonderful.

(Page 1-2, Pathway to GOD in Hindi Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 43

Atman tests Man

Elders give something to a child and just to test its attitude ask it to give that thing back to them. If it returns the thing, they are pleased with this attitude. They really do not want a thing nor will they take it back. Similarly Atman creates situations to test your attitude. Atman finds it essential that you should give up all attachments. Atman would not test you further if willingness is shown to give up all attachments. If all qualities are renounced one by one and you stand to serve Him only, He is pleased and is propitiated. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 42

You should never tell a lie even when there is trouble ahead. It might seem that some danger is averted due to false-hood. On the contrary it is increased. Risk or no risk, you should never tell a lie. Yet there is one consideration. You might once a while tell a lie even at the cost of your personal loss, if your words would benefit others. If somebody's life is at stake, you should utter a lie to save the life, even though some evil may befall on you due to this action. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 40,41

Always you should show mercy to all animals. You should not be harsh and merciless to anybody. Always, one Atman stays in all bodies. Atman staying in others stays in you. Therefore, if you are harsh and merciless to others, it is transferred to Atman. And if you are harsh and merciless to Him, He too will be harsh and merciless to you. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 39

Anguish for the Absolute

Spritual aspirants should not worry about their worldly possessions but always be anxious about AbsoluteIf they feel anxious about Atman, Atman also feels concerned about them. He takes care that they do not lack in anything and looks after them and their families. The grace of God's name received from Sadguru is the only means of uprooting anxiety from the mind. Meditation on this Name of God removes all anxiety from the mind and automatically God showers His grace. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 38

Idleness is the chief enemy

Nobody should ever remain idle. Because indolence ruins not only the idle individual but also his family. It is its nature to ruin one who resorts to it. So it should be kept at a safe distance. For example when one sits for meditation, one feels drowsy and idleness gets set in the mind and body. Hence the moment one feels sleepy, one should drive away the idleness and concentrate on the name of God. If this is followed for a fortnight or so, the idleness will disappear. When one feels lazy about a particular work that work should be performed at that very moment. If this way of life is continued, then it becomes a habit. You should be ruthless in the beginning and it will vanish in a few days. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 37

Do nothing Secretively

Nothing should be done clandestinely in this world. If you must then it should be free from fear of others. However you can be secretive about your own personal life. There is no need of being afraid of anybody in this respect. The spiritual meditation should alone be done secretly. Nothing except this, need be concealed. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 36

Sometimes it appears that injustice will be beneficial and justice will cause great loss. Even under such circumstances, you should not leave the path of justice. Good conduct should not be discontinued. This is a visible loss. The Omniscient Atman makes good such visible losses because of the righteous conduct. But when some injustice is committed, then due to this wrong conduct, one suffers losses that are not easily discerned by the eye. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 35

It looks all right, while extracting the money from other through fraud but this money instantly vanishes in the same way as it came, when little pious deeds done in earlier lives I worn off. It will never stay. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 34

Deceit is an evil.

Never cheat others. Deceit is a great evil. The very purpose for which deceit is committed would be defeated. Never betray a person after having given a promise. If you seize wealth etc, from others through fraud your wealth etc. will be lost in the same way. Your hands stand branded. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 33

To think of sensuous pleasures in mind while showing outwardly as if engrossed in meditation is hypocrisy. Hypocrisy should not be entertained. For God is omniscient an omnipresent. He knows all. Therefore, He should never be deceived by hypocrisy. . (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 32

One should not be jealous at the sight of the prosperity of others in the form of progeny, wealth and high achievements etc. Nor should one resent it, nor pine for it. The jealous will always famish, the envious will never have off springs. Never think ill of others. If done so, it will bring ill to yourself. For one Atman resides in all beings. You should therefore always wish good to others, so that God would bestow on you the prosperity and other things as per the strength of your conduct. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 31

Every man has tremendous ego and pride. This is very bad. Pride pays no dividends. You should remember the examples of great men whenever pride enters your mind and should thus advise yourself, " Persons with such great achievements are not proud, then why should I be so?". You should be afraid of losing due to pride whatever little you have and hence nip the pride in the bud. If it sprouts in the mind it should be instantly destroyed. Whatever little has been bestowed upon by God should be consumed quietly, leading a happy and contented life, without any show. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 30

Vigilance over conduct at every step

You should always examine your conduct critically. Even when a thorn pricks you at the very moment you should search and find out why it pricked. What wrong have you done and where did you out step the path of right. You should scold your mind continuously and correct your conduct. Thus you should scrutinise your behavior at every step. Then no disease will come to you nor will any harm be done to you. (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 29

As the Seed so the Crop

Good and evil are our own doings. As the seed, so the crop. If good seeds are sown, the crop will be good if the seed is bad, the crop will be bad. If bitter cummin seeds are sown, the crop will be of bitter cummin seeds only. Wheat will grow if wheat seeds are sown. How can we get the crop of wheat when bitter cummin seed are sown; even if you wish for it? (Teachings of Shri Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 28

... the aspirant must avoid the extremes of self-indulgence and self-torture. We are familiar with the warning of the Gita that he who fasts and he who eats too much, he who sleeps too much and he who keeps vigil too long, he who works too much and he who does no work, none of these can be Yogin. The Gita's injunction is to lead a balanced life of moderation.

(Page 298-299, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 27

Places of pilgrimage become purified when the saint visits them. Other people think that they should pass away at a holy place and that their body should fall on the bank of a holy river. But the saint being eternally liberated, becomes the sanctifier of all existence. (Page 284, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 26

... no sinner is eternally damned and that it is never too late to mend. No doubt so far as our past actions are concerned we have to enjoy the fruits or suffer the consequences. But the future is in our hands. We are the architects of our destiny. So far as the future is concerned we are free to determine it as we desire.

(Page 281-282, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 25

Poor human beings unnecessarily welter in misery as they do not know how easy it is to win the love of God who does not tolerate even for a moment separation from His beloved devotees.

(Page 270-271, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 24

It is not God who needs awakening; for He is always awake. It is man who needs to awaken himself to the consciousness and presence of God.

(Page 262, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 23

No man can hope to attain this vastu unless he has got real bhava or devotion. Mere counting of beads or observation of fasts on Ekadasi, eleventh day of a month would be of no use. Of course it will make your mind pure; but it will not lead you to God-realisation. What is wanted is devotion and not mere counting of beads ...

(Page 242, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 22

God always sides with his devotees because of their overflowing devotion and complete self-surrender to Him. As such it is no wonder if final victory and infinite auspiciousness, which are the very nature of God belong as well to the devotees who have made a conflagration of themselves in the burning fire of God-love. These God-realisers constitute a blessed community, and on account of their intense love for afflicted mankind they live only for its benefaction and betterment, proclaiming from pole to pole, like a rumbling cloud, the eternal Gospel of God from everlasting to everlasting.

(Page 318, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 21

... repetition of God's name is the only adequate means to realise Him. God never minds the want of intelligence in His devotee, nor does his highly sinful nature. Howsoever low be the caste or race or profession of the devotee, he should only surrender himself completely to God and repeat incessantly in full faith the name of God and he is sure to attain to the highest realisation of God.

(Page 192, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 20

Inattention means attention to objects irrelevant to the purpose, which one wants to achieve at the moment; and the only concrete and effective way to concentrate the mind on anything good is to fix it on something more interesting and important so that it may automatically be drawn away from all worldly thoughts, feelings and desires.

(Page 179, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 19

The ideal disciple (five important points)

Finally, this disciple is more than camphor. We very often burn camphor before God. It is a very pure substance. And this disciple is purer than camphor. What does this camphor do? The piece of camphor burns, shines before the deity, shines to His glory, but ultimately it disappears. Thus a vacuum or non-existence is created; but this ideal disciple is more than camphor, because he is immortal, he lives and makes his teacher live. So while the ordinary camphor exhausts itself, the real spritual disciple never does. He immortalises both himself and his teacher.

(Page 101, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 18

The ideal disciple (five important points)

Fourthly, he milks the Kamadhenu, the wish-fulfilling cow, and distributes the milk to the society and to the world. He plays the part of what, in Hindi provinces, is called an Ahira who milks cows and distributes their milk to the people. In that way he must take the milk from this Kamadhenu and distribute it among his disciples.

(Page 101, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 17

The ideal disciple (five important points)

Thirdly, he must become a flute in the hands of his master and act reflexly or automatically and do whatever the teacher directs him do.

(Page 101, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 16

The ideal disciple (five important points)

The second is that he is absolutely oblivious and unmindful of his own greatness. It is the duty of such an ideal disciple to sing the glory of his master. He has no other vocation. He might be great in away; but then he must be wholly forgetful of it.

(Page 100-101, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 15

The ideal disciple

There are five important points to be noted in this description. They are all worth remembering and those who want to imbibe the characteristics of an ideal disciple should as far as possible try to imitate these qualities. The disciple is described as born upon earth like Faith incarnate and as resplendent Penance; that is the first characteristic

(Page 100, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 14

Our highest ideal is to approach, in meritorious deeds and in spritual realisation, our spiritual teacher because we regard that our spiritual teacher is identical with God.

(Page 67, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 13

aba bhi nahi bigada hai kucha, thoda samaya baki raha- 'all is not yet completely lost, there is yet some time left for you.' Godliness will come to you even if you make up your mind to start your spiritual life just now. It is never too late to begin doing the right thing, begin your spiritual career at once.

(Page 52, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 12

In trying to get rid of passions you will get nearer to God and if you go nearer to God you will get rid of passions. So your deliverance from passions and your devotion to God are interdependent. Your only endeavour therefore, should be to pursue the pathway to God.

(Page 32, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 11

... no great work is accomplished except by mutual co-operation and help. The same is the case with the development of great spiritual ideals, which each one of us wants to realise. Unless there is co-operation and common endeavour nothing great can be achieved.

(Page 10, Pathway to GOD in Kannada Literature - R D Ranade)

Week 10

Our only pursuit should be to follow the will of God, and meditate on Him. If we just do this, I think He will come to our help in all circumstances. So long as we are serving God, we are immortal. Our lives are in the custody of God. We may throw away our mortal coil when He wills. We cannot die as long as He wants us to serve Him. (from letters by Shri Gurudeo)

Week 9

Man in the foolishness of the contemplation of his small success regards himself to be the lord of all he surveys; he believes that he may be the master of any situation in which he may be placed and that he may compel nature any time to bend to his sovereign will, but events in life prove that these are after all false expectations and that even though a little freedom may be granted to men, in small matters, he is yet not free in the highest sense of the term...Like a falcon to whose feet a string is tied, he can only fly in a limited sphere described by the length of the tether, but he is bound beyond that region. Similarly man may imagine that he is free to do any action he pleases, but his freedom is the freedom of the tethered falcon (The Constructive Survey of Upanishadic Philosopy)

Week 8

Good company is the company of good people. Company of person's superior to oneself, the company of persons with excellent virtues. Remembrance of God's name initiated by Sadguru is also a good company. To weave ceaselessly the name of God into breath is also good company. Good company is endless pursuit of Reality. Constant spritual Experience also is good company.

The company of the qualityless Reality should always be sought so that you become firm and liberated. If you are in the company of the Immutable you yourself will be immutable. (teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 7

Anxiety is an evil. Its crop grows very fast. Hence it should be nipped in the bud, the moment it appears. A person should advise his mind and uproot the anxiety completely. Anxiety is old age. Contentment is youth.

Men entertain anxiety right from their birth to death. The more they feel anxious the more the anxiety grows. Nothing happens due to their being anxious. God does what He wills. Men unnecessarily get exhausted by anxiety. (teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 6

You should treat others as yourself, and regard other's miseries as your own. You should know that the same distress, which you suffer when others graze their cattle in your field, would be felt by others if you let your cattle graze on their fields. You should treat others children as your own. In fact it would be better, if you are more affectionate to them than to your own children, so that God would love your children more. (teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 5

Echo is identical with the original sound. Others do unto you what you do unto them. They love you if you love them, they scorn you if you are angry with them You receive what you give to others. If you please them you shall get pleasure. If you make them unhappy you shall become miserable. For one Atman alone resides in all beings. And there is no doubt that He does unto you as you do unto others. (teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 4

There is no power in this world stronger than that of conduct. Your conduct determines the happiness and misery you get in this life. If your conduct is good, even Brahma, Vishnu and Mahesh together can do no harm to you, even if they wish to do. Then what of a poor human being! But the same three Gods together cannot confer on you happiness if your conduct is bad. The power of conduct is greater than the power Of God. (teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 3

Your conduct alone saves you from the miseries of life. You should not in the least rely on any one else. There is no other support for you except your own personal conduct. God stays in man's heart with a scale of balance in His hand. He distributes the fruits of conduct according to this balance. (teachings of Shree Nimbargi Maharaj)

Week 2

With his great powers, what can He not do? God, indeed is the Universal Mover. He moves the body as well as the universe. Who makes this body move? Who can make us speak except God Himself? It is God only that can make us hear or see.He ii is who can make even a leaf of a tree move.God has filled the whole universe inside and outside. What can be lacking to Him in his universal presence? Man's business is only to rest in God and to carry on His work without asking anything from him. Let the body be delivered over to God and god will do as He pleases. He is the support of the world and will bring about the proper thing at the proper moment. We should have no belief except this. God is all-powerful and can achieve anything whatsoever. Why need a man care for anything at all? He pervades the universe and directs the will. What can He not accomplish? (Mysticism in Maharastra)

Week 1

Is it not wonderful that people should keep repeating that there is no God when God has filled this world in and out? Is it not their misfortune that makes them say that God is not? That one should fall in a well of nectar and yet try to rid himself of it; what can we say about such a man except that he is unfortunate? The blind man is moving from place to place for a single morsel of food and he is kicking aside with his feet the wish-jewel that has happened to come in his way simply because in his blindness he cannot see. If these people were to open their eyes a little and look at Nature, they would soon find themselves convinced about God's existence. Do they not see Omnipotence everywhere? And must it not convince them about God's existence? That the sky can envelop everything, or the wind move ceaselessly on, or that the fire should burn, or that the rain should quench the ground; that the mountains should not move from their places; that the ocean must not overreach its bounds; that the earth must bear the burden of all creatures, that are on its surface; is not all this due to His order? (Mysticism in Maharastra)